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Egg Drop Experiment – #STEM Challenge for Kids

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Egg drop experiment #stem challenge for kids

For our final co-op class, the kids were all challenged to create a device that would keep a raw egg safe from a second story window drop. They have had a blast with their prior STEM challenges this semester, and this egg drop experiment was no different. Seeing the various creative ideas each came up with to protect their eggs – and the groans and cheers that resulted was equally as fun as the egg drop itself! 

The eggs were supplied when the kids arrived, but during the week prior there were a few guidelines to follow in creating a protective barrier for the eggs: the completed device could be no longer/taller/wider than 12 inches and they needed to use items they found around the house. This meant that if a parachute was added, it was also part of the 12 inch guideline, so it needed to fit within that parameter. And yes, I brought a ruler. A few kids had guessed beforehand and ended up making last minute modifications to have it fit. 

Egg Drop Experiment Ideas

Ideas from the kids varied and it was much fun to see if they worked and hear their theories as to why they thought it would. Some had tested their devices before coming (and had success), but many waited to see how it would work. 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-2

Our first egg drop used an old plastic jar lined with cotton balls galore. The jar was surrounded by skewers and adequately taped. The intent was to drop it and have the skewers cushion the drop so the jar wouldn’t hit the ground. 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-40

While the container flipped during it’s drop, the impact wasn’t enough to break the egg and the cotton balls did their job cushioning the blow. The only thing that did break the egg was trying to get it out of the jar. A success! 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-4

A recycled dishwasher tablet container filled with popcorn was the second entry. The overall container was very lightweight. 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-44

Another egg survival! 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-16

A ziploc bag filled with marshmallows and the egg surrounded by a gallon sized ziploc bag with more marshmallows was another entry. Predictions were looking good for this submission. 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-28

Unfortunately, the density of the marshmallows was enough to crush the egg and it made a fairly runny mess. 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-9

The smallest entry in the egg drop was a little box cushioned with cotton batting, a single egg carton styrofoam piece, all topped with rubber bands, the lid, and secured shut with a few rubber bands. 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-34

Even though it was so small, it worked beautifully! 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-5

A single roll of toilet paper with the cardboard tube removed and wrapped in duct tape was a cozy home for another egg. 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-48

The squishably soft goodness of whatever brand used was enough to cushion the drop – another survivor! 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-15

Bubble wrap around a small box was a last minute pull-together from one of the boys who may have forgotten to work on his assignment until the last minute. A parachute was also part of the plan, but was nixed due to size limitations. 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-20

Fortunately his last minute effort paid off and his entry made it! 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-13

This next one was fairly simple: tissue paper surrounding an egg with extra cushioning inside a plastic baggie then placed in a paper bag with more tissue paper. It was tested several times at home with success. 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-54

Unfortunately, the padding was not done the same as it had been prior, and the egg did not survive the official drop.

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-8

Someone’s dad might be a little upset this summer when he realizes a few car sponges are missing from the garage. Originally this creation had a parachute added, but it needed to be removed because of size requirements.  The sponges were glued together and a small space was hollowed out in the middle to house the egg. 

Egg Drop #STEM Challenge for kids-23

This one was a definite success, even after multiple bounces when it landed – and HIGH bounces at that!

Overall, this was such a FUN time with the kids and a great way to end our semester class together. Have you ever done an egg drop with your co-op class or kids at home? If not – have some fun and see who can come up the most creative idea! 

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How to Build an Egg Drop Project

Last Updated: January 21, 2022

wikiHow is a “wiki,” similar to Wikipedia, which means that many of our articles are co-written by multiple authors. To create this article, 13 people, some anonymous, worked to edit and improve it over time. This article has been viewed 27,865 times.

This project can be used by science students of various ages to complete a science fair project. These directions can be used to carry out directions and record results in a scientific fashion with accuracy to successfully complete an egg drop project.

Step 1 Collect all of the materials listed below that you will need for the project.

Community Q&A

Community Answer

  • Buy a trifold presentation board Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0
  • Use color pictures Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0
  • Create a digital graph online to compare all three trials of the experiment Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0
  • Before dropping the experiment make sure that no one is walking in the area you will drop the egg.*Wear gloves while handling the egg, so in case egg cracks you are not exposed to the raw egg contents. *Do not conduct the experiment if you are allergic to eggs. Thanks Helpful 3 Not Helpful 5

Things You'll Need

  • Masking Tape
  • 1 bag of cotton balls
  • 2 boxes of facial tissue
  • 1 carton of 6 eggs
  • Presentation board

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26 Egg-cellent Egg Drop Challenge Ideas

Teaching STEM one broken egg at a time.

egg drop examples

The egg drop may be the most versatile activity there is. It can be done in kindergarten to teach about gravity, in middle school to teach engineering, and in high school physics. (We’ve even done the egg drop in professional development as a team-building activity). These 26 egg drop ideas take the challenge far beyond basic.

1. Disaster egg drop

students standing to drop eggs during an egg drop challenge

Have students imagine that they are trying to deliver eggs to people who have been in a disaster. They must use contents from care packages to pack and try to deliver their eggs. The focus of this egg drop is on the change from potential to kinetic energy and how energy moves when it impacts the ground.

Try it: Care Package Egg Drop at Teach Engineering

2. Parachute egg drop

egg drop challenge with cups and coffee liner parachutes

Looking for tried-and-true ideas for the parachute egg drop method? Give students a variety of materials—straws, Popsicle sticks, paper, bags—and see who can make a parachute that helps the egg float instead of splat.

Try it: Egg Parachutes at JDaniels4mom.com

3. Humpty Dumpty drop

eggs for an egg drop in baggies with materials to protect them

First, decorate an egg like Humpty Dumpty (smiley face, overalls). Then, fill baggies with different materials like water beads, sand, pasta, and cotton balls. Drop Humpty in and see which material protects him the best.

Try it: Humpty Dumpty Drop at I Heart Crafty Things

4. Hot-air balloon egg drop

girl holding a basket attached to a balloon for an egg drop

Connect a “basket” to a balloon with yarn and see whether or not the balloon will float gently enough so the egg doesn’t break. You may try this in different types of weather to see what happens to the balloon and egg when it’s windy or not.

Try it: Gravity Drop at Science Sparks

5. Crash cart egg race

In this version of an egg drop, build a cart for an egg, then send each egg down a ramp or course to see if the cart will protect the egg.

6. Cereal egg drop

egg-packed-in-can-and-cereal

Another lesson in how energy gets absorbed. Place an egg in a can, and surround the can with a soft cereal, like puffed rice.

Try it: Cereal Egg Drop on Pinterest

7. Dodecahedron egg drop

a dodecahedron made from straws for an egg drop challenge

Create a dodecahedron out of straws, place an egg in the middle, and drop it. Will the straw structure protect the egg enough for it not to break? Bonus: Students learn about geometry and dodecahedrons.

Try it: Straw Egg Drop at Sciencing

8. Styrofoam cup egg drop

materials for a styrofoam egg drop challenge

Use Styrofoam cups to create a stack around the egg. Place a heavy rock in the bottom of the first cup (the rock should be heavier than the egg). Then, put six more cups on top, put the egg into the seventh cup, and cover the stack with the eighth. Tape the stack together and drop.

Try it: Styrofoam Egg Drop at Educational Insights

9. Rubber band suspension egg drop

Suspend an egg using rubber bands and pantyhose for protection. Will the egg bounce and wiggle or crack on impact?

10. Paper straws egg drop

egg drop challenge idea using only paper

Sometimes having limited materials brings out students’ creativity. Give students nothing but an egg, paper, and scissors, and see what they can come up with.

Try it: Paper Egg Drop at iGameMom

11. Pringles can egg drop

A Pringles can is the perfect size and shape to protect an egg. Use cushioning and pencils to hold the egg in place.

12. Sponge egg drop

an egg covered in a sponge and reinforced with straws and tape for an egg drop challenge idea

Cut a hole in the middle of a sponge and fit the egg into the hole. Then, use straws and tape to secure the egg and see if the sponge will soften the blow.

Try it: Sponge Egg Drop at Green Kid Crafts

13. Paper bag parachute

egg in a cup with a plastic bag parachute for an egg drop challenge

Looking for more ideas that incorporate parachutes in your egg drop challenge? Place the egg in a red Solo cup with some cushioning (shredded paper, cotton). Then, attach a plastic bag to the cup and launch it in a place where the wind can catch the bag.

Try it: Plastic Bag Parachute Egg Drop at There’s Just One Mommy

14. Toilet paper and duct tape egg drop

Tuck an egg into a roll of toilet paper, pack with cotton balls, and cover with duct tape. You could use this strategy to drop the egg, or roll it down an obstacle course.

15. Oobleck-wrapped egg challenge

For a mult-step approach, make oobleck and cover the egg in oobleck. Then, put the egg in a cup that includes a soft packing material (mini-marshmallows, cotton balls). Cover the top with plastic wrap or tape and get ready to drop.

16. Ship egg drop

egg drop project tissue box

Give students a collection of materials and challenge them to make ships to protect their eggs. Some materials:

  • Popsicle sticks or tongue depressors
  • Rubber bands
  • Pipe cleaners
  • Cotton balls
  • Sandwich bags

Try it: Ship Egg Drop at Cool Science Dad

17. Pool noodle egg drop

pool noodles protecting eggs for an egg drop

What can’t you do with pool noodles? Cut pool noodles into parts and use duct tape, rubber bands, and other materials to create soft, spongy pods for eggs.

Try it: Pool Noodle Egg Drop at Steam Powered Family

18. Toilet paper roll egg drop

egg drop project tissue box

Use toilet paper rolls as pillars to support and protect an egg, then use a sponge and rubber bands to hold it together. The big question with this egg drop is whether it will float down or crash.

Try it: Toilet Paper Egg Drop at Science Struck

19. Water bag egg drop

a bag of water with an egg in it for an egg drop idea

What happens if you put eggs in a bag full of water? Have students hypothesize whether the eggs will break based on how much water is in the bag.

