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First Conditional Games, Activities, Lesson Plans & Worksheets

If you’re looking for some of the best first conditional games and activities, then you’re definitely in the right place! We have more than 20 of them, along with worksheets, lesson plans, online practice recommendations and more.

first conditional games

First conditional games and activities

First Conditional Structure

In case you need a primer for what the 1st conditional structure is, here it is! We use it to talk about future situations that we believe are real or possible. Some examples:

  • If it doesn’t rain tomorrow, we’ll go for a bike ride.
  • If the Oilers win this game, they’ll be first in their division.
  • I’ll let you know if I finish work early and can play.

The structure is usually: 

If + present simple + will + infinitive (if can also be in the middle of the sentence).

It’s also possible to replace “if” with the following:

  • unless (Unless you do your homework regularly, you’ll fail that class).
  • as long as (As long as I’m happy, I’ll stay at that job).
  • as soon as (As soon as I’m done work, I’ll come home).
  • in case (I’ll give you a key in case I’m not home tomorrow).

More ideas for teaching conditionals here: Zero Conditional Worksheets , Third Conditional Games and Teaching the Second Conditional .

First Conditional Activities and Games

Let’s get into the best first conditional speaking activities for all ages!

#1: Three in a Row

Make up a worksheet with a bunch of result clauses. Then, put students into pairs and each pair will play against another pair (4 students total) with one of the worksheets. The goal is to get three squares in a row.

One partner says an “if” clause. Their partner can use one of the result clauses on the worksheet. If it makes sense, they mark the square off as theirs and the other teams goes.

#2: Dicto Gloss Activity

This is a challenging listening activity for higher-level students. Find or write a passage with a few first conditional statements. Then, put students into pairs and read it out at a faster than usual pace. Students have to take notes and try to recreate what they just heard. Repeat the process and then students compare their version with the original one. Find out more about it:

ESL Dicto Gloss Activity .

#3: Running Dictation

This is one of my favourite 4-skills ESL activities for all ages! Find, or write a conversation that makes good use of 1st conditional statements (the textbook you’re using may have a good one). Then, students have to work together to dictate the convo and then put it into the correct order. Find out more about it:

#4: Concentration

This is a fun memory game that helps students focus on meanings and 1st conditional statements. Make some sentences and then put each clause on a separate card. For example:

  • If it rains / I won’t go to the beach
  • If I finish my homework / I’ll go to the party tonight
  • As long as Tammy is my boss / I’ll stay at that job

Then, students have to match cards. Check it out:

Concentration Game .

#5: Mixed Up Sentences

This is a nice activity for helping students work on forms. Make a bunch of sentences using the 1st conditional and mix them up in terms of word order. Students have to work with a partner to unscramble them.

#6: The Conditional Chain

Start the game off by saying the first half of a first conditional statement. The next player has to add a clause to complete the statement. The next player takes that new clause and makes a new first half of the statement. Does that make sense? Keep going, adding new clauses. The teacher or other classmates can assist students who can’t come up with something.

#7: Dialogue Substitution

Have you ever noticed that students seem to just kind of blow through dialogues that they have to read with a partner and they don’t really pay attention to what they’re reading? One of the best ways to combat this is to remove some of the key words. They can be things related to grammar or meaning. Find out more about it here:

#8: Is that Sentence Correct?

Conditional statements involve somewhat tricky grammar. The word order can sometimes be confusing which is why I like to do this simple activity. I make a bunch of sentences using the target grammar and in pairs, students have to decide if the sentence is correct. If it’s incorrect, they have to change it. Find out more here:

Is that Sentence Correct Activity? 

#9: Pass the Paper

In this activity, students write down four clauses. Two are the first half of a first conditional and two of them are the last half. Then, they pass the paper to a partner who finishes the statements.

#10: Sentence Structure Activities

Conditionals are heavy on the sentence structure! They can get a little bit tricky, particularly if you teach about more than one of them in a single lesson. Students really have to master word order and verb tenses for this one. Have a look here at some of the best ideas for this:

ESL Sentence Structure Activities .

#11: First Conditional Speaking Lesson Plan

It’s easier than you might think to plan a lesson about almost anything. Check out this video for the steps to follow:

#12: Partner Conversation Starters

If you tell students to use the first conditional and talk to their partners, you may be met with silence! It’s entirely the teacher’s fault! The students haven’t really been given enough to work with.

Instead, help students out by giving them some conversation starters or questions. For example,

  • If this class finishes early, what will you do?
  • If you get the day off tomorrow, what will you do?

#13: The Flyswatter Game

To focus on meaning, write the second half of numerous 1st conditional statements on the whiteboard. One student from each team comes up to the board and takes a flyswatter. It works best to have mostly generic kinds of statements that could fit a bunch of different situations.

The teacher says the first half of one of the statements and then the first student to slap something that fits gets a point for their team. Learn more about it:

Flyswatter Game .

#14: Consider Using the Test Teach Test Approach

It’s likely that your students may already be familiar with conditionals. If that’s the case, why not give them a little bit of a test first to see what they know? Then, tailor the lesson to what they don’t. After that, give them another little test to see what they’ve picked up.

This kind of lesson can be a nice way to tailor the lesson specifically to the needs of the students. It’s also a change of pace from the usual presentation-practice-production model. Learn more about it here:

#15: First Conditional Movies and TV Clips

If you take a look on YouTube, you’ll see a ton of compilations of clips from popular TV shows and movies that use this grammatical structure. This can make a nice warm-up or review activity or form the basis of an entire lesson. Have a quick look around and you’re sure to find something that’ll work.

#16: Me Too!

