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Blizard Institute Work Experience Programme (BIWEP)

The Blizard Institute Work Experience Programme welcomes year 10-12 students who are interested in studying Medicine or a Biomedical related degree at university or are considering a career in a similar field.

Neuron Pod illuminated outside the Blizard building at night

Our week-long programme will provide students with the exciting opportunity to gain experience in a laboratory setting and learn more about the medical research here at the Blizard Institute.

What will I be doing?

You will mainly be shadowing our PhD students and postdoctoral researchers in the centres of Cell Biology and Cutaneous Research , Genomics and Child Health , Immunobiology , Neuroscience, Surgery and Trauma , and in the Core Laboratory Facilities as per the general schedule below:

Please note that the schedule could be modified by Centre Managers at any time depending on their staff activity.

Students will be included in one of the Centre of the Cell  shows or workshops booked by schools if there are any arranged during the week. Centre of the Cell is our public engagement centre for informal science-learning.

There may be some seminars, lectures or meetings scheduled for the week and students will be encouraged to attend if allowed.

Who can participate?

  • Students in years 10-12 residing in London, United Kingdom.
  • We prioritise London-based schools and students from the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, where we are based.
  • A limit of two students will be able to take part in the week-long programme scheduled to run on the fourth week of each month (excluding August and December).

How to apply?

Please note that submitting an application does not automatically guarantee you a place. Students are allocated on a first come, first served basis after considering the content of applications. Priority will be given to students who attend schools based in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets.

If you are a student

If you wish to participate in our programme, please email your CV and a completed  Blizard Institute Work Experience Programme Form [PDF 219KB]  (including your expression of interest in the personal statement section) to [email protected] , copying in your work experience representative at your school to ensure they are aware of your enquiry. Your application will only be considered if your school representative is included in your email.

If you are an agency

If you are an education agency in London wishing to secure work placements for schools, please send your requests to  [email protected] .

If you are a parent or tutor

Please note that we correspond directly with the students, school representatives and agency staff only.

  • Useful Resources
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Useful Resources

  • Blizard Institute Health and Safety Guidance 2021 [PDF 372KB]
  • Blizard Institute Induction Form [PDF 494KB]
  • Blizard Institute Work Experience Form [PDF 135KB]
  • Blizard Institute Work Experience Programme Schedule [PDF 94KB]

The Blizard Institute is part of the  Whitechapel campus  of Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry.

  •   How to find us  
  •  Download the  Whitechapel campus map

Contact address

Blizard Institute Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary University of London 4 Newark St London E1 2AT

  • "I have gone beyond what I expected to learn. I got to do lots of practical work and learnt so much about the different Centres. I have  developed lost of practical skills such as preparing samples, using pipettes for accurate measuring and lab safety skillls. All staff were extremely nice and made sure I was looked after and enjoying the activities. I have been exposed to careers I didn't even know existed before and to further education options I hadn't considered before. I definetely would recomend this programme because I learnt so much and got to see and do things I would have never imagined. I found this week very useful as it has allowed me to clearly understand what occupation I would like to undertake in the future. I have learnt the importance of team work and communication skills. I have also gained an insight into this field of work and my confidence in working in the field of science has immensely grown." - Woodmansterne School Student
  • "I actually witnessed real scientists making discoveries for their project. I am so happy and pleased that I got this opportunity. My patience has developed massively: thanks to this programme I have experienced that it is much more effective to take time to complete work so that the outcome is just as imagined. Staff are incredibly kind and hardworking. I much appreciate how they took time from their busy schedules to help us students, they definetely deserve more recognition. BIWEP is a great way for young people to find interest in science, and to help get an idea of what they want to do in future, even if unsure when they start." - Holy Family Catholic School Student
  • "I got a vivid insight into the different fields of research. This allowed me to expand my knowledge and solidify my choice of career. Interacting with staff members was great. They were very friendly and informative. I would recommend this programme to students my age as it helps us understand that there are multiple careers in the science field each with significant levels of importance and prestige." - The Petchey Academy Student
  • "I was not only able to obserb in the lab but participated in an impactful way. I am now aware of the multitude of roles neccesary to make all function and find the area of clinical research more appealing. I found it very pleasant as staff was more than happy to help explain any concepts or topics that I found remotely vague or confusing." - Woodhouse College Student  
  • "I was so lucky to have the amazing experience of shadowing innovative individuals working at such a prestigious institute. Most notably, the day that I shadowed a doctor at the Royal London hospital was the most exciting and interesting experience of my life and had completely spurred my interest in studying medicine at university. I cannot present my gratitude to you enough for allowing me to have such an amazing experience." - St Thomas More RC School Student
  • "This week was an unforgettable experience and I leant so much. It was fascinating to be able to listen to a neurogastroenterologist's journey from training as a doctor to researching the gut-brain axis. Our discussion threw interesting questions on the various treatment possibilities that would arise from this exciting new field." - St Paul’s Girls’ School Student
  • "I have a much more realistic insight into what a career in my chosen field is like. After the programme I am more interested in doing an intercalated year that is more research-based.Every member of staff was really welcoming, kind and keen to explain and encouring me to ask any questions. It has been an invaluable experience for me." - The Tiffin Girls’ School Student
  • "Thank you for the opportunity presented to me this past week. I would also like to thank you and your colleagues for your warm welcomes and the unforgettable experience you have all given me. I have learnt to be curious and to seize every opportunity that I can." - Bishop Challoner Catholic Federation of Schools Student  
  • "I thoroughly enjoyed my time at the Blizard. I am now confident my future is on the science field. The professionals I met gave me invaluable advice on what is needed for me to achieve this. Thanks for making sure that my week with you was coherent and smooth." - Woolwich Polytechnic School Student
  • "Staff were exceptional and very engaging. The activities proposed were fascinating. I enjoyed a risk assessment worshop and the Centre of the Cell as innovative and fun." - Woolwich Polytechnic School Student
  • "Thank you for the opportunity I had. I am so grateful as I understand the planning this took and staff being very busy. Thank you for the experience I have gained is priceless and I wish that you understand the extent of my gratitude." - Mossbourne Community Academy Student
  • "I really enjoyed speaking to an undergraduate about what doing a science degree at university is like before getting to the stage of working in a lab." - The Henrietta Barnet School Student
  • "Thank you for allowing me to work alongside the most amazing and helpful scientists ever. I have really benefitted from this experience as I would like to become a researcher in the near future." - Dukes Aldridge Academy Student
  • "Thank you for the work experience opportunity at the Blizard Institute. It has been really helpful and I learned a lot from the staff throughout the week" - Bishop Challoner 6th Form Student
  • "It was interesting to be able to see the advanced equipment in use as I would not have accees to it otherwise. I was able to see how theories learnt at school in science lessons are put into practice through research." - Newham Collegiate Sixth Form Student
  • "I am extremely grateful for your help in organising my placement and to all the staff: Jan, Belen, Dr" - St Thomas More RC Comprehensive School Student
  • "Thank you very much for everything, it was truly an amazing and insightful experience. I thoroughly enjoyed doing the whole programme and it has assured me that I definitely want to go into a lab-based career in the future." - Holly Alleyn’s School Student  
  • "Thank you so much for the experience, and I would love to say a massive thank you to all the people that I met on the week and was able to share a part of their day with." - Holly Alleyn’s School Student    
  • "Thank you very much for helping me with everything regarding the week, It was an amazing experience that I will never forget!" - St Benedicts School (Ealing) Student
  • "Playing games in the Centre of the Cell pod was very informative and interactive." - Bishop Challoner Sixth Form (Year 10) Student
  • "I extremely loved being able to widen my knowledge of stem cells through animals (mice)" - Havering Sixth Form College Student
  • "Thank you for making our time more interesting and fun! We really appreciate it. Wish you all the best with your research!" - St Paul's Way Trust School Student
  • "Enjoyed absolutely everything! Thanks for providing such helpful academic and research career advice." - London Design & Engineering UTC Student