Try it: Water Bag Egg Drop at Oregon State University

20. Reinforcement egg drop

egg in a box with a jar and rubber bands for an egg drop idea

Talk about what it means to reinforce an object, then provide students with different ways to reinforce an egg in boxes or jars (or jars and boxes).

Try it: Reinforcement Egg Drop at Living Digitally

21. Floam-covered egg

egg covered in floam for an egg drop idea

Cover an egg in floam and see if it provides enough cushioning to break the fall. If you don’t have floam, you can also try kinetic sand, play dough, or anything that will cover the egg and absorb the impact.

Try it: Floam Egg Drop at Momtastic

22. Peanut butter jar egg drop

peanut butter jar tied to a box with rubber bands

Tuck an egg in a peanut butter jar, pack it with tissues, and secure in a box.

Try it: Peanut Butter Jar Egg Drop at Momtastic

23. Balloon bomb egg drop

Surround the egg in balloons filled with beads to provide a softer landing.

24. Another balloon bomb

child holding an egg drop challenge, a foam surrounded by balloons

Hollow out a floral foam disc and tuck the egg inside. Then, add balloons to soften the landing.

Try it: Balloon Bomb Egg Drop at The Caffeinated Homeschoolista

25. Bungee egg drop

egg drop project tissue box

This activity isn’t an egg drop, per say. Students use rubber bands to create a bungee jump for an egg and predict how many rubbers bands they will need for the egg to drop a certain length (maybe six feet). For students who are well versed in the egg drop, this is a fun spin on the idea.

Try it: Bungee Egg Drop at Museum of Science and Industry

26. Backyard egg drop

egg drop made with sticks and twine

Looking for ideas to make the egg drop project more challenging? Ask students to find materials in nature—sticks, leaves, an abandoned bird’s nest—to create their egg drop structures.

Try it: Nature Egg Drop at Dream Big at Home

If you like these egg drop challenge ideas and want more articles like this,  be sure to subscribe to our newsletters.

Plus, check out 50 stem activities to help kids think outside the box ..

The egg drop is a must-do experiment. Here are all the egg drop ideas you need to challenge students from hypothesis to the big drop.

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Egg Drop Project Ideas That Really Work

By Kelly Ladd Sanchez

What is the egg drop project?

If you have young kids and haven’t heard of the egg drop project yet, you definitely will in the next few years. Kids ranging from elementary school through high school age are being assigned a science ( STEM ) project, where they will have to use their ingenuity to design a package out of everyday items that will keep an egg from breaking when dropped from ten feet in the air. (Of course, some teachers, especially for older kids, may have different requirements for the assignment.)

The idea of the of the egg drop project is to use as few materials as possible to make the packaging strong enough to withstand the fall. Some teachers may also place a time limit and weight limit on the project.

My parents live on the seventh floor of a condo. Over the summer, my son Kai spent a week with them. The egg drop challenge was one of the many projects he and his grandpa did together. They made their contraption using a grocery bag parachute and mini box filled with lots of cotton balls for padding. It didn’t crack! Kai dropped it over the railing so many times.

Here are some of the items and materials that can be used in the egg drop project:

  • Masking tape
  • Toilet paper
  • Plastic bags

Looking to get some help brainstorming ideas for the challenge? Look no further. Here are a few egg drop project ideas that really work, even from extreme heights. Check them out in the slideshow.

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Egg Drop Challenge Ideas That Work

Gentle touch down.

Gentle Touch Down

Using balloons for a soft touch down is a smart idea. This student even fills a balloon with glass craft gems , which help guide the contraption down to the ground. Pure genius! Get the project details . Photo credit: My Little Homestead

Peanut Butter Jar Success

Peanut Butter Jar Success

The fourth grader who created this project had even more rules to her project. She wasn’t allowed to use parachutes, balloons, bubble wrap, or Styrofoam. So she lined the inside of an empty peanut butter jar with foam squares and placed the egg inside. She then suspended the jar in a box using rubber bands .  Get the project details. Photo credit: Living Digitally

Preschool Egg Drop Ideas

Preschool Egg Drop Ideas

Who says this experiment is only for school aged kids? Get your preschooler’s creativity revved up with some creative ideas. Our favorite experiment: Wrapping the egg in store-bought Floam and then placing it inside a shoebox filled with crinkled paper . This project is sure to get your little ones excited about science. Photo credit: Parent Savvy

Balloon Bomb

Balloon Bomb

Using hallowed out floral foam and balloons, your egg is sure to be safe. The foam helps protect the eggs, while the balloons give the package some air resistance. Bombs away! Get the project details. Photo credit: The Caffeinated Homeschoolista

Creativity Counts

Creativity Counts

When it comes to protecting the egg, you’ve got to be creative. This family even used cloth diaper inserts. Use things you have around the house to cushion the fall! Make a parachute or balloon from a trash bag to help soften the blow. Check out the video to see how it really does work. Get the project details. Photo credit: Steamsational

Record Your Results

Record Your Results

We love these ideas mostly because of how the family recorded all of the data. The kids recorded predictions as well as the results for each of their many experiments. They figured out that packing paper, multi-wrapped bubble wrap, and a cardboard box with packing material was the best egg protection. Score! Photo credit: Parent Teach Play

Epic Fails and Epic Wins

Epic Fails and Epic Wins

Looking for some creative ideas to help your child’s egg drop challenge to be a success? Check out these ideas—some worked (like placing an egg in a toilet paper roll with the tube taken out); some, unfortunately, did not (like placing an egg in a bag full of marshmallows ). You win some, you lose some.  Get the project details. Photo credit: Homeschool Creations

#1 YouTube Video

#1 YouTube Video

With 27 million views, Mark Rober’s "Egg Drop Project" video is by far the most popular one on YouTube. It shows five different design ideas. Beware: Since this is the number one egg drop video, many other kids in your class may use similar designs. Get the project details. Photo credit: Mark Rober

Egg Drop Soup

Egg Drop Soup

Here’s an inventive idea that worked the first round but may need some extra protection if you plan on using a lot of force. Hollow out a sea sponge and place your egg inside. Then add extra cotton for more cushion and place it in a cute Chinese take-out container . Fingers crossed your egg doesn't turn into egg drop soup. Get the project details. Photo credit: Follow Greg

Try, Try, and Try Again

Try, Try, and Try Again

Sometimes in science, failing is just as important as accomplishments because it helps you understand the big question: WHY? Check out this idea as something not to do and most importantly find out why it didn’t work. Get the project details. Photo credit: Feels Like Home

Bombs Away!

Bombs Away!

There are always some failures before there are successes! That’s exactly what happened to these two projects, which used a parachute made from a coffee filter and a grocery bag. These kids had to make a few adjustments to their designs before they worked. Get the project details. Photo credit: Lemon Lime Adventures

No Break Egg

No Break Egg

Cover a raw egg with tissue paper and bubble wrap . Then tape it together until it's secure. (Use colorful duct tape to give the project extra pizazz.) Get the project details. Photo credit: Kids Activities

Simple Egg Drop Success

Simple Egg Drop Success

Here’s an egg drop experiment video perfect for younger elementary school students. Simply stuff a box with packing peanuts , stick an egg in the middle, and let it drop. Easy peasy and totally doable. Get the project details. Photo credit: Planning Playtime

Science Is Fun

Science Is Fun

Here are some fun ideas (only one of which worked) that some older kids experimented with. Their winning idea: placing an egg inside of a hallowed out grapefruit. (We don’t recommend climbing on top of the roof, though.) Get the project details. Photo credit: BullsFan7777777

Survived a Twenty-Foot Drop

Survived a Twenty-Foot Drop

Here’s a design that withstood a twenty-foot drop. This ingenious plan has a space made specifically for the egg in a cardboard box stuffed with paper towels. Straws and rubber bands are wrapped around the box for added support. Creativity counts! Get the project details. Photo credit: MyGamingJourney_Skye

Kelly Ladd Sanchez

Kelly Ladd Sanchez, a former magazine editor and writer, now works as a professional craft stylist and paper artist out of her home studio in Orlando, Florida. Kelly is always creating something whimsical, bright, and colorful, with easy-to-follow instructions. Looking for more creative and fun DIY and craft projects to try yourself? Check out Kelly's blog, handmadebykelly.com  and her paper art site . When she’s not covered in little shreds of paper, she can be found having fun and hanging out with her son and wonderful husband. Follow her on Facebook , Instagram , Twitter  and Pinterest. 

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Awesome Egg Drop Ideas

Take the egg drop challenge for an awesome  STEM project for young kids and older ones too! Your imagination is the limit with these cleverly styled egg drop designs as you investigate what makes for the best shock absorber for dropping an egg.  Read on to find out how the egg drop challenge works and what are the best materials for an egg drop. We have tons more STEM activities for you to try!

egg drop ideas for kids to try

Take the Egg Drop Challenge

Create your own egg drop designs to protect your egg from breaking when it is dropped from a height. 

Egg drop challenges are super cool and make for terrific STEM activities! I have been waiting to do a classic egg drop project for some time with my son but felt like he was too young.

The goal of the egg drop challenge is to drop your egg from a height without it breaking when it hits the ground.

Most egg drop projects use many loose materials, design making, and tinkering that my son isn’t ready for yet. I thought we could expand on it by using materials in our kitchen to protect the eggs including ziptop bags to control the mess.

What else can you do with eggs? Watch the video!

Grab the FREE Printable Egg Drop Worksheets!

egg drop project tissue box

What are the Best Materials for an Egg Drop?

We have two versions of this egg drop challenge below, one for older kids and one for younger kids. Do you need real eggs? Usually, I would say yes, but given the circumstances, how about candy-filled plastic eggs ? If you don’t want to waste food for any reason, don’t! Find a workaround instead.

Egg Drop Ideas for Older Kids

Older kiddos will love coming up with ideas to protect the egg in an egg drop. Certainly, egg drop designs can be more involved the older a kid gets making this a great activity to try each year. Some materials they may want to use…

  • Packaging materials
  • Old t-shirts or rags
  • Recycling container goodies
  • And so much more!