Me Too is a simple speaking and listening activity that can help students get some practice with these kinds of statements. Students say a true statement that uses the target grammar. If other students could say the same thing about themselves, they stand up and say, “Me too!”

#17: Error Correction Relay Race

I love this game because it takes something old and boring (error correction) and turns it into something fun. Write a passage with the target grammar, and then make a few mistakes. Make sure you tell students how many mistakes there are.

In teams, students have to work together to find them all. You can find out more about it right here:

Error Correction Relay .

#18: Vocabulary Auction

If you want to have some fun with making sentences in your class, this is the game to play! Find out how to do it:

#19: Dictation Practice

Dictation is a nice activity to focus on forms. Dictate some questions that use the target grammar for the students. They have to write them down and then answer the question. Alternatively, you could dictate some statements and they have to make up the questions.

#20: Person on the Street Interview Activity

This is a fun way to make something old (talking with a partner). Students have to chat with someone on the street to get their opinions or ideas about something. In this case, they’d have to use a 1st conditional question. Check it out:

Person on the Street Interview Activity .

#21: Real-Life Scenarios

Present students with real-life scenarios or dilemmas that they might encounter. For example, “If you forget your homework, what will you do?” or “If you are running late for a bus, how will you catch it?” Have students discuss and share their ideas using the first conditional structure.

#22: Mix and Match

Create a set of sentence cards, with the condition on one card and the consequence on another. Shuffle the cards and distribute them to students. Students must find their match by pairing the condition and consequence cards, forming complete first conditional sentences.

#23: Song Lyrics Analysis

Choose a song that contains examples of the first conditional, and provide students with the lyrics. Have them identify and underline the first conditional sentences in the song. Then, discuss the meaning and context of those sentences, encouraging students to reflect on how the first conditional is used in popular culture.

#24: Story Writing

Ask students to write short stories that incorporate the first conditional. Provide them with a starting sentence or a prompt that sets up a condition, and have them develop the story based on the consequences that would occur. Students can then share and discuss their stories with their classmates.

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First Conditional Games Online

My students often ask me to recommend some online games to them so that they can practice their English grammar. Here are some of my favourite options for the 1st conditional:

ESL Kids Games

Games to Learn English

Grammar Worksheet First Conditional

Check out these worksheets for additional practice:

Live Worksheets

ISL Collective

Perfect English Grammar

First Conditional Lesson Plans

Save some time and effort by using lesson plans that others have already made! Here are some of the top recommendations:

Off 2 Class

Lingua House

FAQs about the 1st Conditional

There are a number of common questions that people have. Here are the answers to some of the most popular ones.

What are some first conditional examples?

Some first conditional examples are:

  • If it rains, I won’t go hiking.
  • She’ll miss the train if she doesn’t leave soon.

What are the four types of conditionals?

The four types of conditionals are zero, first, second, and third.

How do you teach the first conditional?

To teach the first conditional, be sure to set the context of the lesson. Then, focus on meaning and forms and give students some practice opportunities. Assign some homework and don’t forget review in the next lesson.

How can I introduce the first conditional to ESL students?

Start by explaining that it’s used for real or likely future situations. Use everyday examples to illustrate the structure and meaning.

What are some common first conditional keywords or phrases?

Words like “if,” “unless,” “when,” and “provided that” are often used to introduce the condition in the first conditional.

Can you provide some example sentences in the first conditional?

Sure, here are a few: “If she studies, she will pass the exam.” “I’ll be late unless you call me.” “If it snows, we can go sledding.”

How can I practice the first conditional with ESL students?

Use role-plays, create situations where students make predictions or decisions, and have them write sentences using the first conditional.

What’s the difference between the zero conditional and the first conditional?

The zero conditional is used for general truths or facts, while the first conditional is used for specific future situations based on real conditions.

Are there any common errors ESL students make with the first conditional?

Students often mistakenly use “will” in both parts of the sentence instead of just in the result clause. Regular practice helps correct this.

How can I make teaching the 1st conditional more engaging?

Use interactive activities like problem-solving scenarios, discussions about future plans, and fun games that involve making predictions.

Can you recommend any resources or materials for teaching the first conditional?

You can find worksheets, online exercises, and textbooks designed for teaching conditionals in ESL that offer structured practice and examples.

What’s the main goal when teaching the 1st conditional?

The main goal is for students to understand and use the structure correctly to discuss future events based on real conditions, making them more proficient in practical English.

first conditional activities

First conditional speaking activities and games

First Conditional Activities: Join the Conversation

Do you have any first conditional speaking activities that you’d like to add to the list? Leave a comment below and let us know what you think. We’d love to hear from you.

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homework for first conditional

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First Conditional – Free Exercise

Complete the first conditional sentences.

  • If I (bump)     into Claire, I (tell)     her you said hello. 1. if-clause: simple present|2. main clause: will + infinitive
  • People (be)     happy if there (be)     enough food and drink. 1. main clause: will + infinitive|2. if-clause: simple present
  • We (call)     you if your parcel (arrive)     today. 1. main clause: will + infinitive|2. if-clause: simple present
  • They (come)     if she (send)     them a hand-written invitation. 1. main clause: will + infinitive|2. if-clause: simple present
  • If Tom (have)     enough money left over, he (book)     a holiday. 1. if-clause: simple present|2. main clause: will + infinitive
  • If Charlie (buy)     a new TV, he (not/have)     enough money to pay his rent. 1. if-clause: simple present|2. negative main clause: won’t + infinitive
  • If you (not/learn)     the key vocabulary, you (not/pass)     the test. 1. negative if-clause: simple present, 2 nd person singular → don’t + infinitive|2. negative main clause: won’t + infinitive
  • They (not/be)     angry if you (tell)     them the truth. 1. negative main clause: won’t + infinitive|2. if-clause: simple present
  • She (not/change)     her mind if he (keep)     asking her. 1. negative main clause: won’t + infinitive|2. if-clause: simple present
  • His health (not/get)     better if he (not/stop)     smoking. 1. negative main clause: won’t + infinitive|2. negative if-clause: simple present, 3 rd person singular → doesn’t + infinitive

Complete the first conditional questions.

