Origami Guide

Origami Instructions – Learn How To Make Origami

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

Share This:

Stuck at home and need something entertaining and educational for kids?

Here are 10 easy origami projects that kids (or adults) can enjoy making in small groups or by themselves..

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

Origami is the perfect activity to do with kids at home during self isolation or quarantine. All you need is some paper and maybe some decorations to make it extra fun.

Whether you’re at home with the kids or practicing social distancing or self-isolation, origami will help to pass the time, give you something entertaining as well as a little challenging to complete.

So which origami models should you fold? Here at Origami.guide, we have compiled this top ten list of origami to fold while in quarantine.

10 Origami Models to Fold in Quarantine

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

1. Fortune Teller

The origami fortune teller, sometimes called a cootie catcher. This easy origami model can be used in a fortune telling game.

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

The origami crane is probably the most well-known origami model in existence. The story of a thousand cranes is popular in Japan and around the world.

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

3. Lotus Flower

A unique and beautiful origami flower , the lotus or water lily. This origami flower can be folded with a napkin, making it a great party trick.

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

4. Masu Box

Endlessly useful, easy to fold and fun to make too. The origami Masu box is one origami model that is easy to commit to memory.

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

5. Jumping Frog

A lot of you will remember folding these origami frogs and racing them with your friends at school.

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

6. Finger Puppets

Origami finger puppets are fun and easy to make, after you have made them, you can make a little play with the puppets!

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

The majestic swan, one of the simplest and oldest origami models.

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

Remember making these from newspaper? You must have grown up in the nineties!

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

9. Water Balloon

These satisfying origami water balloons can actually be used as water balloons! Now they are more popular as decorations to hang on a string or over lights.

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

Origami hearts get more popular around February but are quick and easy to make and use for cards or to leave in your crush’s bag!

Looking for more challenging models?

Head over to PaperKawaii.com and check out some more intermediate origami tutorials in mostly video tutorial format.

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

Popular Origami:

How To Make An Origami Lily Flower

Level: Easy

Copyright: Traditional

How To Make An Easy Origami Bird

Copyright: Unknown

How To Make An Origami Box Divider

Level: Easy-Intermediate

Copyright: Paolo Bascetta

Origami Categories:

In Quarantine? Here are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

Sign Up For Our Free Origami Newsletter

Join our free mailing list to get an email when brand new origami tutorials have just been added. You can also expect some freebies such as printable origami paper and news updates too!

You will never get any spam from us.

Success! Check your inbox or spam folder now to confirm your subscription.

Origami Resource Center

School Projects in Paper Arts

Are you an educator and want to incorporate School Projects with origami and paper arts into your program? Perhaps you are a parent and want to introduce your child to the joy of paper arts. Either way, this is the place for you. I have volunteered in elementary schools for many years and have discovered what works and what doesn’t. Below is a list of origami and paper projects which I teach to first graders through 3rd graders.

I usually start a paper arts program in October. This gives the students time to familiarize themselves with their new teacher and the rules of the room. By October, they are ready for some extra fun – with me!

October projects

geometry origami project

1 Paper Airplane 2 Pop-Up Card 3 Magic Wand 4 Halloween Bat   ( details here )

I always start my first origami project with a paper airplane. Kids love this action model and it gives them so much joy to fold and fly their airplanes. This model is sure to make them see me as their friend – as someone who can help them – as someone to listen to – as someone to look forward to ever week – and as someone who can guide them in an adventure in paper folding.

Halloween crafts play a major role in the latter half of the month.

November projects

geometry origami project

1 Toothpick Amer Flag 2 Kirigami Star 3 Pencil Toppers 4 Origami Turkey   ( details here )

November proves to be an interesting month for volunteer work. On one hand, I have a lot of options because November has Veteran’s Day and Thanksgiving. But I am also limited since there is no school on both holidays. As well, teachers often have a very busy November schedule since they may host in-class Thanksgiving dinners or plays. Students tend to be quite unruly in November, possibly because of the high holiday content (Halloween, Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and Christmas).

December projects

geometry origami project

1 Tree Pop Up Card 2 Candy Cane 3 Christmas Tree 4 Kirigami Star of David   ( details here )

Year after year, December remains the most exciting month of the entire year. The Christmas buzz starts right away and continues until winter break. In between, you have Hanukkah and Kwanzaa. There are many, many Christmas themed origami projects and only a handful of Jewish origami/kirigami crafts. Pick and choose your school projects based on how much time you have and the demographics of the students.