Here’s a past year’s winner in the egg drop challenge! It even included a plastic bag parachute!

egg drop project tissue box

Egg Drop Ideas for Younger Kids

You will need eggs and plastic ziptop bags to contain the mess! How many is up to you. We had 7 bags left, so we came up with six items from around the kitchen to fill the bags and protect the eggs and one with nothing.

I tried to pick items that weren’t too wasteful, and we had a few expired and unused items in the pantry.  Some materials you could use to protect the egg…

  • paper towels
  • dry cereal {we used very old wheat puffs}

Egg Drop Challenge Set Up Egg Zip Locks Bags Cereal Ice Water Paper Cups

Best Egg Drop Design Ideas

Here are 10 simple egg drop design ideas for kids to try.

TIP: Tape and rubber bands are great to have on hand for securing constructions.

1. Parachute Design

Attach a parachute made from a plastic bag or thin fabric to slow down the descent of the egg. Experiment with different parachute sizes and shapes.

Materials: Plastic bags, fabric scraps, tissue paper.

2. Cup and String Contraption

Suspend the egg inside a cup using strings or rubber bands. The cup absorbs some of the impact, and the strings provide additional support.

Materials: Paper cups, rubber bands, string or yarn.

3. Bubble Wrap Encasement

Wrap the egg in several layers of bubble wrap to provide cushioning and protection. Secure the bubble wrap with tape.

Materials: Bubble wrap, packing peanuts, tissue paper.

4. Straw Structure

Create a protective structure using straws. Arrange the straws to form a cage around the egg, leaving enough space for the egg to be cradled safely.

Materials: Plastic or paper straws.

5. Balloon Cushioning

Inflate a balloon and tape it securely around the egg. The balloon acts as a cushion during the fall.

Materials: Regular balloons.

6. Cotton Ball Padding

Surround the egg with a thick layer of cotton balls or cotton padding. This can absorb some of the impact forces upon landing.

Materials: Cotton balls, cotton pads, sponge, foam padding.

7. Foam Container

Place the egg inside a small foam container, such as a foam cup or takeout container. The foam absorbs and disperses the impact energy.

Materials: Plastic containers, foam cups, paper cups, small boxes.

8. Paper Mache Shell

Create a protective shell for the egg using paper mache. The hardened shell provides a protective barrier against impact.

Materials: Newspapers, flour, water.

9. Cardboard Tube Construction

Use cardboard tubes (toilet paper rolls or paper towel rolls) to create a protective structure around the egg. Arrange the tubes to form a cradle for the egg.

Materials: Cardboard sheets, cardboard tubes.

10. Feathered Landing

Attach feathers to the egg to slow down its descent. The feathers create drag, reducing the speed at which the egg falls.

Materials: Bird feathers or craft feathers.

Remember to encourage students to test and refine their designs. They can vary the drop height or make adjustments to improve the performance of their egg drop contraptions. Additionally, discussing the science behind each design choice can add to the learning experience.

Make It An Egg Drop Experiment

Want to turn this fun science activity into a science fair project? Then, you will want to check out these helpful resources.

  • Easy Science Fair Projects
  • Science Project Tips From A Teacher
  • Science Fair Board Ideas

Here are some ideas to remember to change the variables for an egg drop science fair project.

Standard Egg Drop : Start with the classic challenge where students must design a contraption to protect a raw egg from breaking when dropped from a certain height. They can experiment with different materials and shapes for their protective devices.

Materials Investigation : Have students investigate the properties of different materials. Ask them to design a container for the egg using various materials like paper, cardboard, plastic, and foam. Then, compare which material offers the best protection.

Shape Experiment : Explore the impact of the shape of the container on the egg’s safety. Students can create different shapes, such as cubes, spheres, or pyramids, and see which one works best.

Parachute Design : Challenge students to design a parachute system that slows down the egg’s descent. This adds an aerodynamics element to the project.

Weight Constraint : Introduce the maximum weight constraint for the entire contraption. This requires students to think about the trade-off between protection and weight.

Altitude Variations : Change the height from which the egg is dropped. Ask students to adjust their designs for different drop heights and explain how they made these adjustments.

Add These STEM Questions for Reflection

These STEM questions for reflection are perfect to use with older kiddos to talk about how the project went and what they might do differently next time around. Use these questions for reflection with your kids after they have completed the STEM challenge to encourage discussion of results and critical thinking .

—> Get the printable STEM questions list here .

  • What were some of the challenges you discovered along the way?
  • What worked well and what did not work well?
  • What part of your model or prototype do you really like? Explain why.
  • What part of your model or prototype needs improvement? Explain why.
  • What other materials would you like to use if you could do this challenge again?
  • What would you do differently next time?
  • What parts of your model or prototype are similar to the real world version?

Check Our Our Egg Drop Experiment

The first egg drop challenge had to be the egg in the zip-top bag. We had to ensure the bag wasn’t protecting the egg, right? Crash and splat went that egg drop. Since it’s already in a bag, I might as well squish it around!

Egg Drop Ideas

We continued with the egg drop challenge, testing each bag and then examining the contents. This egg drop project had some clear winners!

IDEAS THAT FAILED!

Obviously, the egg did not fair well with no protection. It also didn’t make it through an egg drop in water or ice. Note: We tried the water twice! Once with 8 cups and once with 4 cups.

Egg Drop Project with Water Ice Nothing

EGG DROP IDEAS THAT WORKED!

However, the egg drop did make it through the crazy cup contraption. We were all impressed. It also made it through a drop in a bag of cereal. The egg, however, did not fare well in the paper towels. He didn’t think the towels were thick enough!

It would be a great egg drop project idea to explore: how to drop an egg without breaking it using paper!

Egg Drop Activity Egg Science Cup Cereal Paper Towels

We concluded the egg drop challenge, with a bag of flour mix. {This was very old gluten-free mix we will never use}. The flour was “soft” apparently making for great protection against the fall.

egg drop idea with flour

More Egg Science Activities

Get the eggs ready for more simple science projects to explore chemistry, biology, and physics!

  • Do Eggs Float?
  • Make A Bouncy Egg
  • Test the strength of eggshells
  • Get an egg into a bottle

egg drop project tissue box

More Favorite STEM Challenges

Straw Boats Challenge – Design a boat made from nothing but straws and tape, and see how many items it can hold before it sinks.

How Strong Is An Egg – Test much weight one egg can hold before it breaks.

Strong Spaghetti – Get out the pasta and test our your spaghetti bridge designs. Which one will hold the most weight?

Paper Bridges – Similar to our strong spaghettti challenge. Design a paper bridge with folded paper. Which one will hold the most coins?

Paper Chain STEM Challenge – One of the simplest STEM challenges ever!

Spaghetti Marshmallow Tower – Build the tallest spaghetti tower that can hold the weight of a jumbo marshmallow.

Strong Paper – Experiment with folding paper in different ways to test its strength, and learn about what shapes make the strongest structures.

Marshmallow Toothpick Tower – Build the tallest tower using only marshmallows and toothpicks.

Penny Boat Challenge – Design a simple tin foil boat, and see how many pennies it can hold before it sinks.

Gumdrop B ridge – Build a bridge from gumdrops and toothpicks and see how much weight it can hold.

Cup Tower Challenge – Make the tallest tower you can with 100 paper cups.

Paper Clip Challenge – Grab a bunch of paper clips and make a chain. Are paper clips strong enough to hold weight?

egg drop project tissue box

Printable STEM Pack for Kids

80+ Doable Engineering Projects in one convenient pack!

  • Full instructions with sample images
  • Activity-specific instruction sheets
  • Data Collection Sheets
  • Questions for Reflection
  • Architecture Building Cards: Try the tallest tower challenge
  • Bridge Building Cards: Explore different types of bridges to build your own.
  • Paper Chain STEM Challenge: Who can make the longest chain? Great icebreaker or quick challenge!
  • 3 Little Pigs Architectural Pack: Design a house that won’t blow away!
  • Great marshmallow challenge: A classic challenge kids love!
  • Real-world STEM challenge lesson but don’t know where to start? Our easy-to-follow template shows the steps!
  • What’s the difference between a scientist and an engineer?
  • Crossword and word search with engineering vocabulary.
  • Engineering vocabulary cards
  • Design a one-of-a-kind invention and write about it with this 5-page activity!

egg drop project tissue box

you worry too much about what people will think do your experiments and be happy who cares if you wasted a couple eggs. it was good clean fun with your kids.

Did any of the bags burst open? I’m interesting in leading this for a library program and need to figure out where we should drop the bags.

There was no catastrophic bag opening. I would suggest making sure the air is out of the bag first. You could also drop it into a plastic bin. Also go with quality zip top bags if you are worried. Have fun with it!

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The Ultimate Egg Drop Engineering Project

Categories Engineering Activities

When I was a kid, we had a book about this egg drop engineering project , and ever since then, I have wanted to try it. We live on the third floor, so we have quite a long drop from our balcony, which is perfect for this experiment.

If you don’t live in an apartment or have a second story, you might be able to test your eggs by tossing them off your roof. The egg drop challenge is one of our favorite engineering activities for kids!

We’ve also tried a turkey egg drop that was tons of fun!

Learn the basics of engineering with the egg drop engineering project! This egg drop engineering challenge gives several ideas for the egg drop project, including a hot air balloon egg drop. It's a super fun STEM activity and engineering challenge for kids! #stemactivities #stem #stemed #engineering #engineeringactivities #kidsactivities

How to Do the Egg Drop Engineering Project

The egg drop engineering challenge is one of our favorite engineering activities!

The goal of this project is to create a container that will safely deposit a raw egg onto the ground when it is dropped from something high.

Egg Drop STEM Challenge Ideas

Let kids be as creative in their designs as they want.  You might want to include some design challenges like they must use a cardboard box, their design must fly, or they have to use sponges.

You could also require that the designs be a certain size, such as under 10 inches.