  • If you (be)     in town later, (you/buy)     some milk? 1. if-clause: simple present|2. question in main clause: will + subject + infinitive
  • (she/cancel)     the wedding if she (find)     out the secret? 1. question in main clause: will + subject + infinitive|2. if-clause: simple present
  • If you (have)     time later, (you/help)     me with the dishes? 1. if-clause: simple present|2. question in main clause: will + subject + infinitive
  • (they/be)     angry if I (not/come)     to their party? 1. question in main clause: will + subject + infinitive|2. negative if-clause: simple present, 1 st person singular → don’t + infinitive
  • If I (not/do)     the assignment, (I/be)     in trouble? 1. negative if-clause: simple present, 1 st person singular → don‘t + infinitive|2. question in main clause: will + subject + infinitive

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First Conditional: Examples, Sentences, Exercises

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When do we use the first conditional?

We use the first conditional to talk about results of possible future conditions. Here are some example sentences:

  • If it’s sunny tomorrow, I’ll go to the beach.
  • If it rains tomorrow, I’ll stay home.
  • If she studies hard, she will pass the exam.
  • If you finish your chores, you can watch TV.
  • If we don’t get to the airport on time, we’ll miss our flight.
  • If he doesn’t call me soon, I’ll send him a text message.
  • If you save money, you’ll be able to afford that new phone.
  • If the restaurant isn’t too crowded, we’ll have dinner there tonight.

First Conditional: Examples, Sentences, Exercises Espresso English

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Parts of a first conditional sentence

There are two parts to a first conditional sentence:

  • the condition (sometimes called the “if clause”)
  • the result  (sometimes called the “main clause”)

It is possible to reverse the condition and the result, with no change in meaning:

  • If you don’t study, you’ll fail.
  • = You’ll fail if you don’t study.
  • If I wake up early enough tomorrow, I’m going to make a big breakfast.
  • = I’m going to make a big breakfast if I wake up early enough tomorrow.

Note that when the “if clause” (condition) comes first in the sentence, we use a comma after it. However, when the result comes first in the sentence, then we don’t use a comma between the two clauses.

First Conditional: Examples, Sentences, Exercises Espresso English

How to form the first conditional

Pay close attention to the correct verb forms in the condition and result:

CONDITION:  if + subject + present simple

  • If we go to the party tomorrow,
  • If you don’t leave work soon,
  • If she gets promoted,
  • If he doesn’t read the textbook,

RESULT:  subject + simple future (will / won’t, going to / not going to)

  • we’ll have a good time.
  • you’ll get stuck in rush hour traffic.
  • she’s going to earn more money.
  • he won’t understand the class.

Even though BOTH events are in the future, we always use the simple present  in the condition (“if-clause”).

Avoid the common error of using the simple future in the condition:

  • If we will go to the party tomorrow, we’ll have a good time.
  • If we  go  to the party tomorrow, we’ll have a good time.
  • If it won’t rain tonight, I’ll go for a walk.
  • If it doesn’t rain tonight, I’ll go for a walk.

First Conditional: Examples, Sentences, Exercises Espresso English

Both the condition and the result can be positive or negative (with “not”):

  • If you take the train, you ‘ll get there faster. (positive condition – positive result)
  • If you don’t take the train, you ‘ll have to drive. (negative condition – positive result)
  • If you take the train, you won’t get stuck in traffic. (positive condition – negative result)
  • If you don’t take the train, you won’t need to buy a train ticket. (negative condition – negative result)

First Conditional Quiz

Variations in first conditional sentences, alternative words to “if” in the condition.

It is possible to use other words instead of  if  in the “condition” part of first conditional sentences:

Let’s study each case separately.

WHEN: When the “condition” will definitely happen in the future.

Look at the difference between these two sentences:

  • If I see Sam, I’ll give him your message. (I’m not sure if I will see him or not)
  • When I see Sam, I’ll give him your message. (I will definitely see Sam)

AS SOON AS: To emphasize immediacy.

  • My feet hurt! As soon as I get home, I’m going to take off these high heels.
  • As soon as we have enough money saved, we’ll take a vacation to Costa Rica. We can’t wait!
  • I’ll respond to your e-mail as soon as I can.

UNLESS: Substitute for “if not.”

  • You won’t lose any weight unless you start eating healthier food. = You won’t lose any weight if  you  don’t start eating healthier food.
  • I’m not going to dance unless somebody invites me. = I’m not going to dance if somebody doesn’t invite me.
  • Unless there’s an emergency at work, I’ll be home on time. = If there’s not an emergency at work, I’ll be home on time.

First Conditional: Examples, Sentences, Exercises Espresso English

Alternative words to will / going to in the result

Instead of will / going to, we can use modal verbs like can, might, could, or  should . Compare these two sentences:

  • If you go out in the rain, you  will  get wet. (100% certain)
  • If you apply for that university, you might/could be accepted. (not 100% certain)

Use  can  in the result of first conditional sentences to give permission / prohibition:

  • If you finish your homework, you can watch TV for an hour.
  • If you don’t have a ticket, you can’t get into the theater.

Use might/ could  to express a possibility that is not a certainty:

  • If he gets home from work early, we could go for a walk before dinner.
  • If you try to lift that heavy weight, you  might  hurt yourself.