January projects

geometry origami project

1 Kirigami Snowflake 2 Kirigami Decoration 3 Paper Chain of Dolls 4 Chinese Paper Lantern   ( details here )

January is often a quiet month. Children have spent their energies over the winter break and the cool weather dampens their spirit. I fill January with paper-cutting projects which seem easier than paper-folding projects. I choose easy-to-accomplish school projects that will warm their hearts and boost their self esteem.

January, a winter month, is a good time to cut paper snowflakes. In observance of Martin Luther King: try cutting a chain of dolls all holding hands. And don’t forget Chinese New Year: a perfect time to teach the classic Chinese Paper Lantern.

February projects

geometry origami project

1 Valentine Pop-Up Card 2 Origami Heart 3 Weaved Heart Basket 4 Paper Chain Hearts

  ( details here )

Friendship and love surpasses all borders and the heart is commonly used to express these feelings. In honor of Valentines Day, February is devoted to hearts. We have folded hearts, weaved hearts, cut out hearts, and heart cards.

Even though Valentines Day is officially over on the 14th, I teach Valentine themed arts and crafts all month long. Hey – why not? We can all do with a little extra ♥ .

March Projects

geometry origami project

1. Pot of Gold Pop-Up 2. 3D Stand Up Clover 3. Box of Gold 4. Cootie Catcher

Interestingly, most origami projects which involve clovers, shamrocks, or leprechauns are rather complex. Nevertheless, there are a few interesting paper crafts suited for St Patrick’s Day: a pop-up card, a stand-up shamrock, and an easy origami box. If you decorate the origami boxes with green clovers, it can be used to hold St Patrick’s Day chocolate coins. alternatively, use pastel colors and make it into an Easter-themed box.

The last week of March is used to make an April Fools origami project: the classic cootie catcher. Do you know why it is called a cootie catcher? Find out here .

April School Projects

geometry origami project

1 Origami Rabbit 2 Origami Rabbit Head 3 Tie-Dye Napkins 4 Origami Flower

April is filled with Easter fun. I teach the students how to make an origami bunny rabbit and an origami rabbit head. The bunny rabbit is quite popular and parents complain to me that their house is quickly filled with little bunnies everywhere.

If you decorate eggs, save that left over dye! Students can make fabulous tie dye napkins.

April showers bring May flowers. I also introduce a few origami flowers. These take us into May where we can present our paper flowers to our Mothers.

May School Projects

geometry origami project

1 Simple Flower 2 Mother and Child Swan 3 Origami Butterfly 4 Whirligig & Kite

May paper projects is a celebration of spring and early summer: flowers, butterflies; fun things such as whirligigs and kites; and a special Mother-and-Child Swan. Fun, fun, fun! Check it out!

June School Projects

geometry origami project

1. Origami Tie 2. Origami shirt 3. Origami Sunglasses

June is dedicated to Fathers. What better way to celebrate Father’s Day than to give Daddy gifts from the heart, made by the hand! On the menu for this last month of the school year is an origami tie and an origami sunglasses to enhance Daddy’s wardrobe. Let’s give Dad a new paper car which he can drive to get to his new paper boat! While fishing, why not let him catch a few weaved paper fish. It’s a project devoted to dads.

  Finally, the school year is nearing an end. If you have followed these origami and paper arts project, you must have noticed that your children and students are becoming more and more proficient in their work. Not surprising: origami has been known to have many educational and health benefits.

Although these projects have been designed for grades 1 and 2 children, you can easily expand the curriculum to include older children. There are many books which use origami to teach geometry and other mathematical concepts. See them here .

Books with Easy Origami

Easy Origami Books

More Origami Diagrams and Instructions…

Origami Animals

These free origami instructions are made available to you by the paper folding community at large. If you have a diagram you would like to share, or if your diagram is listed here and you wish to have it removed, please Contact Us . Diagrams are intended for personal use. Copyright of the models lie with the origami creators and designers. Please contact the designer and/or creator directly for non-private usage of a model and/or artwork.

Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Author colin-morton

pentagon project step

Cb gd slide, austria slide, paper slide, gd fd slide, pentagon project angles, migumi biddle slide, ab da slide.