Make your egg drop have a theme, like in our turkey Egg Drop Project with Popsicle Sticks .

Another fun twist is to try dropping the eggs from different heights. The egg padding that withstands the most tumbling is the winner!

Learn the basics of engineering with the egg drop engineering project! This egg drop engineering challenge gives several ideas for the egg drop project, including a hot air balloon egg drop. It's a super fun STEM activity and engineering challenge for kids! #stemactivities #stem #stemed #engineering #engineeringactivities #kidsactivities

The Science Behind the Egg Drop Challenge

I love the egg drop engineering project because it involves creativity mixed with a bit of physics.

The force of the fall and the impact breaks the egg. But with enough design adaptations, you can prevent an egg from breaking at almost any speed!

There are probably hundreds of designs that will keep the egg safe.

With a group of children, it would be fun to see what differing designs could be successful in keeping the eggs from breaking.

The more types of designs tested the better!

What You Need for Egg Drop Designs

You’ll need these supplies for the egg drop engineering challenge.

free science lesson plans

  • Raw eggs (buy some cheap ones so you can make multiple attempts)
  • Various containers and padding
  • We used bubble wrap, cotton balls, plastic trash bags, plastic food containers, string, tape, plastic bags, and egg crates

How to Set Up an Egg Drop Engineering Project

Learn the basics of engineering with the egg drop engineering project! This egg drop engineering challenge gives several ideas for the egg drop project, including a hot air balloon egg drop. It's a super fun STEM activity and engineering challenge for kids! #stemactivities #stem #stemed #engineering #engineeringactivities #kidsactivities

Follow these steps to make your own egg drop STEM challenge!

Idea 1: How to prevent an egg from breaking when dropped with straws

Learn the basics of engineering with the egg drop engineering project! This egg drop engineering challenge gives several ideas for the egg drop project, including a hot air balloon egg drop. It's a super fun STEM activity and engineering challenge for kids! #stemactivities #stem #stemed #engineering #engineeringactivities #kidsactivities

In this version, I challenged the kids to create a cage for their egg out of straws.

Learn the basics of engineering with the egg drop engineering project! This egg drop engineering challenge gives several ideas for the egg drop project, including a hot air balloon egg drop. It's a super fun STEM activity and engineering challenge for kids! #stemactivities #stem #stemed #engineering #engineeringactivities #kidsactivities

It was a pretty good design!

Learn the basics of engineering with the egg drop engineering project! This egg drop engineering challenge gives several ideas for the egg drop project, including a hot air balloon egg drop. It's a super fun STEM activity and engineering challenge for kids! #stemactivities #stem #stemed #engineering #engineeringactivities #kidsactivities

Even though we only dropped it from the second story, I bet the design would have held up from even higher up.

Idea 2: How to prevent an egg from breaking when dropped

Monkey thought she could create a little nest for the egg like in a hot air balloon. She used the trash bag as the balloon and placed the egg in a plastic ice cream dish.

Learn the basics of engineering with the egg drop engineering project! Part of the 31 days fo STEM activities for kids series.

She padded the bottom of the egg, but not the sides.

When we dropped the egg, it fell onto its side and exploded.

Idea 3: Balloon egg drop design

Monkey expanded on the hot air balloon design, but this time, she made the container holding the egg larger.

She padded the egg in several layers of padding, including a plastic bag blown up to create an air pocket. She taped the container to the trash bag balloon.

Learn the basics of engineering with the egg drop engineering project! Part of the 31 days fo STEM activities for kids series.

When we dropped this package, it still fell pretty heavily (I’m not sure the balloon part was necessary), but the padding prevented the egg from breaking.

If you do the egg drop engineering project, share your results with us! We would love to see your creations!

elementary stem challenge cards

More Engineering Activities for Kids

Summer Skies Marshmallow Constellations Engineering Activity for Kids

20+ Simple Lego Engineering Challenges Kids Can Do Alone!

6 Easy and Fun Engineering Projects for Kids

Pool noodle engineering wall

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Successful Egg Drop Contraptions for a Science Project

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Egg Drop Ideas to Not Make an Egg Break From the Height of a School ...

The egg drop project is a classic challenge in the engineering sciences: how to drop an egg from a height without it breaking. Solutions have included packing materials, parachutes, soft landing zones and even something known as an "oobleck" cushion. There are several tried-and-true methods for protecting your fragile content from the impact of a fall, but perhaps you'll come up with a new approach that will be even more successful.

A box of cereal and some plastic bags are all you really need to make a successful egg drop contraption. Light, crispy cereal, such as crispy rice cereal, works particularly well because it crushes easily. Fill four or five sandwich bags with cereal and place these around the egg inside a larger plastic bag, ensuring the egg is cushioned on all sides. This should work well for a standard two-story drop, but use larger bags and more cereal as the height of the drop increases. When the bag hits the ground, the impact of the landing is absorbed and distributed throughout the cereal. You’ll probably end up with a bag of crushed cereal, but the egg should be unbroken.

Egg Parachute

People are able to jump from planes with parachutes and land on the ground safely because the parachute creates air resistance, which works against the force of gravity to slow the rate of the fall. The same principle can be applied to create successful egg drop contraptions. Place the egg in a lightweight box with a lid and tie the parachute to the box with some thread. You can also try using a plastic grocery bag for the parachute and adding padding to the box. Remember that the larger and heavier the container, the larger the parachute will need to be to protect the egg. This may not work so well with egg drops of only a few feet, because the parachute needs time to open and generate air resistance.

Oobleck Cushion

"Oobleck" is a nickname given to a mixture of corn starch and water that forms a non-Newtonian fluid, i.e., a fluid whose flow does not have a constant value of viscosity. When it is at rest or when you apply gentle pressure to the fluid, it acts as a liquid, but it quickly becomes a solid when under more pressure. To make the contraption, combine two parts corn starch with one part water to fill a quart-size plastic bag. Then simply stick the egg inside the bag and let it fall to the ground. When the bag hits the ground, the oobleck forms a solid around the egg so that the force of the fall is evenly distributed around the shell's surface.

A simple padded box may likely be the most common successful egg drop contraption. The box you use should crush on impact, so use a material like cardboard instead of plastic or metal. You can line a box with any cushion or soft material, such as foam, sponges, bubble paper, cotton or marshmallows. Egg crate foam works particularly well, because its shape is perfect for holding the egg in place. Ensure that you have enough padding in the box to cover the egg evenly on all sides. When the box hits the ground, the force will cause the box to crush, which absorbs much of the shock of the fall. The force is also evenly distributed throughout and absorbed by the cushioning material.

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  • Almost Unschoolers: Non-Newtonian Fluid Egg Drop Protection

About the Author

A former cake decorator and competitive horticulturist, Amelia Allonsy is most at home in the kitchen or with her hands in the dirt. She received her Bachelor's degree from West Virginia University. Her work has been published in the San Francisco Chronicle and on other websites.

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Egg Drop Ideas to Not Make an Egg Break From the Height of a School Building

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Egg Drop Project

Can You Drop an Egg without Breaking It? The egg drop challenge is a classic but it never ceases to amaze the kids, and I am always amazed with their ingenuity! With STEM we are always working to build creativity, problem solving skills, curiosity, and a passion for experimentation and learning. The Egg Drop Project is the perfect Summer STEM project for developing all of those areas. So let’s dig into this wildly popular activity.

Egg Drop Project Ideas

What you will discover in this article!

Egg Drop Project Designs and Ideas

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With an egg drop project it always seems like the contraptions that you’re sure will fail, somehow keep that egg perfectly safe. Then the ones that seem indestructible, end up with egg all over! What makes a good egg drop experiment in my mind is a little bit of direction and a lot of freedom. Kids will copy just about anything you show them, but given the freedom to problem solve on their own is always a joy to watch.

I highly recommend doing this project outside or somewhere that allows for easy clean up. Dropped eggs can really splatter everywhere! You may also want to avoid this activity on really hot, sunny days, to avoid the splattered raw egg cooking before you can clean it up. If you want to try cooking some eggs on those hot days, check out our Solar Oven Project .

Egg Drop Project Supplies

What Do We Need?

Raw Eggs (and lots of them!)

Plastic Easter Eggs (optional but great for the planning and prep work)

Building Materials , this is where you want to raid your tinker kits , recycling bins, cupboards and really encourage kids to get creative! Here are a few ideas to get you started.

  • Cut up Pool Noodles
  • Cardboard Tubes
  • Cardboard boxes (smaller ones, like shoe boxes or tissue boxes)
  • Plastic containers (like yogurt containers)
  • Packing Peanuts or other packing materials
  • Rubberbands
  • Plastic Cups
  • Zip Top Bags
  • Craft Sticks
  • Cotton Balls
  • Old shirts or pieces of fabric

You may also need:

Tape (clear tape, duct tape) Glue (school glue, glue sticks, glue gun) Scissors Hobby knife Markers

Inquiry Questions for Students

Start with some questions and a conversation to get your kids thinking like scientists and STEMists. Also, don’t be afraid to have kids use the Scientific Method to reinforce learning this powerful approach to experimentation.

Here are some questions and conversation prompts for you.

What happens when you drop an egg? This is a great time to talk about potential and kinetic energy.

What will happen if I drop an egg on the floor? If you’re feeling brave you could even drop an egg and let them see the mess and how fragile the shell is!

What causes the egg to break when it hits the ground?

What might we be able to do to prevent an egg from breaking? How can we protect it?

Could you build a contraption that would protect an egg? What would that look like?

What are some important things that you should consider when building?

You could also explore the parts of the egg and challenge kids to make Bouncy Eggs using chemistry . This could be a fun experiment to do, while doing the egg drop project. The result is an egg with no shell that bounces. A super cool experiment to do with the Egg Drop.

Bouncy rubber egg in vinegar experiment

Science Vocabulary

This is a perfect opportunity to talk about some science vocabulary and the physics behind the egg drop!

Potential Energy: The energy an object may have based on its size and position.

Kinetic Energy: The energy of motion.

Gravity: The force that pulls objects to earth.