Use  should  to give advice if the condition happens:

  • If your toothache doesn’t get better soon, you should  see a dentist.
  • If they go to New York next week, they  should visit the Statue of Liberty.

First Conditional vs. Other Conditionals

First conditional vs. zero conditional.

The zero conditional describes GENERAL truths and facts. Both the condition and result are in the simple present:

  • When it rains, the ground gets wet. (it is a general fact/truth)
  • If I’m late to school, the teacher always yells at me. (this ALWAYS happens)

The first conditional describes a specific event that will/might happen in the future IF a future condition happens. The condition is in the simple present tense, and the result is in the simple future tense:

  • If it rains tomorrow, I’m going to stay home.
  • If I’m late to school today, I’ll miss an important test.

First Conditional vs. Second Conditional and Third Conditional

Both the second conditional and third conditional describe IMAGINARY situations.

In the second conditional , we are imagining the result if the present were different:

  • If I were a millionaire, I would buy a sports car. (but the reality is that I AM NOT a millionaire, so I’m not buying that car)

In the third conditional, we are imagining the result if the past had been different:

  • If I had taken the earlier train, I would have gotten to work on time. (but the reality is that I DID NOT take the earlier train, so I did not get to work on time)

The first conditional describes REAL future results/possibilities that will happen if the condition happens. Compare these conditional sentences:

  • First conditional: If I have some free time this weekend, I will read a book. (it’s a real possibility that I’ll have some free time and read a book)
  • Second conditional:  If I had more free time, I would take dance classes. (this is just imaginary – the reality is that I don’t have much free time, so I’m not taking dance classes)
  • Third conditional:  If I ‘d had more free time yesterday, I would have cleaned the house. (imaginary – the reality is that I didn’t have free time yesterday, so I didn’t clean the house)

Learn more about the first conditional with this tutorial

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First Conditional: Examples, Sentences, Exercises Espresso English

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Conditionals: zero, first and second

Conditionals: zero, first and second

Do you know how to use the zero, first and second conditionals? Test what you know with interactive exercises and read the explanation to help you.

Look at these examples to see how zero, first and second conditionals are used.

If you freeze water, it becomes solid. If it rains tomorrow, I'll take the car. If I lived closer to the cinema, I would go more often.

Try this exercise to test your grammar.

Conditionals 1: Grammar test 1

Read the explanation to learn more.

Grammar explanation

Conditionals describe the result of a certain condition. The if  clause tells you the condition ( If you study hard ) and the main clause tells you the result ( you will pass your exams ). The order of the clauses does not change the meaning.

If you study hard, you will pass your exams. You will pass your exams if you study hard.

Conditional sentences are often divided into different types.

Zero conditional

We use the zero conditional to talk about things that are generally true, especially for laws and rules.

If I drink too much coffee, I can't sleep at night. Ice melts if you heat it. When the sun goes down, it gets dark.

The structure is:  if /w hen + present simple >> present simple.

First conditional

We use the first conditional when we talk about future situations we believe are real or possible.

If it doesn't rain tomorrow, we'll go to the beach. Arsenal will be top of the league if they win. When I finish work, I'll call you.

In first conditional sentences, the structure is usually: if / when + present simple >> will + infinitive. 

It is also common to use this structure with unless , as long as,   as soon as  or in case instead of if .

I'll leave as soon as the babysitter arrives. I don't want to stay in London unless I get a well-paid job. I'll give you a key in case I'm not at home. You can go to the party, as long as you're back by midnight.

Second conditional

The second conditional is used to imagine present or future situations that are impossible or unlikely in reality.

If we had a garden, we could have a cat. If I won a lot of money, I'd buy a big house in the country. I wouldn't worry if I were you.

The structure is usually:  if + past simple >> + would + infinitive. 

When if is followed by the verb be, it is grammatically correct to say if I were , if he were , if she were and if it were . However, it is also common to hear these structures with was , especially in the he / she form.

If I were you, I wouldn't mention it. If she was prime minister, she would invest more money in schools. He would travel more if he was younger.

Do this exercise to test your grammar again.

Conditionals 1: Grammar test 2

Language level

Why when you are using the zero conditional, you say "If I were (...)" instead of "if I was (...)"?

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Hi lolamaserola,

This is actually the second conditional. "Were" in "If I were ..." is a verb form called the past subjunctive, which is not used so much in modern English but is still used in a few phrases and structures such as after  if , if only ,  as if , as though  and  I wish . 

It is also acceptable to use the past simple form instead, e.g.  I wish I was rich .

I hope that helps.

LearnEnglish team

Thank you for the lesson.

Hello, If he falls off his bicycle, he gets hurt. Or If he falls off his bicycle, he will get hurt. Thank you so much

Hello Ivyxoxo,

The first sentence (with zero conditional) is possible but unlikely. It means that every time he falls off his bicycle, he gets hurt. This might be true, but it's difficult for me to imagine a situation when I'd use this sentence.

The second sentence (first conditional) means that possibly he will fall and if he does, he will get hurt. 

Best wishes, Kirk LearnEnglish team

Hello, I would like to know that we may not drink too much coffee but why we still use zero conditional in the sentence “If I drink too much coffee, I can't sleep at night.”

This sentence means the same as 'When I drink too much coffee, I can't sleep at night'. It means that it always happen when you drink too much coffee.

If it doesn't always happen but you think that it might happen, it'd be better to use a first conditional: 'If I drink too much coffee, I won't be able to sleep at night'.

Hello, dear teachers and team!

May this year bring you lots of happiness and joy!