Embed Size (px) 344 x 292 429 x 357 514 x 422 599 x 487

Text of Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Page 1: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs

Robert Geretschläger

Graz, Austria

Page 2: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

6 Problems from 1 Fold

1. Prove that C‘D‘ is a tangent of the circle with center C. passing through B and D.

2. Prove that the perimeter of triangle GAC‘ is equal to half the perimeter of ABCD.

3. Prove the identity AG = C‘B + GD‘

4. Prove that the sum of the perimeters of triangles C‘BE and GD‘F is equal to the perimeter of triangle GAC‘.

5. Prove that the perimeter of triangle GD‘F is equal to the length of line segment AC‘.

6. Prove that the inradius of GAC‘ is equal to the length of line segment GD‘.

1. More Mathematical Morsels; Ross Honsberger

2. VIII Nordic Mathematical Contest 1994

4. 37th Slovenian Mathematical Olympiad 1993

6. classic Sangaku problem

Page 3: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Prove that C‘D‘ is a tangent

of the circle with center C.

passing through

Page 4: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Prove that the perimeter of triangle GAC‘ is equal to half

the perimeter of ABCD.

AC‘ + C‘G + GA

= AC‘ + C‘P + GP + GA

= AC‘ + C‘B + GD + GA

Page 5: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Prove the identity AG =

= AB + C‘D‘

= AC‘ + C‘B + C‘G + GD‘

AG = C‘B + GD‘

Page 6: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Prove that the sum of the perimeters of triangles C‘BE

and GD‘F is equal to the perimeter of triangle GAC‘.

GAC‘ ~ C’BE ~ GD’F

AG = C’B + GD’ AC’ = BE + D’F C’G = EC’ + FG

AG + AC’ + C’G = (C’B + BE + EC’) + (GD’ + D’F + FG)

Page 7: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Prove that the perimeter of triangle GD‘F is equal to the length of line segment AC‘.

= D‘G + GF + FD

= D‘G + GD + FD‘

Page 8: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Prove that the inradius of GAC‘ is equal to the length of line

segment GD‘.

CDC‘I = C‘III = x, GII = GIII = y, AI = AII = r

2C‘D‘ = AC‘ + AG + GC‘

= (r + x) + (r + y) + (x + y)

= 2(x + y + r)

2(x + y + GD‘) = 2(x + y + r)

Page 9: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

The Pentagon Project

The Golden Ratio

a : 1 = 1 : (a-1)

a² - a – 1 = 0

Page 10: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Angles in a regular pentagon

Page 11: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

The Golden Triangle

d : 1 = 1 : (d-1)

Page 12: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Placing the

Pentagon on the

Page 13: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

The Pentagon ProjectStep 2

Page 15: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

The Pentagon ProjectStep 3

Page 16: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

The Pentagon ProjectStep 4

Page 17: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

The Pentagon ProjectStep 5

Page 18: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

The Pentagon ProjectStep 6

Page 19: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

The Pentagon ProjectStep 7

Page 20: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

The Pentagon ProjectStep 8

Page 21: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Additional challenges for advanced pentagonists:

+++ Can a regular pentagon with sides a longer than 1/ be placed in the interior of a unit square?

+++ Determine a folding sequence for a larger regular pentagon.

+++ Determine the largest possible value of a. Prove that your value is the largest possible.

Page 22: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Part 1Folding method by Shuzo Fujimoto; from „The New Origami“ by Steve and Migumi Biddle

Page 23: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Part 2Folding method by Shuzo Fujimoto; from „The New Origami“ by Steve and Migumi Biddle

Page 24: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Challenge Question:

Decide whether the pentagram folded by this method is regular or not and prove your assertion.

The pentagram is not regular!

Have a closer look at step 6!

Page 25: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Axioms of Construction

Straight-edge and Compass: P1

P3point on object

point at intersection

P point at random

Page 27: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Paper folding:

Page 28: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Axioms of Constructionl P

Page 30: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Folding Roots

Linear equation ax = b

Solution: x = ab

slope of the crease is ab

Page 32: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Quadratic Equation x²+px+q = 0

x² - 2usx + 2uvs – 2uw = 0

u²s² - 2uvs + 2uw = 0

Parabola:x² = 2uy

Tangent:y = s(x - v) + w

u = 2, v = -p, w = q

Parabola: x² = 4y

(Focus F(0,1), directrix y = -1)

Page 33: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

111P (x ,y )

222P (x ,y )

y t: y = cx + d

p1: yy1 = ax + ax1

p2: xx2 = by + by2

Page 34: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

1p :(y-n)²=2a(x-m)2

t: y = cx + d

p1: (y-n)(y1–n) = a(x-m) + a(x1–m)

p2: xx2 = by + by2 02223 ba

x³ + px² + qx + r = 0

p = -2m, q = 2n,

r = a, b = 1

222221 :;, rpqrp xlF

Page 37: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

angle trisection:

cos 34cos³ - 3cos

Page 38: Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

Thanks for listening!