Velocity: How fast an object moves as it falls.

Momentum: the way an object will speed up as it is falling and continue until it meets an outside force – like the ground.

Collision: When two objects run into one another causing a change in energy and momentum.

Newton’s 3rd Law of Motion: Action & Reaction: For every action in nature there is an equal and opposite reaction. If an object (egg) exerts a force on another object (the ground), the ground also exerts an equal and opposite force on the egg. For more projects on Newton’s Laws check out Balloon Rocket Physics or our Pinball Machine Project .

Egg Drop Project Step 1 – Design

I like to have students draw out their designs – making note of what they think is important to protect the egg. I let them look at the materials we have to work with so they have some direction. Some things to take into consideration are how can we slow the fall of the egg once it is released and how might we be able to protect the egg once it hits the ground. Once they have their design they need to bring me a materials list of what they need to build their design.

A simple egg drop design using pool noodles

Egg Drop Project Step 2 – Build

Students are given a plastic egg for measuring purposes and the materials that they requested. I give them a set amount of time to build. It is good to stress here that they need to be able to remove their plastic egg and add an actual egg before the drop. The build process will inevitably present issues that the students will need to work with and adapt. This is all part of the process and encourages students to problem solve as they go.

Egg Drop Project Step 1 – Test

This is the fun part – I had students drop their eggs over a 2nd story railing. (With supervision at the top and bottom!) Sometimes you will hear a crack, but other times there is a lot of anticipation to see the results when you reveal the inside of the egg drop designs.

Student Dropping an Egg in an Egg Drop Project at School

This part is always exciting! It’s a great time to ask students some questions. Do they predict the egg survived or not? How did the fall or the landing influence your prediction?

Then gather round and check the eggs!

Egg Drop Fail is a Chance to Learn and Try Again

It’s always funny to me how this turns out – the one contraption this time that I was sure would fail was by far the best egg drop design this year. This particular student had no interest in the suggestions of his classmates and simply wrapped the egg in pieces of pool noodle and rubber bands. The student didn’t really listen and hurled the egg over the railing rather than dropping it – I was sure we would all be covered with egg yolk and surprisingly his contraption just bounced and the egg was perfectly fine. While the student who made a meticulous soft cocoon of cotton balls and had a parachute to slow her fall ended up with a broken egg.

If you would really like to check out an amazing egg drop experiment that might not go the way you would think – check out the Egg Drop project using Oobleck – it’s a really cool out of the box way to try this challenge!

Oobleck Egg Drop Project

Egg Drop Final Step: Revise and Retest

I really enjoy leaving time to revise and retest designs whenever possible. It really helps encourage a growth mindset in the students – it’s the definite power of yet!

Have a blast with this classic STEM challenge with your students!

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egg drop project tissue box

Egg Drop Project

Have you ever wondered how to safely drop an egg from a height without breaking it? Try the egg drop challenge and find out if you can safely drop an egg without breaking it.

There are many cool and easy science experiments for kids to do at home or as a part of their school project. One such simple science experiment is the egg drop project. The egg drop project is also a fun activity to teach children about the laws of motion and gravity.

Here is a step-by-step guide to dropping an egg without breaking it.

Materials You Need For The Egg Drop Project

  • A Step-By-Step GuideTo Perform The Egg Drop Project

The Science Behind The Egg Drop Project

Other ideas to ace the egg drop project, why should you do the egg drop project.

The egg drop project does need a few materials. But they are inexpensive materials you can find at home or in a craft store.  You can make it more challenging for the kids and tell them to use as few materials as possible to perform the egg drop project. Here are the instructions to build an easy egg drop device, which will ensure a successful egg drop experiment. 

Here is a list of things you’ll need for an easy egg drop device to ace the egg drop challenge. 

  • An extra-large sized Ziploc bag
  • Bubble wrap
  • Adhesive tape
  • Packing peanuts
  • A large empty plastic jar
  • A carton of eggs

Download Egg Drop Project Printable

A Step-By-Step Guide To Perform The Egg Drop Project  

Here is a step-by-step guide to building the easiest egg drop device. This device ensures that the egg doesn’t break when it’s dropped from a height.

Place a raw egg in the middle of a sheet of bubble wrap. Roll the bubble wrap around the egg several times. Seal the bubble wrap with some adhesive tape to ensure that the egg is securely wrapped.

Fill the plastic jar halfway with packing peanuts and place the egg in the middle. Add the rest of the packing peanuts into the jar until it’s filled. This provides good padding for the egg.

Wrap the jar in several layers of bubble wrap on all sides and secure it with adhesive tape.

Then, place the bubble-wrapped jar in the Ziploc bag. Ensure that the bubble-wrapped jar fits neatly inside the Ziploc bag.

Step 5 – Bombs Away!

Now, drop this Ziploc bag from a height and see if the egg breaks.

What is gravity?

Gravity is a force of attraction that pulls on a mass. The earth’s gravitational force is what keeps us standing on the ground. The same gravity is the reason that fruits fall from trees. This is also the reason a ball or egg that is thrown in the air falls back to the ground.

Why does the egg break when it is thrown from a height?

When an egg hits the ground, a collision occurs between the eggshell and the Earth. When this happens, the energy and the momentum of the egg and the Earth are transferred and their properties are changed. Many forces are responsible for this change and these strong forces cause the eggshell to break as it hits the ground.

Why doesn’t the egg break in a successful egg drop device?

The egg drop device provides good padding, which cushions the egg. This is the same concept as airbags in vehicles, which protect the passengers in an accident. The bubble wrap, packing peanuts in the jar, and Ziploc bag protect the egg by absorbing the impact when it hits the ground.

This is not the only way to perform the egg drop experiment. Place some yarn, adhesive tape, paper straws, popsicle sticks, Ziploc bags, trash bags, pipe cleaners, cotton balls, glue, rubber bands and eggs in front of the child. Ask them to experiment with the materials and come up with egg drop experiment ideas. Then tell them to use these ideas to build a device that ensures the egg doesn’t break when dropped. The egg drop challenge also helps children think outside the box to create a structure that prevents the egg from breaking. Place the materials in front of your child or the team of kids. Then challenge them to build a structure that holds the egg and prevents it from breaking. 

The best way for children to learn and understand science and develop an interest in it is through experimenting. When kids learn new things in a practical way, they can retain the information for a much longer time. This also keeps them engaged and helps them to develop an interest in the subject they are learning. Learning science can sometimes be confusing and at times it can be boring. Gravity and motion are one such subjects that can sometimes be too complex for kids to understand. 

The egg drop project is a great way to help kids understand these concepts quickly. The answer is to build a simple structure around the egg so that it doesn’t break even when it is dropped from a height. But, it is not as simple as it sounds. You might end up sacrificing a few eggs for the egg drop project. The design can be simple or complicated, but it should decrease the energy transferred to kinetic energy from potential energy on the eggshell. 

It can be a team activity or you and your kid can do it together. Additionally, the egg drop experiment is a great way to test your child’s creativity, imagination, and strategizing skills. Additionally, the experiment also teaches them physics concepts like gravity, motion, momentum etc. 

Frequently Asked Questions on Egg Drop Project

What are the items required for egg drop project.

The items required for the egg drop project are eggs, bubble wrap, a plastic jar, packing peanuts, a Ziploc bag, and adhesive tape.

What do children learn from Egg Drop Project?

When kids perform Egg Drop Project they learn about gravity and its important properties. Also understanding the reason behind the breakage of eggs when dropped from a certain height.

egg drop challenge with a completed whole egg dropped off the observatory roof

Egg Drop Challenge: An engineering based science project

Share this post:, a messy engineering challenge that fosters creativity, egg drop challenge for creative afternoons..

The egg drop project is one of those science projects that can really fluster kids. But it also really helps them think outside of the box and apply engineering skills. 

egg drop science experiment project - engineer with eggs

You don’t need much for the egg drop science project, not even a high place to drop from.

I’ve done this many times over the years, sometimes we have dropped the eggs from the roof of our local observatory, other times we just stood on a stool and dropped them onto a hard tile floor. 

Both times kids found the project incredibly challenging. Very few were successful on their first attempt, which meant they got some practice with the engineering process (ask, imagine, plan, create, improve).

It also gave us a chance to talk about failure, and how failure can teach you.

There are many constraints you can put on your egg drop challenge.

Size, weight, materials, use of parachutes etc can all scale this engineering challenge up for older learners, or down for younger learners. Two egg drop challenge examples are the egg drop challenge with your recycling bin, and the egg drop challenge using only straws and tape. Feel free to choose one, or make your own constraints!

Egg Drop Project Ingredients:

(for first time, or younger, learners)

  • Full recycling bin
  • Tall place to drop your eggs from

Egg Drop Challenge Ingredients:

(for experienced, or older, learners)

Tips for a successful egg drop project

  • Think about how to buffer the impact
  • Create a reusable project
  • Use hot glue or duct tape

1. Buffer the egg’s impact

egg drop experiment using recycled materials

A successful egg drop project means your egg has no cracks on it whatsoever when you take it out. Eggs are fragile. Drop it on its side or its top/bottom with no protection and it will break. 

If your egg drop experiment has protection on only one portion of the egg, you need to make sure there is a way to guarantee how the egg will descend to the ground as you are leaving yourself exposed.

You also want to think about how your egg will be buffered. Just before the egg hits the ground it is moving fairly quickly.

When it stops suddenly you need to absorb all of that kinetic energy (the energy of movement), ideally not into your beautiful pristine egg.

What is one big way to absorb a lot of kinetic energy quickly?

Into things that squish. It takes energy to deform a material, so the more material you can put in front of the egg to absorb the kinetic energy through deforming the better chance you have of your egg surviving. Things that squish could include bubble wrap, fabric, cardboard, paper scraps, airbags, straws that break etc. 

egg drop science project recycled materials boy working on egg drop engineering

When I did the egg drop experiment in 6th grade a long long time ago, I used a thick liquid to absorb a lot of the kinetic energy – peanut butter .