Could you please help me with the following:

Can we use the second conditional to talk about real events from the past, like

A. If we wanted to, we would travel to different cities at any time. (Both parts are real in the past) Is this sentence correct, and what about these ones to talk about real past:

B. If we had wanted to, we used to travel to different cities at any time

C. If we wanted to, we used to travel to different cities at any time.

2. Can the second conditional be used instead of the third one in informal speech? Can I say "If he didn't miss the bus yesterday, he would be on time for the meeting" instead of "If he hadn't missed the bus yesterday, he would have been on time for the meeting"? And if I can, is it possible in both British and American English?

I'm always grateful for your constant help with confusing issues and thank you very much indeed for your answer to this post beforehand!

Hello howtosay_,

1) By definition, a second conditional only talks about unreal events in the present or future.

That said, you can certainly use past tenses to refer to real past events. Both sentences A and C are correct, for example, assuming the traveling to different cities was something the speaker did regularly.

Sentence B doesn't make sense to me. As far as I can think it's not impossible to use a past perfect to refer to a real past event, but in this case I find it confusing. 

2) We probably use mixed conditionals more often in informal speech, but it could be confusing not to use the past perfect form when referring to an unreal past event, i.e. something that did not occur. Perhaps some people might not use the form occasionally, but it could be confusing not to use the form properly, particularly if you're a non-native speaker.

Hope this helps!

would you tell me what the difference is between “I don't want to stay in London unless I get a well-paid job" and "I won't want to stay in London unless I get a well-paid job"

​thanks in advance

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  • First Conditional

  • If we work hard, we will finish the project on time.

This is an example of a first conditional sentence. The first part is in the present simple tense and the second part is in the future simple tense. What does this mean?

First Conditionals – If clauses

Also known as Type 1 conditionals (real present)

The first conditional is used to express a real or very probable situation in the present or future. It is for things that will possibly happen in the future if a condition is met. In a way, we are predicting a likely result in the future if a certain condition happens.

The first conditional uses the present simple in the if-clause and the future simple in the main clause .

If + Present Simple, Future Simple

(If + condition, result)

Let’s look at this sentence again:

The condition is: if we work hard. This is an if-clause because it begins with IF.

What is the result of this if-clause? The result is: we will finish the project on time.

Also, we have to use a comma at the end of an if-clause , when an if-clause comes at the beginning of the sentence.

Here I am saying it is possible that we will finish the project on time on the condition of working hard now. I am predicting that this is the likely result in the future. The main clause is in the future simple tense… we WILL finish.

It is also important to note that the if-clause must be in the present simple tense. We say: If we work hard, we will finish the project on time. We cannot say: If we will work hard… (this is NOT correct)

Here are some more example sentences of the first conditional.

  • If you like Suzy Singer, then you’ ll love her new album. (Remember: you’ll is a contraction of you will .)
  • If you take this medicine, you will feel much better.
  • A: Where are my keys? B: If you look in the garage, you will find them.
  • Don’t worry. If I see John, I won’t tell him about the surprise. (You can see that we can use a negative form of the future simple… won’t is a contraction of will not )
  • If I don’t feel well tomorrow, I won’t go to work.
  • If the weather is nice tomorrow, we will have a picnic at the park.
  • If he doesn’t arrive soon, we will leave without him.

Notice how there is a comma after the if-clause .

Look at this sentence:

  • If it rains tomorrow, we will stay home.

Remember, we cannot say “If it will rain tomorrow”. The if-clause needs to be in the present simple tense.

Result + if + condition

We can also change the order of the sentence and have the main clause (the result) before the if-clause (the condition).

How can we change our example sentence (If it rains tomorrow, we will stay home) to this order? We say:

  • We will stay home if it rains tomorrow.

Note that with this order, we do NOT use a comma between the clauses.

Let’s change the order of the example sentences we have already seen.

  • You will find them if you look in the garage.
  • You will feel much better if you take this medicine.
  • I won’t tell John about the surprise if I see him.
  • We will leave without him if he doesn’t arrive soon.

Possible plans, promises, warnings, threats, persuasion

The first conditional is common when we are talking about possible plans , promises , warnings , threats or for persuading someone. We are predicting a likely result in the future if a condition is fulfilled.

  • If I go to Egypt next month for work, I’ll visit the pyramids. (plans)
  • If I have time, I will do help you. (promise)
  • If you touch that wire, you will get an electric shock. (warning)
  • If you eat my chocolate, you’ll sleep outside with the dog. (threat)
  • If you drive us to the concert, I’ll pay for the parking. (persuasion)

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First Conditional IF Exercise

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Simple explanation and exercise to introduce the first conditional. Sentence 18 IS negative. I'll change it a.s.a.p.

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First conditional

Homework: First Conditional

Pre-intermediate

Just when students have mastered the basic English tenses, along come Conditionals! And with so many of them to master, they can be a stumbling block for many learners. This is why a sound knowledge of each type is essential before they are later faced with the inevitable dilemma of deciding which conditional to use when. This handy homework sheet helps students practise the First Conditional in a variety of different ways.

After downloading your PDF: print it immediately or save and print later. Answers are provided for teachers on the second page.

Make your own worksheets with the free EnglishClub Worksheet Maker !

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First Conditional Questions

If I teach you how to use the first conditional, will you practice it today? First conditional questions like this are used very often by native English speakers and so it is important for English language learners to learn how to ask and answer first conditional questions. Below you’ll find many examples of first conditional questions you can use to practice speaking using the first conditional in English.

Related:  How To Teach The First Conditional – Step By Step

Here are many examples of first conditional questions.