[email protected]

http://geretschlaeger.brgkepler.at

Fairs & Events 2020

Fairs & Events 2020

Virtual Fairs Presentation

Virtual Fairs Presentation

Sustainability Award 2008 - BMBWF6d3b5ed0-fd4e-431a... · CHANGE MANAGEMENT/ FüHRUNGSKRÄFTE, TU Graz EESD 2008, TU Graz FUSSABDRUCKSRECHNER, TU Graz GESUNDHEITSFÖRDERUNG, TU Graz

Sustainability Award 2008 - BMBWF6d3b5ed0-fd4e-431a... · CHANGE MANAGEMENT/ FüHRUNGSKRÄFTE, TU Graz EESD 2008, TU Graz FUSSABDRUCKSRECHNER, TU Graz GESUNDHEITSFÖRDERUNG, TU Graz

Origami und Geometrie – Papier kann mehr als man denkt Robert Geretschläger BRG Kepler, Graz Zürich, 12.9.2012

Origami und Geometrie – Papier kann mehr als man denkt Robert Geretschläger BRG Kepler, Graz Zürich, 12.9.2012

EXHIBITIONS AND FAIRS

EXHIBITIONS AND FAIRS

2013 ART & CRAFT FAIRS - Travel Wisconsin art fairs directory.pdf · 1 General Information The Wisconsin Arts & Craft Fairs Directory is a comprehensive listing of art and craft fairs

2013 ART & CRAFT FAIRS - Travel Wisconsin art fairs directory.pdf · 1 General Information The Wisconsin Arts & Craft Fairs Directory is a comprehensive listing of art and craft fairs

Project Fairs: Organizing Fairs to Find Project Partners

Project Fairs: Organizing Fairs to Find Project Partners

Trade Fairs Brno

Trade Fairs Brno

Curriculum für das Bachelorstudium - Graz University of ......Graz) und der Technischen Universität Graz (TU Graz) im Rahmen von „NAWI Graz“ eingerichtet. Rechtsgrundlagen für

Curriculum für das Bachelorstudium - Graz University of ......Graz) und der Technischen Universität Graz (TU Graz) im Rahmen von „NAWI Graz“ eingerichtet. Rechtsgrundlagen für

Stadt Graz | Graz-Rathaus | 8010 DI Bernhard Inninger, A14 Stadtplanungsamt Neugestaltung Andreas-Hofer-Platz Mehr Zeit für Graz 11. April 2013 Stadt Graz

Stadt Graz | Graz-Rathaus | 8010 DI Bernhard Inninger, A14 Stadtplanungsamt Neugestaltung Andreas-Hofer-Platz Mehr Zeit für Graz 11. April 2013 Stadt Graz

Science Fairs

Science Fairs

Primarily Fairs

Primarily Fairs

Msr science fairs

Msr science fairs

Fairs and festivals

Fairs and festivals

Knowledge Fairs Guide

Knowledge Fairs Guide

Trade Fairs Specialist

Trade Fairs Specialist

Flughafen Graz - Jahresbericht 2008 · 4 Graz Tourismus GmbH, Graz 8% Flughafen Graz Betriebs GmbH, Feldkirchen bei Graz Flughafen Graz Sicherheitsdienste GmbH, Feldkirchen bei Graz

Flughafen Graz - Jahresbericht 2008 · 4 Graz Tourismus GmbH, Graz 8% Flughafen Graz Betriebs GmbH, Feldkirchen bei Graz Flughafen Graz Sicherheitsdienste GmbH, Feldkirchen bei Graz

Trade fairs and special interest fairs - Messe Karlsruhe · 2020. 2. 18. · Trade fairs and special interest fairs 02 2021 LEARNTEC is Europe’s largest trade fair for digital learning

Trade fairs and special interest fairs - Messe Karlsruhe · 2020. 2. 18. · Trade fairs and special interest fairs 02 2021 LEARNTEC is Europe’s largest trade fair for digital learning