2. Create a reusable egg drop project.

Here’s the thing with engineering challenges – they rarely work the first time around. If your egg drop experiment can only be dropped once you won’t have the chance to go back, determine what part of the vehicle failed, and find a solution to make the next drop better. 

When I run programs with my kid’s classes the best way I do this is by telling them the egg has to be put in right before the drop. This prevents kids from wrapping them in duct tape – which has absolutely been tried and absolutely does not work. It also makes them think about where the egg will be secured.

egg drop science experiment prototype girl with yellow balloon and egg basket

Instead of building a project around the egg it helps the kids think about building the project for the egg.

A reusable experiment is also the key to making this a true engineering challenge. Kids should first ask what the goal is.

From there they imagine a solution to keep the egg safe, plan the project, and create it. Finally, they test it and go back through the loop. 

They ask why it didn’t work (or maybe why it did work), they imagine a solution to that new problem, plan the changes and create an updated vehicle.

Or maybe a new vehicle entirely if their egg drop project was an utter failure – but the goal is to edit and revise over a variety of trials, not just scrap it every time. You want to save the “trash it” method for projects that really didn’t work.

egg drop science experiment using duct tape, boys working together to engineer egg capsule

To be able to critically think about how the failure happened, and create a plan to fix it, you need an egg drop project that can be reused.

Trust me, having a project that you can edit and modify over a variety of trials really does impact their learning. It also helps them find success much faster.

3. Use hot glue or duct tape.

This is good advice for lots of engineering challenges. Why? Because liquid glues take a long time to cure, and they often aren’t nearly as strong as hot glue. Personally, I love hot glue for these types of projects because it is easy to apply, holds really well, is water resistant, and dries quickly. 

egg drop and engineering project failed with broken eggs

A good backup to hot glue is duct tape.

Duct tape probably got me my Ph.D. – that stuff can really stick. The problem with duct tape is that it can be hard to get two awkward pieces to join together at odd angles.

With your only resources coming from the recycling bin that can sometimes cause a little frustration. 

We want to keep all of their frustration for dealing with, and overcoming failure. 

egg drop challenge with a completed whole egg dropped off the observatory roof

Check out some of our other activities

egg drop science experiment project - engineer with eggs

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Buggy and Buddy

Meaningful Activities for Learning & Creating

March 29, 2013 By Chelsey

Egg Drop Challenge and Free Planning Printable

The egg drop challenge is one of my favorite science activities for kids ! I love all the critical thinking involved in this science activity, but my favorite part is the excitement kids feel when taking part!

Follow our Science for Kids Pinterest board!

Be sure to check out our other egg drop challenges for tips and ideas:.

  • Egg Drop Challenge 2016
  • Egg Drop Challenge 2015
  • Egg Drop Challenge 2014

eggdrop

Have you heard of the Egg Drop Challenge ? It’s such a fun way to incorporate critical thinking and problem solving into your home learning or classroom. 

Basically, the challenge is to create a container that will protect an egg from cracking or breaking from a high fall. You can make this as simple or complex as you want depending on the amount of time you have and the ages of kids you are working with. I love that this is such a rewarding experience for such a wide range of ages. And the kids always get super excited to do this project so get ready for lots of screams of delight!

(This is the perfect time of  year to do it too~ Although the challenge is usually done with raw eggs, you could still do it using some of the Easter eggs you never got around to eating or that you may have decorated with an inedible dye and don’t want to go to waste.)

IMG_0353

Materials for the Egg Drop Challenge

You can use anything you want! Listed below are just some examples of materials you could use.

  • cardboard tubes
  • tape, glue, rubberbands
  • popsicle sticks
  • cottonballs
  • Come up with an idea of some type of container you can make to protect an egg from a high fall.
  • Build your container and place the egg inside.
  • Drop the egg from someplace high. (Be sure it’s safe and an adult is with you.)
  • After you drop it look and see if your egg cracked or remained intact. (Remember to wash your hands after touching raw egg!)

Lucy creating her contraption from an old box and tissue paper.

Lucy creating her contraption from an old box and tissue paper.

I made mine out of the bottom of an old water bottle and some paper crinkles.

I made mine out of the bottom of an old water bottle and some paper crinkles.

Test #1: Dropping into the grass.

Test #1: Dropping into the grass.

Both eggs made it!

Both eggs made it!

Drop #2: Dropping onto the concrete. Both eggs broke. (To Lucy's delight!)

Drop #2: Dropping onto the concrete. Both eggs broke. (To Lucy’s delight!)

 Questions to Spark More Curiosity & Critical Thinking

Describe your design. Why do you think it will protect the egg? Did it work? Why or why not? How could you improve your design? 

Want to go even further?

Even more activities to inspire creativity and critical thinking for various ages.

  • Try  dropping the egg from increasing heights. Does it eventually stop working?
  • If your initial design did not work, redesign it and try to improve it. Can you get it work the next time?
  • Fill a box with a large amount of materials that could be used for this project. Then allow each child to only choose 3 items from the box to build their design.

Egg Drop with Fourth Grade

Later, we took this challenge to Daddy’s 4th grade classroom. The students brought in supplies from home and built their own containers in class. It was so fun to see what they came up with!

IMG_0352

brown paper bag, plastic bag, packing peanuts and leaves

IMG_0358

plastic container, packing peanuts, plastic bag

IMG_0355

cardboard box, packing peanuts, towel, string, stuffed bird (which the student stated was optional~ too cute!)

IMG_0347

Design with a plastic bag parachute attached

IMG_0356

Container with peanut butter (This survived the 3 foot drop, but didn’t survive the higher drop.)

After the students were finished planning building,  they placed their eggs inside their containers, and then we headed outside to test them.

For the first round the eggs were dropped from a height of about 7 feet. All but one egg made it past that drop. The second drop was about 11 feet high and only 2 containers protected their eggs from that fall.

IMG_0394

Once the students were done testing their containers, they went back into the classroom to discuss what worked and what didn’t work and shared theories as to why. It was definitely a successful lesson!

Here is a free printable your child or students can use to plan out their designs.

Screen Shot 2013-03-28 at 1.35.53 PM

Find more STEM activities in our ebook! Learn more about it here , or b uy it now here !

Lemon Lime Adventures

Creating The Perfect Egg Drop Project

Its time for another Hands On Play Party ! This week is a special week here at Lemon Lime Adventures because we are taking part in Tinkerlab’s exciting Creative Challenge Project . We love everything Tinkerlab does, so when Rachelle put out a call for participants to create with eggs, I got excited. If you are a regular here, you know how much we love science around here. You might not be surprised to find out that we turned this challenge into a Creative and Scientific Egg Drop Project. Today I will share the creative side of the project, but be sure to check back for Saturday Science where I share our results . You won’t want to miss what happens.

Project Egg Drop

If you have not ever heard of Tinkerlab , you are missing out! Seriously, Rachelle is incredibly creative and her way of presenting children with art is thought-provoking and investigative in nature. The Creative Challenges are designed to encourage children to think independently through self-directed projects that encourage problem solving and creative thinking.

I have always wanted to do an egg drop project with the boys, but all of our other projects seem to get in the way. This project was just the motivation we needed.

Proposing the Egg Drop Project

It was actually quite simple. Over breakfast one morning I mentioned to the boys (ages 6 and 8) that there was a project about eggs. We could do absolutely anything we wanted.

Me: What would you guys think of creating something for your eggs so they don’t break when you drop them? Are you in? Boys (in unison): Oh, we’re IN!

I believe in using a child’s interest to lead their investigations, play and learning, so I tossed the project in their hands. For journaling that day I had both boys list any item they think they would need for their contraption and I would collect the materials for them. They could use any item they could think of. They could even look through our craft area and our recycled materials.

I have never seen the boys so excited to write in their journals.

Setting Up for the Egg Drop Project

Invitation for Egg Drop Project

Materials Needed:

* Recycled Materials (We used berry containers, yogurt cups, Cardboard Tubes, and Cardboard Boxes) * Grocery Bags * Scrap Paper * Bubble Wrap * Scissors * Tape ( We used Decorative Washi Tape ) * Yarn * Eggs (I was tempted to hard boil them for less mess, but we went raw for the full effect)

After the boys listed all of their requests, I gathered the items up and arranged them in an inviting way on the table. All of the materials were visible and organized for the boys to use.

Creating Egg Drop Contraptions

Egg Drop Contraption

Legoman (age 8) is my little engineer . He loves to build and create and is always tinkering away at things. I have to say, when he started grabbing cups, and tubes, and boxes, I had no idea what he was thinking in his head.

One thing I try to remember when children are creating, is to give them space. I try to observe and document what they are doing, only interrupting to ask questions. In doing this, I put the problem solving on them, enable them to think through their processes and take ownership over their work.

As Legoman built, I wanted to tell him his creation was all wrong. I wanted to say “We aren’t building robots (which he often does).” Instead, I watched.

Can you tell me more about your parts? Explain what this piece is for… Why did you choose… What is the purpose of …

As you can see, Legoman added stablizers on all sides of the egg, and created a cushion of yarn around the egg in its box. His hope was that no matter which side the contraption lands on… it would be safe.

As a finishing touch he added a grocery bag as a parachute to “soften the fall” as he said. Even this took some trial and error as he had to get the balance just right on the parachute.

Taping Egg Drop Project

Now, here is why I love open ended projects so much! Bones (age 6) is a VERY different little boy. He is incredibly creative and artsy. He does not create for function, he creates for process and aesthetics.

So, of course the first material he went for was the pretty Washi tape. With a tad bit of help from mom to hold the egg, he wrapped his egg in more tape and tubing.

It looks like a work of art, doesn’t it?

Egg Drop Container

He wasn’t done there…

He used a small raspberry container to hold his egg.

But first, he needed to make a next in the container. He used as much yarn as he could, created the nest, placed the egg inside and was ready to test out his invention.

What do you think happened? Do you think the eggs survived their falls from the front porch, the neighbors first story staircase, or the second story window?  You will have to follow along for Saturday Science to see the results and the s Scientific inquiry in our Egg Drop Project !