  • If it rains tomorrow, what will you do?
  • What will you do if you get lost?
  • If you arrive late to work, will you be fired?
  • Will you be upset if you miss the movie tonight?
  • If you want to leave, where will you go?
  • Where will you go eat if you get hungry?
  • If you are available next weekend, will you go to the mall with me?
  • What would you do if you lost your keys?
  • If the show gets canceled, what should we do?
  • Will she mind if I borrow her shoes?
  • If we are out of oranges, what will you eat?
  • Will your parents be surprised if you come home for the holidays?
  • If we run out of gas, who would you call?
  • Where can I study if the library is closed?
  • If you fail your exam, what will you do?
  • Who will teach the class if our professor gets sick?
  • If you don’t answer the phone, should I come over?
  • What will you do if the party is canceled?
  • If I can’t come to your party, will you be upset?
  • What can we do if the mall is closed?

First Conditional Questions

First Conditional Questions PDF

How to make first conditional sentences and questions.

There are two structures for creating first conditional sentences and questions. These are:

  • If + Condition, + Result.
  • Result + If + Condition.

The  condition  is stated in the  present simple tense  and expresses something that may or may not happen. For example, “ If class is canceled …”. The  result  is stated as  will/won’t + base verb  and expresses what will definitely happen if the condition is met. For example, “ I’ll go to the mall .”

Sentence Structure 1: If + Condition + Result

“ If class is canceled, I’ll go to the mall .”

Sentence Structure 2: Result + If + Condition

“ I’ll go to the mall if class is canceled .”

Question Structure 1: If + Condition + Result

“ If class is canceled, what will you do? ”

Question Structure 2: Result + If + Condition

“ What will you do if class is canceled? ”

In these examples, notice how the future possibility is based on a specific condition. If that condition is met, then the result will happen. So, we don’t know whether or not class will be canceled, but if it is canceled, we will go to the mall.

When making first conditional sentences and questions, the word “will” can be substituted for other modal verbs or imperatives. Modal verbs are words like  can ,  could ,  may ,  might ,  shall ,  should ,  would , and  must . Imperatives are statements that make a command. For example,

  • “If class is canceled, I can go to the mall. ”
  • “ If class is canceled, we should go to the mall. ”
  • “ If class is canceled, go home .”
  • “ If class is canceled, meet me at the mall. ”

Thanks for reading. I hope you found these first conditional questions and examples useful. Before you go, be sure to check out the related resources below .

Related Resources

  • Zero Conditional Examples
  • First Conditional Examples
  • Second Conditional Examples
  • Third Conditional Examples
  • How To Teach The Zero Conditional
  • How To Teach The First Conditional
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  • How To Teach The Third Conditional

First Conditional Worksheet

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  • Last updated on 13 October, 2023

homework for first conditional

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STUDY, COME, RING, BRING, BUY, ARRIVE, BE, TELL, PASS, RAIN, DO (x2), ANSWER, VISIT, FEEL, GO (x3)

1. If I ____________ to London, I ____________ my aunt. 2. If she ____________ hard, she ____________ her exams. 3. If they ____________ early, ____________ you ____________ them to wait? 4. If he ____________ to the party tonight, ____________he ____________ a friend? 5. If I ____________ enough money, I ____________ that coat! 6. She ____________ angry, if you ____________ that! 7. I ____________ to the doctor tomorrow, if I ____________ worse. 8. If you (not) ____________ your homework, I ____________ your father! 9. ____________ you ____________ the phone if it ____________? 10. If it ____________ tomorrow, we (not) ____________ to the beach.

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3.5.1 First Conditional Lesson Plan

In the BrainPOP ELL movie Styles of Art (L3U5L1) , Ben is trying to paint Moby’s portrait, but first he he has to get Moby to sit still. As he paints, Ben shares his art history book and his knowledge of art history with Moby, and students learn the first conditional and time clauses. In this lesson plan, adaptable for grades 3-8, students practice the first conditional and time clauses as they learn about different styles of art.

Lesson Plan Common Core State Standards Alignments

Students will:.

  • Discuss and illustrate the concept of the word if .
  • Use first conditional sentences to describe an image.
  • Match condition and result clauses from the movie.
  • Listen for missing words to complete conditional or time clause sentences from the movie.
  • BrainPOP ELL
  • Be Careful! Action Image
  • Fishbone Graphic Organizer

Vocabulary:

Preparation:, lesson procedure:.

  • share a similar word in their languages;
  • illustrate the concept of the word if ;
  • make a poster to illustrate the concept;
  • visualize sentences or situations using if , and then describe them;
  • complete a Fishbone Graphic Organizer illustrating different options of a situation;
  • create a metaphor, such as the fishbone, to illustrate the concept of if .
  • Conditions and Results. Distribute or display the condition and result clauses from the movie Styles of Art (L3U5L1) (See Preparation) for a matching activity. It can be done with the whole group on the board or interactive white board, or as a partner activity. Ask the students what they can say about how the first conditional is structured. Alternatively, provide only the first half of the sentences, and ask the students to complete them with either a condition or result.
  • Be Careful! Use the Be Careful! Action Image to practice first conditional sentences. Project for a whole class activity, or make copies for students to work independently. Students can talk or write about potential dangers and hazards in the image. For example: If Moby drops the dishes, they will break. / If Nikki stands on the chair, she will fall.

EXTENSION ACTIVITIES

  • Read If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Joffe Numeroff  with the class to reinforce and practice the first conditional. After reading the book, students can make their own books based on the same pattern.
  • For older students, read aloud Rudyard Kipling’s poem If . The  poem is constructed entirely of if -clauses, and the result isn’t stated until the last line: “….you’ll be a Man, my son!”
  • Chain Story. Begin a group chain story, and have each student add a sentence to continue the story. For example:

If I finish all my homework in school, then I will go to my friend’s house after school. If I go to my friend’s house, then we will play video games. If we play video games, then his mom will get mad …

  • Prepare a listening activity, such as a cloze/gap-fill, with a song that uses the first conditional. Have students fill in the missing words first. Then do the exercise again while they listen to the song. Some examples of songs are:

Time After Time – Cyndi Lauper If you're lost you can look--and you will find me, time after time. If you fall I will catch you--I will be waiting, time after time.