Presentazione easy fairs

Presentazione easy fairs

Airport Offices Graz - Büroflächen am Flughafen Graz

Airport Offices Graz - Büroflächen am Flughafen Graz

Taxon Name Familie Graz 250 Graz 500 Graz 750 Abies alba

Taxon Name Familie Graz 250 Graz 500 Graz 750 Abies alba

Art Fairs Newspaper

Art Fairs Newspaper

Community Fairs

Community Fairs

VISIBLE HUMAN Project - Genomics & Bioinformatics Graz, Graz

VISIBLE HUMAN Project - Genomics & Bioinformatics Graz, Graz

Talent Career Fairs

Talent Career Fairs

D.sirohi sc. fairs

D.sirohi sc. fairs

SBE19 Graz - Home - TU Graz

SBE19 Graz - Home - TU Graz

Graz University of Technology TU Graz - Study Abroadstudyabroad.wayne.edu/mis-documents/folie_1.pdf · 2005: TU Graz and Uni Graz are founding NAWI Graz 2010: TU Graz, TU Wien and

Graz University of Technology TU Graz - Study Abroadstudyabroad.wayne.edu/mis-documents/folie_1.pdf · 2005: TU Graz and Uni Graz are founding NAWI Graz 2010: TU Graz, TU Wien and

Fairs, Exhibitions & Racing Division Annual Report 2002 … · Fairs, Exhibitions & Racing Division Annual Report 2002 & 2003 Fairs, Exhibitions & Racing Division ... Pomeroy, Herb

Fairs, Exhibitions & Racing Division Annual Report 2002 … · Fairs, Exhibitions & Racing Division Annual Report 2002 & 2003 Fairs, Exhibitions & Racing Division ... Pomeroy, Herb

Folding Questions A Paper about Problems about Paper · Folding Questions – A Paper about Problems about Paper Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria Presented at WFNMC-6, Riga, Latvia,

Folding Questions A Paper about Problems about Paper · Folding Questions – A Paper about Problems about Paper Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria Presented at WFNMC-6, Riga, Latvia,

geometry origami project

Amount: $23.81 |

Format: ms word |, 1-5 chapters |, instant project material download.

geometry origami project

Bank Name: FCMB Bank Account Name: SEDTECH HUBLET INTL Account Type: Savings Account number: 7749601025

geometry origami project

Bank Name: Access Bank Account Name: SEDTECH HUBLET INTL Account Type: Current Account number: 0107807602

EFFECT OF ORIGAMI ON STUDENTS’ ACHIEVEMENT, INTEREST AND RETENTION IN GEOMETRY

This study was designed to explore the effects of Origami instructional approach on JS I students’ achievement, interest and retention in geometry. Six research questions and nine hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. The study adopted a quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design and was restricted to Nsukka local Government Area of Enugu State. Two Co-educational Secondary Schools were drawn for the study using random sampling technique. Out of the two selected schools one was randomly assigned to Origami Group (OG) while the other one to the Control Group (CG). A sample of 101 JS one students was involved (65 female and 36 male students). The instruments for data collection were geometry achievement test GAT) and geometry interest scale (GIS). Data collected were analyzed using mean, standard deviation and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The result of the study revealed that use of Origami in teaching geometry to junior secondary school students enhanced their achievement, interest and retention in geometry. The study also revealed that the use of Origami had no statistically differential effect on male and female students’ achievement, interest and retention. Furthermore, there was no significant interaction between gender and instructional approach on students’ achievement and interest. On the other hand, the study revealed that, there was a significant interaction effect between gender and instructional material on retention of the concepts taught during the study. Based on the findings, the researcher recommended that use of Origami should be adopted in the teaching of geometry (mathematics) in primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of education system. It was also recommended that seminars, workshops and conferences should be mounted by professional bodies, federal and state ministries of education on the use of Origami for mathematics teachers, students and others. This will enable the mathematics educators, serving teachers, students and all to benefit from such an approach.

CHAPTER ONE

Introduction, background of the study.

Among other physical science subjects, mathematics is the backbone in the National capacity building in science and technology (Ogbonna, 2007).  It equips the individual with the capacity to, among others, enumerate, calculate, measure, collate, group, analyze and relate quantities and ideas. In Arts and Humanities, mathematical concepts such as measurement, enlargement, symmetry, sequence, proportion, angle of elevation and depression, provide the baseline for the better understanding of some related universal concepts. It is therefore not a surprise that Mathematics is one of the compulsory core subjects which students must offer and pass at credit level, at the secondary level of education, as a pre-requisite for a useful living within the society and for higher education.

Despite the acknowledged importance of mathematics in national development, and the tremendous efforts being made by educationists and other stakeholders to improve the teaching and learning of the subject in secondary schools in Nigeria, students’ achievement in the subject still remains very low.  The statistics released by the National Examination Council (NECO) and West African Examination Council (WAEC) show that less than 40% of candidates who sat for mathematics in the past ten years (2000-2010), obtained a credit pass, at both the Junior- and Senior Secondary levels respectively. This trend negates the national drive for a sound social and technological development and needs therefore be halted.