If you want a great list to get you started, download the list below to get your free printable list of 52 STEAM challenges for your kids . I am not sure it gets much easier than that! When you get the list, you will also be added to get the latest updates about our awesome new STEAM Kids Book that is full of amazing STEAM activities for kids.

52 Engineering Projects for Kids

Click Here to Download

Do you want to join Tinkerlab’s Creative Egg Challenge ?

Grab some eggs, set up an invitation to create, and document what happens. While projects should be child-led, grown-ups are welcome to join in the fun if the mood strikes! You can share your pictures using #creativekidschallenge. If you are a blogger, you can link up your post between April 1st-30th. While you are at it, don’t forget to link up here at the Hands on Play Party as well!

Now it’s time for the Hands On Play party!

My favorite hands-on creative egg project from last week, its your turn to show us your hands-on play ideas., sight words egg hunt, {p is for preschooler}, exploring mirror reflections easter eggs, lights & shiny objects, {little bins for little hands}, sensory play with paper pulp, {stir the wonder}.

What is your Favorite Hands-on Activity? Be sure to link up below or comment on  Facebook ,  Twitter ,  Google+ ,  Pinterest ,  Instagram .  Don’t miss a thing,  subscribe by email  . (I only send one email a week)

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Discover how to get siblings to get along even when all they do is annoy each other with the Sibling “Get Along” Poster Pack!

24 thoughts on “Creating The Perfect Egg Drop Project”

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Your kids get to learn in the most fun ways! I can’t wait to see how to egg drop project turned out!

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You have me wanting to do an egg drop experiment now! I love the egg all wrapped up in tubing and wash tape. That’s totally how I would make my egg 🙂

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Love your approach. I am curious to see the results. In our case all eggs were good for human height vertical drop, but broke on horizontal flight from higher ground. Both Legoman and Bones did awesome!

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Dayna! I’m so glad that you jumped in on this challenge. This post is beyond inspiring and I bet you’ll encourage a lot of people to try this with their kids. I know that my kids will be in to this and can’t wait to try it with them.

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you are too kind: I am so happy to be part of this Challenge . My boys can’t stop coming up with egg ideas .

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Wow… You’re raising some little engineers 🙂 Great project you have here!

That is so sweet! I am so glad you loved it!

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Wow, love this. My son would think that this is the best thing ever! We’ll have to try it out

Fantastic! Can’t wait to hear how it goes!

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the egg drop has always been my favorite project in grade school. your photos are amazing! thank you for sharing 🙂

Thank you! We really loved it!

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I am working on a science project hoping to make an a so please give opinions on the egg drop project

What do you need help with?

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My opinion about the egg drop project is very confusing and i like the part were inertia takes place.

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How To Keep An Egg From Breaking Science Project

Table of Contents:

How to Make an Egg Survive a 20-Foot Drop . If you’re in an egg drop competition, you should use a two-prong strategy to protect the egg and keep it from breaking.

  • Things You’ll Need

Cushioning the Impact

If you’ve entered an egg-drop contest, there are basically two strategies you can use to help that egg survive a fall. The first is to cushion the impact, and the second is to reduce the speed of the fall. If you get to choose your own egg, you can soften it with vinegar to help it absorb the impact. That will help, but by itself, it won’t prevent the egg from breaking. Cushioning the Impact Enclosing the egg in something that can absorb the force of impact can protect the egg from a fall. You’ll need something that is highly compressible for this. Water won’t do the trick, nor will soft solids like peanut butter or sugar, or any incompressible liquid or powder. A gas is compressible, though, and air is a gas, so anything that contains a lot of air should work. Possibilities include balloons, popcorn, packing peanuts, wads of paper or cereal puffs. Encase the egg in any of these inside a paper or plastic bag, a sock or a stocking. If you have any bubble wrap around the house, wrapping the egg in several layers of bubble wrap should also provide a good cushion.

Video advice: Top 10 1ST PLACE Egg Drop Designs! Science Experiment Challenge!

These are the top 10 1st Place egg drop challenge designs from yesterday. Using physics and science we created the best and most insane egg drop designs! We had pringles cans egg drop a balloon egg drop a 3d printed egg drop and more egg drop designs! Watch these 10 awesome designs and guess which ones will protect the egg!

How To Keep An Egg From Breaking Science Project

How to Drop an Egg Without It Breaking

The egg drop is a classic science experiment, but it can still be pretty intimidating if you’ve never successfully completed it. To drop an egg without breaking it, you need to find a way to minimize the force of the impact and its effects…

Weigh lower the foot of your container. You can put the egg towards the top of a cushioned container rather of placing it within the center as lengthy as you’ve huge enough weight to manage the direction the container falls in. The simplest way to get this done is by using a stone and styrofoam cups.

If you do not have bubble wrap but do have other packing materials, like packing peanuts, inflated plastic packing packets, packing paper, cotton balls, or crumpled newspaper, you can use these materials to cushion the egg, as well. Spread a thick layer of your chosen packing material inside a box that is at least four to eight times larger than the egg. You should use enough material to fill the box halfway. Place the egg in the center of this cushion, then gently cover it with enough packing material to fill the rest of the box. Close the box and seal it with tape before the drop.

Egg Drop Challenge – Take the Egg Drop challenge at school or home. Low mess and great learning with a simple egg drop project all ages can enjoy together.

We have two versions of this egg drop challenge, one for older kids and one for younger kids. Do you need real eggs? Usually, I would say yes, but given the circumstances, how about candy-filled plastic eggs? If you don’t want to waste food for any reason, don’t! Find a workaround instead.

  • EGG DROP FOR OLDER KIDS
  • EGG DROP FOR YOUNGER KIDS
  • IDEAS THAT FAILED!
  • EGG DROP IDEAS THAT WORKED!

Successful Egg Drop Project Design with Straws

Successful egg drop challenge project design with straws, with design tips and tricks. Fun outdoor physics science STEM challenge for kids of all ages.

Before we begin the look process, we did some online search to obtain some design ideas, only then do we attempted the pyramid design first. Obviously, it unsuccessful. The actual learning occurs when kids have to determine what’s wrong and the way to improve. Continue reading to understand the learning leading towards the winning design.

More process and design tricks we learned through this project

Egg drop challenge science project is always fun for kids. You design a structure to hold the egg and to protect the egg from breaking when dropped from certain height. The project can be designed for different age groups with various difficulty levels. For this one, we limit the design materials on straws, tapes and hot glue only. The goal of the science project is for kids to learn physics science, design process, engineering while having fun. If you’d like to try with your kids or students, we have a free design process worksheet to help the design thinking.

The egg drop experiment seeks to answer the question how can I keep an egg from breaking? This is an old experiment done by many kids over many years, and it never seems to lose.

Scavenged products – Your children will require a couple of other activities, however, you allow them scour the home at the time from the experiment. Gracie and Allie used cotton balls, plastic bags, toilet tissue tubes, balloons, and a few coffee filters. Personally, i might have used a kitchen area towel, but she did not request my advice.

Video advice: 1st place Egg Drop project ideas- using SCIENCE

5 designs guaranteed to win 1st place or your money back. I hope you enjoy the video and learn something new like I did when I made it. Feel free to share with any one who likes to learn science or is in a High School Physics class!

How To Keep An Egg From Breaking Science Project

Egg Drop Instructions

Newton’s First Law of Motion states that an object at rest tends to stay at rest, and an object in motion tends to stay in motion – unless an outside force acts on it. This is called inertia. In this case, the egg falls because of gravity, and it keeps falling until something (the ground) stops it. The egg is moving really fast when it hits the ground, so the force is big. The large force breaks the egg unless there is something in the way to provide cushion and absorb the force.

Use de-shelled chicken eggs as models for investigating diffusion and osmosis across plasma membranes.

The de-shelled eggs function as good types of human cells. Following the eggshell is taken away, a skinny membrane (really, two membranes held tightly together) remains. This membrane, like individuals in human cells, is selectively permeable, allowing certain substances to feed while blocking others.

In general, the most dramatic changes to the mass, color, and shape of the eggs will occur within the first 24 hours of the experiment. Eggs submerged in corn syrup will have lost considerable mass and have the appearance of flabby sacks. Eggs soaked in distilled water will gain mass and appear dramatically swollen. Eggs in dilute salt solutions will gain mass, and even those in very concentrated solutions might gain mass. Eggs buried in salt or other dry media should lose mass.

Protect Your ‘Eggstronaut’: Build an Egg-Drop Lander

Protect your ‘eggstronaut’ during their landing in this fun egg-drop STEM activity.

Drop the lander again in the same height. Continue doing this process, looking for damage every time, before the egg breaks or even the lander falls apart and can’t be re-used. Keep an eye on the entire quantity of drops it survives and write the dpi lower.

For Further Exploration

You might have found this project surprisingly difficult! Even if the egg survives the first few drops, you might start to see wear and tear on your lander. Taped or glued joints could start to come apart, materials like straws or popsicle sticks might start to bend or snap, and cushioning materials like cotton balls might become compacted, decreasing their effectiveness over time. Many successful traditional egg drop devices might intentionally rely on this behavior. If you only need to drop your device once, you can design it so that some of the materials break, absorbing energy and protecting the egg. That approach doesn’t work if you want to re-use the device dozens of times!

Science Experiment: Acids – The Indianapolis Public Library provides materials, programs and services in support of the lifelong learning, recreational, and economic interests of all Marion County residents.

Vinegar is an acid. Eggshells are made of calcium carbonate. If you soak an egg in vinegar the eggshell will absorb the acid and break down, or dissolve. The calcium carbonate will become carbon dioxide gas, which will go into the air. What is left is the soft tissue that lined the inside of the eggshell. It will bounce!

  • Websites, Activities & Printables:

The Incredible Egg

Engineering activities give kids a chance to develop problem solving and observations skills, to work with interesting and engaging tools and materials, and to learn how to work as a member of a team. In this activity, your students will get to do all of that as they are challenged to protect an egg from breaking after it is dropped from a set height. This activity is part of the Incredible Egg series of activities, which are designed to be done during the Spring.