If You Leave Me Now – Chicago or the Bee Gees If you leave me now, you’ll take away the biggest part of me. And if you leave me now, you’ll take away the very heart of me.

Can't Buy Me Love – The Beatles I’ll buy you a diamond ring my friend, if it makes you feel alright. I’ll get you anything my friend, if it makes you feel alright.

If You Don't Know Me By Now – Simply Red If you don't know me by now, you will never, never, never know me.

Natural Mystic – Bob Marley If you listen carefully, now you will hear.

I Won’t Give Up On Us – Jason Mraz I won’t give up on us, even if the skies get rough.

BrainPOP ELL Movies If We Lived There (L3U5L2) Ancient Egypt (L3U5L3) If I Had Three Wishes (L3U5L5)

BrainPOP  Movies Cubism Impressionism Leonardo da Vinci Portraits

BRAINPOP JR  MOVIES Pablo Picasso

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  • English Grammar Exercises for A2 – First conditional

English Grammar Exercises for A2

1. Match the sentences halves.

homework for first conditional

1    If I go to Paris, I’ll bring you back a souvenir.

2   ……………………………………………

3   ……………………………………………

4   ……………………………………………

5   ……………………………………………

6   ……………………………………………

Order not important

2   I’ll lend you some money if you need it.

3   If you’re hot, I’ll open the window.

4   You’ll be late if you don’t hurry.

5   I’ll be amazed if I pass my science exam.

6   If I feel better tomorrow, I’ll go back to school.

2. Complete the first conditional sentences with the verbs in brackets.

1   If you …………………… (eat) too much, you …………………… (feel) unwell.

2   Harry …………………… (not pass) his exams if he …………………… (not study) hard.

3   I …………………… (be) disappointed if you …………………… (not come) to my party.

4   If you …………………… (have) time, …………………… you …………………… (help) me with my homework?

5   They …………………… (not buy) me a new bike if it …………………… (cost) too much.

6   If I …………………… (lend) you £10, when …………………… you …………………… (pay) me back?

7   If you …………………… (give) her a shock, she …………………… (stop) hiccupping.

1 eat, ‘ll feel   2 won’t pass, doesn’t study   3 ‘ll be, don’t come

4 have, will, help   5 won’t buy, costs   6 lend, will, pay

7 give, ‘ll stop

3. Complete the British superstitions. Use the correct form of the verbs in the box.

1   If you …………………… an umbrella indoors, it …………………… bad luck.

2   If you …………………… two magpies, you …………………… lucky.

3   If you …………………… a mirror, you …………………… seven years of bad luck.

4   Something bad …………………… to you if you …………………… under a ladder.

5   You …………………… a male visitor if you …………………… a knife (and a female visitor if it’s a fork).

1 open, ‘ll bring   2 see, ‘ll be   3 break, ‘ll have

4 will happen, walk   5 ‘ll have, drop

4. Look at the pictures and complete the first conditional sentences. Use the phrases in the box.

homework for first conditional

1   If the car doesn’t slow down, …………………… .

homework for first conditional

2   If he reaches for the jar, …………………… .

homework for first conditional

3   If the cat comes down from the tree, …………………… .

homework for first conditional

4    If he doesn’t turn off the taps, …………………… .

1 it’ll crash   2 he’ll fall off the ladder

3 the dog will chase it   4 the bath will overflow

Complete the first conditional sentences with your own ideas.

1   If it rains all weekend, ………………………………………… .

2   I’ll pass all my exams ………………………………………… .

3   If I feel ill tomorrow morning, ………………………………………… .

4   I’ll go to bed early ………………………………………… .

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  1. First Conditional Activities, Games, Lesson Plans & Worksheets

    #2: Dicto Gloss Activity This is a challenging listening activity for higher-level students. Find or write a passage with a few first conditional statements. Then, put students into pairs and read it out at a faster than usual pace. Students have to take notes and try to recreate what they just heard.

  2. First Conditional

    Exercises Complete the first conditional sentences. If I (bump) into Claire, I (tell) her you said hello. People (be) happy if there (be) enough food and drink. We (call) you if your parcel (arrive) today. They (come) if she (send) them a hand-written invitation. If Tom (have) enough money left over, he (book) a holiday.

  3. 90 Conditional 1 (first conditional) English ESL worksheets…

    mewi Count On Me song - First Conditional I made this worksheet to teach and review First Conditional sentences. It includes lots of visual aids to help students understand vocabulary and there's also a brief Gra... 17546 uses sylviepieddaignel first conditional practice

  4. First Conditional Exercise 1

    Do you want to practice your English grammar skills and learn how to use the first conditional? This webpage provides you with an interactive exercise where you have to fill in the blanks with the correct verb forms. You can also check your answers and get explanations. The first conditional is used to talk about possible situations and their consequences in the present or future. If you visit ...

  5. First Conditional: Examples, Sentences, Exercises

    Compare these two sentences: If you go out in the rain, you will get wet. (100% certain) If you apply for that university, you might/could be accepted. (not 100% certain) Use can in the result of first conditional sentences to give permission / prohibition: If you finish your homework, you can watch TV for an hour.