The observed low performance of students in Mathematics has been traced to various factors, including weak foundation, especially in geometry, at the formative stage of the students’ education (Kurumeh, 2006), mathematics phobia and lack of interest (Amazigo, 2000), inadequate/ineffective course-delivery strategies adopted by teachers (Ogbonna, 2004; Nzewi, 2000), as well as poor reading/comprehension (poor retention) by students (Agwagah, 1993; Ogbonna, 2007). Many teachers still follow the traditional approach that relies heavily on textbooks, charts and diagrams (Agommuo, 2009).  In the words of Nzewi (2000), effective teaching is synonymous with effective learning/high achievement. Mathematics teachers therefore, have the professional responsibility to help, develop and maintain the interest of students in mathematics by exploring and employing modern concepts and instructional materials that will make their course deliveries more meaningful, effective, practical, productive and understandable.

Instructional resources, according to Offorma (1997) and Eya (2004), stimulate learners’ interest and help both the teacher and the learner to overcome physical limitation during presentation of the subject matters.  According to Usman and Obidua (2005), the use of appropriate instructional material in the classroom enhances motivation, improves comprehension, encourages effective participation, captures students’ interest and thus enhances learning. Both federal and state governments have since adopted these innovative research findings and recommended the use at primary and secondary school levels, of practical teaching method and instructional material.

The visual nature of geometry makes it more amenable to teaching aids, than the other branches of mathematics. Most of the geometrical figures (square, rectangle, triangle, circles and other polygons) can be reproduced by origami (the art of paper folding) and be brought to the classroom to demonstrate the topic. Most of the shapes can also be commercially produced to ensure availability to large number of students.

Origami (the art of paper folding), is widely used in developed countries to teach children to think logically and to follow directions. According to Wu Joseph (2004), the widespread popularity of modern origami grew mainly out of the efforts of one man, Japanese origami master, Akira Yoshizawa, who in the early 1950s began to publish books illustrating how to fold nontraditional models of his own invention. Akira also developed a set of origami diagram symbols that allow a person who has invented a new figure to show others how to arrive at the same form. Virtually all origami books now use Yoshizawa’s diagram symbols. Exhibitions of Yoshizawa’s work around the world introduced origami to many people and led to the formation of origami associations, including the Origami Center of America (now Origami USA) and the British Origami Society.

There are different types of origami folds. These include:

Basic skills for instance, are subdivided into valley fold, mountain fold, pleat fold and blintz fold.

Origami Bases on the other hand consist of fish base , w ater bomb base, preliminary fold, bird base and frog base folds etc. When one folds the traditional water bomb base , for instance, then one has created a crease pattern with eight congruent right triangles and every reverse fold (such as the one to create the birds’ neck or tail) creates four more triangles. In fact, any basic fold has an associated geometric pattern. For the purpose of this study, Origami basic skills were employed.

The folding skill is so practical that it creates strong feeling of curiosity in young children. The capacity of the folding skill to arouse curiosity in children makes it a potential useful teaching strategy. This is because interest is a necessary condition for achievement, as students tend to learn more efficiently those things that interest them than those that do not (Agwagah (2008); Ogbonna (2004)).

Another factor of learning is retention , the ability to remember things. Among the attributes of retention that are closely related to success, are the power to recall (i.e., memory) and to recognize (Ogbonna, 2007). Memory is the capacity to retain an impression of the past experiences. Memory, according to Ogbonna (2007), is classified based on duration, nature and retrieval of perceived items.  The main stages in information and retrieval of memory from an information processing perspective are:

From the above discussion, it is obvious that the ability to retrieve an information or learnt item depends so much on what has been retained in the memory.  Ausbel (1968) asserted that retention may be difficult if the material presented cannot be related to the existing cognitive structure.  Cognitive structure of the individual according to Ausbel is defined as all the information that the individual has about any particular area of experience. Ausbel went further to explain that when students study new materials presented to them, relate the new information to what they know, and organize it into more complete cognitive structure they are engaging in meaningful reception learning that enhances retention.  The implication of this is that any instructional material or approach which is effective in making students retain concepts in mathematics, can as well help students perform excellently in mathematics.  In view of this, retention is an important variable worth exploring in this study.