Arrange the recycled materials in a manner that prevents a totally free-for-all. You may only released a number of that which you assume would be the most widely used products so the first couple of teams don’t bring them all, then replenish individuals materials because they go out. Place any tools (scissors, etc. ) around the tables for kids to make use of. Construct the newspaper or drop cloth in your “drop zone. ”

Can you save this egg from getting scrambled?

Can you save this egg from getting scrambled? Engineering activities give kids a chance to develop problem solving and observations skills, to work with interesting and engaging tools and materials, and to learn how to work as a member of a team. In this activity, your students will get to do all of that as they are challenged to protect an egg from breaking after it is dropped from a set height. This activity is part of the Incredible Egg series of activities, which are designed to be done during the Spring.

Science on the Brain – In the video, we created a cushioning system made of paper towels. We found that it takes a cushion of about 30 paper towels — a layer approximately two inches thick — to protect the egg if you drop it from 24 inches above the pad.

If the egg is falling from 2 feet, the distance is 2 feet, so the time is . 354 seconds. That means that the egg has a velocity of 11. 3 feet per second when it hits the counter. If the egg falls from 3 feet, the velocity is 13. 9 feet per second, or 23% faster. If you drop it from 8 feet, the speed is 22. 6 feet per second. It will take a lot more padding to protect an egg falling that fast.

Awesome Egg Experiments for Kids – 10 fun and easy egg experiments for kids. Includes making an unbreakable egg, making a baked alaska, an egg shell bridge and more!

Easter is just around the corner, so I’ve put together a collection of egg experiments perfect for this time of year. Eggs are great for experiments as they are inexpensive, easily available and very versatile. We try not to waste food at Science Sparks, but for most of these ideas you can still eat the actual egg. Do be careful if you have a child with allergies though.

  • Egg Drop Experiment
  • Unbreakable Egg Experiment
  • Egg Experiments with Vinegar
  • How to shrink an egg
  • How strong is an egg shell?
  • Egg in a Bottle
  • Meringue Experiments
  • Make an Egg Float
  • Eggs as Teeth
  • Egg Vehicles

DIY Physics Lesson: Try to Drop an Egg Without Cracking It – There is nothing like adding an element of danger to get kids excited about physics. The goal is simple: an egg surviving a drop without cracking. The challenge is in developing a device that will help the egg survive better than when Humpty Dumpty took his historic fall off the wall. It’s time to… Read more.

Step three: Build! We ended up with three designs: 1. a cylinder of foam tightly around the egg with a small bubble wrap parachute; 2. a small box filled with foam around the egg and a plastic bag parachute; and 3. a repurposed thin box filled with marshmallows and Peeps surrounding the egg. The third design had no mechanism to slow acceleration and was considering the most risky.

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  1. Best Egg Drop Project Ideas

    egg drop project tissue box

  2. Design Egg Drop Challenge Ideas Successful Egg Drop Project Design With

    egg drop project tissue box

  3. 10 Great Egg Drop Ideas For Kids 2023

    egg drop project tissue box

  4. 10 Trendy Egg Drop Project Ideas That Work 2024

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  5. 38 Egg drop ideas

    egg drop project tissue box

  6. 7 Egg Drop Container Contest

    egg drop project tissue box

VIDEO

  1. Egg Drop Project #physicsfun #math

  2. Egg Drop Science Project

  3. DIY-Plastic Egg Tray Craft Ideas/ PLASTIC EGG CARTON FLOWER/Home Decor Ideas/CRAFT IDEAS/Mehraf's

COMMENTS

  1. Successful Egg Drop Ideas

    Egg drop projects teach students to use logic and teamwork to protect their eggs from a fall. There are a variety of ways to conduct an egg drop. Begin by explaining the process and handing out eggs to the students. Set the parameters of your egg drop and a deadline when your students must be ready to drop their eggs or go bust. Container Designs

  2. Egg Drop Experiment

    The smallest entry in the egg drop was a little box cushioned with cotton batting, a single egg carton styrofoam piece, all topped with rubber bands, the lid, and secured shut with a few rubber bands. Even though it was so small, it worked beautifully!

  3. How to Build an Egg Drop Project: 10 Steps (with Pictures)

    1 Collect all of the materials listed below that you will need for the project. 2 Choose a location to drop your egg. It is recommended to use a stairwell where you can drop the egg chamber from at least the height of 12 feet (3.7 m). 3

  4. 26 Best Egg Drop Challenge Ideas

    1. Disaster egg drop Teach Engineering/disaster egg drop via teachengineering.org Have students imagine that they are trying to deliver eggs to people who have been in a disaster. They must use contents from care packages to pack and try to deliver their eggs.

  5. Egg Drop Project Ideas That Really Work

    Kids ranging from elementary school through high school age are being assigned a science ( STEM) project, where they will have to use their ingenuity to design a package out of everyday items...

  6. Awesome Egg Drop Ideas

    TIP: Tape and rubber bands are great to have on hand for securing constructions. 1. Parachute Design. Attach a parachute made from a plastic bag or thin fabric to slow down the descent of the egg. Experiment with different parachute sizes and shapes. Materials: Plastic bags, fabric scraps, tissue paper. 2.

  7. The Ultimate Egg Drop Engineering Project

    Idea 1: How to prevent an egg from breaking when dropped with straws In this version, I challenged the kids to create a cage for their egg out of straws. It was a pretty good design! Even though we only dropped it from the second story, I bet the design would have held up from even higher up. Idea 2: How to prevent an egg from breaking when dropped

  8. Protect Your 'Eggstronaut': Build an Egg-Drop Lander

    The egg-drop project is a classic and time-honored tradition in many science classes. The goal is usually to build a device that can protect an egg when dropped from a high location. This activity puts a twist on the classic project, motivated by real-world advances in space exploration.

  9. Successful Egg Drop Contraptions for a Science Project

    A simple padded box may likely be the most common successful egg drop contraption. The box you use should crush on impact, so use a material like cardboard instead of plastic or metal. You can line a box with any cushion or soft material, such as foam, sponges, bubble paper, cotton or marshmallows. Egg crate foam works particularly well ...

  10. Egg Drop Project

    Home / STEM Education / STEM Projects / Egg Drop Project By Colleen Rosenthal Updated 11/06/2023 Can You Drop an Egg without Breaking It? The egg drop challenge is a classic but it never ceases to amaze the kids, and I am always amazed with their ingenuity!

  11. STEM for Kids: Egg Drop Project

    Egg Drop Project. Kids were instructed to bring in materials from home for their egg contraptions. This year we changed the rules up a bit and eliminated a few materials the kids usually use in their egg contraptions- no boxes and no battery powered items. After collecting materials over a few days, students were able to work independently, in ...

  12. Egg Drop Project

    Step 1: Place a raw egg in the middle of a sheet of bubble wrap. Roll the bubble wrap around the egg several times. Seal the bubble wrap with some adhesive tape to ensure that the egg is securely wrapped. Step 2: Fill the plastic jar halfway with packing peanuts and place the egg in the middle.

  13. Egg Drop Challenge: An engineering based science project

    Think about how to buffer the impact. Create a reusable project. Use hot glue or duct tape. 1. Buffer the egg's impact. A successful egg drop project means your egg has no cracks on it whatsoever when you take it out. Eggs are fragile. Drop it on its side or its top/bottom with no protection and it will break.

  14. Egg Drop Challenge and Free Planning Printable

    Procedure Come up with an idea of some type of container you can make to protect an egg from a high fall. Build your container and place the egg inside. Drop the egg from someplace high. (Be sure it's safe and an adult is with you.) After you drop it look and see if your egg cracked or remained intact.

  15. Egg Drop Project

    Change the way it drops with this awesome egg drop experiment! Ages: 9 - 16. 30 minutes - 1 hour. Messy. An egg drop experiment is the perfect way to tap into your creativity and solve problems through a cool (and messy) project! Think outside the box and engineer awesome solutions to keep your egg safe and sound.

  16. Creating The Perfect Egg Drop Project

    * Scrap Paper * Bubble Wrap * Scissors * Tape ( We used Decorative Washi Tape) * Yarn * Eggs (I was tempted to hard boil them for less mess, but we went raw for the full effect) After the boys listed all of their requests, I gathered the items up and arranged them in an inviting way on the table.

  17. Crack the Norm! Six Egg-citing Egg Drop Experiment Ideas

    Instructions: 1. Cut a leg off of the nylons and insert the egg in the middle. 2. Wrap a rubber band at either side of the egg to keep it from sliding in the hose. 3. Place the egg in the center of the box and stretch the hose on either side tightly to the edge of the box, securing with a staple and tape.

  18. How To Make Egg Drop Project With Just Paper And Tape!

    303 Share 51K views 3 years ago This was for an honors physics class. The limitations were to be able to protect an egg from falling 3m or 9'9" ...more ...more EGG DROP PROJECT DESIGN...

  19. Egg Drop

    Plastic bags Boxes Used material Plastic containers The aim: Your goal is simple, design and build a system that will protect an egg from a 1 metre (3.3 feet) drop. Eggs that smash or crack fail the test while eggs that survive without a scratch pass! Getting started:

  20. Egg Drop Project Teaches Engineering Design

    Egg Drop Project Teaches Engineering Design | Lesson Plan Teaching Engineering Design with an Egg Drop Summary Grade Range 6th-8th Group Size 2-3 students Active Time 3-4 hours Total Time 3-4 hours Area of Science Mechanical Engineering Space Exploration Key Concepts force, energy, engineering design Credits Ben Finio, PhD, Science Buddies Overview

  21. How To Keep An Egg From Breaking Science Project

    Step three: Build! We ended up with three designs: 1. a cylinder of foam tightly around the egg with a small bubble wrap parachute; 2. a small box filled with foam around the egg and a plastic bag parachute; and 3. a repurposed thin box filled with marshmallows and Peeps surrounding the egg.