  6. How To Teach The First Conditional

    Start by writing an example sentence on the board. For example, "If I do my homework, the teacher will be happy.". Explain to students that first conditional sentences like this are used to talk about future things that could easily come true. Step 2: Breakdown The First Conditional Structure

  7. First Conditional

    button below! Grammar Discussion Practice First Conditional 16 Question strips Pair Work activity. These questions, adapted from the above pair work discussion, can be used with students seated in pairs or in small groups, or with students standing. Activity Notes on Page 2 Level: Elementary to Pre-Intermediate (CEFR A2)

  8. First Conditional ESL Games Worksheets Activities

    In this free first conditional worksheet, students practice giving advice using the first conditional with will and other modal verbs. Students start by completing first conditional sentences about giving advice with words from a box.

  9. The First Conditional

    The first conditional has the present simple after 'if', then the future simple in the other clause: if + present simple, ... will + infinitive It's used to talk about things which might happen in the future. Of course, we can't know what will happen in the future, but this describes possible things, which could easily come true.

  10. Conditionals: zero, first and second

    Grammar B1-B2 grammar Conditionals: zero, first and second Conditionals: zero, first and second Do you know how to use the zero, first and second conditionals? Test what you know with interactive exercises and read the explanation to help you. Look at these examples to see how zero, first and second conditionals are used.

  11. First Conditional

    The first conditional is used to express a real or very probable situation in the present or future. It is for things that will possibly happen in the future if a condition is met. In a way, we are predicting a likely result in the future if a certain condition happens.

  12. The First Conditional: A Complete Grammar Guide • 7ESL

    To construct the main clause, you would write subject + will + verb. First Conditional Form: If + Simple Present, Subject + will/won't + Verb. You can reverse the order of the clauses. If the "if" clause comes first, a comma is usually used.

  13. 335 First conditional English ESL worksheets pdf & doc

    334 First conditional English ESL worksheets pdf & doc. Most popular. All-time. It's a worksheet to. A selection of English ESL first conditional printables.

  14. PDF NAME: DATE: GRAMMAR WORKSHEET FIRST CONDITIONAL

    First Conditional Level Intermediate ANSWER KEY Answers will vary. Below are some possible answers. 1. If we don't arrive on time, our teacher will be angry. 2. I will watch TV if I have time. 3. If he gets up at 5 o'clock, he will be tired. 4. We will be hungry if we don't eat. 5. If the phone rings, I will answer it.

  15. Conditional: worksheets, printable exercises pdf, handouts

    First conditional - worksheet First conditional - pdf exercises IF Clauses - Type 1 IF-clauses - conditional 1 First conditional - worksheets --------------------------------- Second conditional - worksheet IF Clauses - Type 2 Second conditional - worksheets First and second conditional Worksheet - second conditional

  16. First Conditional IF Exercise

    Mixed Conditional Exercise. Supply the suitable forms of the verbs in brackets. 1. If you (finish) your homework, you can go out. 2. If David (get) a good grade from his English presentation, I will take him to the movie theater. 3. If there (be) traffic, we will use the subway. 4.

  17. First conditional worksheet

    ID: 44705 12/03/2019 Country code: ES Country: Spain School subject: English as a Second Language (ESL) (1061958) Main content: First conditional (2012988) Simple explanation and exercise to introduce the first conditional. Sentence 18 IS negative. I'll change it a.s.a.p. Other contents: conditionals, conditional sentences Loading ad...

  18. Homework: First Conditional

    Homework: First Conditional If you go to bed late, you'll be tired tomorrow... You will feel better if you eat well... Pre-intermediate Just when students have mastered the basic English tenses, along come Conditionals! And with so many of them to master, they can be a stumbling block for many learners.

  19. First Conditional Questions

    There are two structures for creating first conditional sentences and questions. These are: If + Condition, + Result. Result + If + Condition. The condition is stated in the present simple tense and expresses something that may or may not happen. For example, " If class is canceled …".

  20. First Conditional Worksheet

    Preparation. Make enough copies of the worksheet for the number of students in your class. What do I do? Hand out the worksheet. Students complete the sentences by choosing verbs from the list and putting them in the correct form. STUDY, COME, RING, BRING, BUY, ARRIVE, BE, TELL, PASS, RAIN, DO (x2), ANSWER, VISIT, FEEL, GO (x3) 1.

  21. 321 Learn English.com: Grammar: First Conditional (Level: A2)

    Grammar: First Conditional (Level: A2) ESL lesson: structure and use of the first conditional (conditional type 1) for beginners. CEFR level A2. Examples, exercises and ready-to-print-PDF to download. The first conditional (also called conditional type 1) is a structure used for talking about possibilities in the present or in the future.

  22. First Conditional Lesson Plan

    3.5.1 First Conditional Lesson Plan. Grade Levels: 3-5, 6-8. In the BrainPOP ELL movie Styles of Art (L3U5L1), Ben is trying to paint Moby's portrait, but first he he has to get Moby to sit still. As he paints, Ben shares his art history book and his knowledge of art history with Moby, and students learn the first conditional and time clauses.

  23. English Grammar Exercises for A2

    Complete the first conditional sentences with the verbs in brackets. 1 If you …………………… (eat) too much, you …………………… (feel) unwell. 2 Harry …………………… (not pass) his exams if he …………………… (not study) hard. 3 I …………………… (be) disappointed if you …………………… (not come) to my party.

  24. Governor Hochul Announces Cannabis Control Board Approves More Than 100

    Governor Kathy Hochul today announced that the New York State Cannabis Control Board voted to approve the first non-conditional adult-use cannabis licenses for entrepreneurs who applied during the 2023 application window which opened on October 4. In total the CCB issued 109 licenses, with 38 going to applicants seeking to open a retail ...