Another factor of interest in the current research is gender and its influence on achievement.  In the past, there has been a general view that males perform better than females in mathematics. Alio and Harbor Peters (2000) experimented on the Polya’s problem solving techniques and discovered that males have a higher achievement than females in mathematics.  Ozofor (1993), however, discovered that male and female students perform equally in mathematics.  This view was supported by Ogbonna (2004), who used the Invitation, Exploration/Discovery, Proposing Explanation and Solution, Taking Action (IEPT) constructivist instructional approach to show that there is no significant difference between the achievement of male and female students in mathematics. In a similar study, Adekanye (2008) established that girls perform better than boys in mathematics.

In view of the apparent conflicting results on the influence of gender on students’ achievement in mathematics, coupled with the acclaimed role of mathematics  in technological development, there is need to carry out further research to resolve the controversy, by using an instructional strategy that will enhance achievement, foster interest and retention. This can be achieved by the use of appropriate instructional technique that has the capacity to provide equal learning opportunity to both males and females.

Though various strategies have been adopted in the past, for the teaching of geometry, their effectiveness has remained in doubt, as students’ achievement in this aspect of mathematics still remains low.  This is why the current research focuses on a new and alternative technique –application of the art  of paper-folding (origami),  to  find out how it can influence students achievement, interest and retention in geometry.

Statement of the Problem

It is a well-known fact that the subject of mathematics affects all aspects of human life and that the social, economic, scientific and technological aspects of man are centered on numbers. Being the basic skill that underlies all scientific and technological skills, mathematics is generally seen as the language of most branches of science and technology. It is closely related to other school subjects that deal with numeration, variation, graphs, fractions, logarithms and indices, algebraic processes, solution of equation, as well as areas and volume computations. Expectedly, a sound background in basic mathematical principles has become a pre-condition for progression to tertiary education and thus one of the key requirements for a gainful professional employment. Among the other branches of mathematics, mensuration, which comprises geometrical and trigonometrical concepts of the JSS Mathematics Curriculum, represents the most difficult area (Kurumeh, 2006; Chief examiner’s report, 2006). Even though various instructional techniques have been adopted by teachers to improve students’ achievement in mathematics, very few of these appear to have focused on the teaching of geometry. Traditional teaching aids for mathematics include chalk boards, coins, and legos, while visual aids and drawing of pictures have been used in teaching of geometry. Helpful as these measures may be, they have not proved to be effective for the improvement of students’ performance in mathematics. There is therefore need to explore the effectiveness of other alternative teaching strategies, such as origami, in the improvement of students achievement, interest and retention in geometry. Therefore the problem of the study put in question form is “Would the use of origami as instructional approach/materials enhance students’ achievement, interest and retention in geometry?”

Purpose of the study

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of origami on students’ achievement, interest and retention in geometry.

Specifically, this study sought to determine:

Significance of the study

Research results abound on the teaching of mathematics most of which are based on pedagogical theories applicable to the teaching and learning of mathematics. This implies that, the search for any new and relevant methods of teaching mathematics is expected to be based on a particular pedagogical theory. Consequently, this study uses Piagetian constructivist theory of learning which emphasizes the teachers’ ability to present instruction in such a way that students are actively involved. Piaget also emphasizes on the use of actual objects to teach young children up to the age of twelve or thirteen, for without it, the subject will become very abstract. The study also took into consideration blooms taxonomy of education in sequencing instruction. This was to ensure that the students’ interest is made proficient in the three domains of cognitive, affective and psychomotor. The implication of this is that if this instructional material is found appropriate, both the teacher, students, curriculum planners, textbook authors, the government and the society at large will benefit.

The outcome of this study will help teachers to present geometry in JS1 in such a way and manner that the student will understand it, appreciate it and participate in solving such problems as properties of plane shapes, angles and triangles, bisecting of lines without much difficulty. More so, it will enable the teachers to discard the use of the conventional instructional approach which do not help to reduce abstraction. In other words, the result of the present study will help mathematics teachers to adjust their teaching strategies.

It is hoped that the finding of this study will enable students’ show much interest in the study of geometry, thereby increasing overall achievement in mathematics. This study can be seen as a concrete step towards the attainment of the global goal of mathematics for all. The use of origami has the potentials of creating uniform conditions for both boys and girls in the learning of geometry. In this way, students irrespective of their sex can have unimpeded access and participation in geometry and mathematics at large.

The outcome of this present study could also lead to the attainment of cognitive skills which can be applied to other areas. As a result, more students may be going for mathematics courses which will lead to scientific and technological advancement of the country.

The result of this study is expected to motivate the curriculum planners and government to

The outcome of this study when made available to ministries of education can generate interest and need for workshops on how to use this aspect of mathematics.

The findings of the study would provide authors of secondary school text books with information on the efficacy of origami. This will reduce abstraction in their presentation of geometry topics in their textbooks. More so, the findings may also reveal the activity-oriented nature of origami and thus provide additional useful mathematical instructional strategy/material for the teaching and learning of geometry.

The findings of this study would also help the society in the sense that, more students would be achieving higher in mathematics. This in turn will reduce the rate of failure in mathematics at both internal and external examinations, thus, making the parents happy.

Scope of the study

This study focuses on geometry, the aspect of mathematics where Junior Secondary School students have been shown to record the lowest achievement (Kajuru, 2006). The study is conducted using JSS-1 students in the Nsukka Local Government Area of Enugu State. In terms of content coverage, the topics selected include:

These topics are as provided in Junior Secondary-one Mathematics curriculum (FME, 2007)

Research Questions

The following research questions guide the study:

The following null hypotheses (HOs) were formed to guide the study and were tested at 0.05 level of significance.

HO 1 : There is no significant difference in the mean achievement scores of students taught geometry using origami and those taught using conventional approach.

HO 2 : There is no significant difference in the mean interest scores of students taught geometry using origami and those taught using conventional approach.

HO 3 : There is no significant interaction effect of origami and gender as measured by the geometry achievement test.

HO 4 : – There is no significant difference in the mean achievement scores of male and female students taught geometry using origami.

HO 5 :   There is no significant difference in the mean interest scores of male and female students taught geometry using origami.

HO 6 :   There is no significant interaction effect of origami and gender as measured by the geometry interest inventory or scale.

HO 7 : There is no significant difference in the mean retention scores of students taught geometry using origami and those taught using the conventional approach.

HO 8 : There is no significant difference in the mean retention scores of male and female students taught geometry using origami.

HO 9 : There is no significant interaction effect of origami and gender as measured by the geometry retention test.

' src=

Author: SPROJECT NG

Choose currency, choose your department.

Most Top Download

Find any project topic on sprojectng.

Copyright © 2023 Final Year Research Project Topics and Materials

IMAGES

  1. Kinga Kubowicz Has Created Moduuli, A Collection Of Geometric Origami

    geometry origami project

  2. Origami Geometry

    geometry origami project

  3. Color It Like you MEAN it!: construction paper

    geometry origami project

  4. FREE Geometric Origami Project in 2021

    geometry origami project

  5. The Math and Art in Origami

    geometry origami project

  6. Nerd arts & crafts. Printable, foldable geometric shapes

    geometry origami project

VIDEO

  1. Origami (Clearer Version)

  2. 3D Simulation

  3. Geometria dell'origami

  4. Geometry Dash mobile 4 spice Possible

  5. Big Card Through Small Hole

  6. How to make Complex Origami

COMMENTS

  1. Fun and Easy Origami Projects For Kids!

    Read on to find five fun, engaging and easy to follow origami projects for kids of all ages to do when bored. By labelling an origami structure with length, width and height, students can learn the key components and ways to describe a shape

  2. In Quarantine? Here Are 10 Easy Origami Projects For Kids

    Here are 10 Easy Origami projects that kids (or adults) can enjoy making in small groups or by themselves. Origami is the perfect activity to do with kids at home during self isolation or quarantine

  3. School Projects in Paper Arts

    Are you an educator and want to incorporate School Projects with origami and paper arts into your program? Below is a list of origami and paper projects which I teach to first graders through 3rd graders

  4. Geometry Honors Projects

    Geometry Honors Projects Copy - Free download as PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. origami models and then use the language of geometry to tell others how to make them. To communicate the origami model that you designed

  5. Geometry Project: Origami by Kevin Nguyen

    Step 2 Take the two top corners and bring them down to the middle. History of Origami Step 1 Instructions to making a Paper Airplane Paper was probably invented by the Chinese

  6. Paper Artist London

    Jul 30, 2020 - Foldability is a London based design studio run by Kyla McCallum, a Set Designer and Paper Artist who has been working with origami for over 10 years

  7. (PPT) Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria

    Slide 1 Origami Geometry Projects for Math Fairs Robert Geretschläger Graz, Austria Slide 2 6 Problems from 1 Fold 1.Prove that C‘D‘ is a tangent of the circle with…

  8. EFFECT OF ORIGAMI ON STUDENTS' ACHIEVEMENT, INTEREST AND RETENTION IN GEOMETRY

    This study was designed to explore the effects of Origami instructional approach on JS I students' achievement, interest and retention in geometry. Six research questions and nine hypotheses were formulated to guide the study