Centre of the Cell Work Experience

Centre of the Cell is an informal science education centre located within the Blizard Institute which offers work experience for young people aged between 14 and 19. Our work experience is focused around the skills required for science communication but can also be extremely useful for anyone interested in a healthcare/STEM related career. We currently run two types of work experience - virtual and in-person. There is crossover between the two types, so it is advisable to only take part in one of them.

Both virtual and in-person placements will offer plenty of activities to develop transferable skills. For example, you will be given the chance to interview a medical/dental student and/or a scientist, gaining an insight into their career while developing your communication skills. Another of our popular activities is the chance to design an online science game, developing research and presentation skills.

To find out more about our work experience, email [email protected] .

Please note that our work experience does not include any lab work.

In-person Work Experience

Week long placements during term time. These placements will take place during the school day (10am-3pm) so permission will be required from the school. This placement includes supporting with the delivery of our school events, learning how a science centre runs behind the scenes.

Virtual Work Experience

Our virtual work experience runs during February Half Term and the Summer holidays. This placement is 4 days long, from 10am-3pm . This work experience incorporates a mixture of video calls, and independent work where you will be sent the activity through email. In this work experience you are able to organise your time, helping you to develop independence and time management skills.

Visit the Centre of the Cell website

Queen Mary is the most inclusive university of its kind. Through Access to Queen Mary, we nurture students typically under-represented at Russell Group universities, through an 18-month programme of activities, events and interventions.

The Access to Queen Mary programme aims to help students become more prepared for, and successful in, higher education. Students who successfully complete the programme will not only have benefited from tailored academic and pastoral support but will benefit from a contextual offer to Queen Mary.

Interested in taking part in research? Join our participant register

  • Careers & Study

Studying at SAHMRI

Work experience program, sahmri offers a selective work experience program to introduce secondary school students to the many career options available in the medical research field..

The program aims to give students a practical understanding of careers in medical research and equip them with the knowledge to make more informed decisions around their future careers.

Over a five-day program, students will be exposed to a range of activities across our research themes. You will have the opportunity to learn from world-class researchers and discover what they do at SAHMRI.

Eligibility

Students from Australian secondary schools who are currently undertaking Year 11 or Year 12 are eligible to apply. Year 10 students can also apply however due to the complexity of the content covered in the program, Year 11 and 12 students will generally be given preference.

At least one place in each program will be identified for a student who identifies as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander.

Work experience placements should be arranged as part of your school's recognised work experience program.

Find out more about the 2024 Work Experience Programs

Take a look at the 2021 work experience program highlight reel.

What it's like to study at SAHMRI

Working at SAHMRI

What it's like to work at SAHMRI

Neville Fazulla Aboriginal Health Memorial...

Work experience programs 2024.

SAHMRI is located on Kaurna Country. We pay respects to the Kaurna people of the Adelaide Plains and to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. We are committed to embracing knowledge and culture as we continue our working journey to incorporate Aboriginal health research across all of our themes and further reconciliation.

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MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology

One of the world's leading research institutes, our scientists are working to advance understanding of biological processes at the molecular level - providing the knowledge needed to solve key problems in human health.

Work Experience

medical research work experience year 10

The LMB offers a variety of work experience placements for students in Years 10 to 13 (aged 14 and above). Our placements provide hands-on experience of working in an academic research institute. Placements may be within an LMB  research group ,  scientific facility  or  support services , highlighting the variety of roles that underpin our cutting edge research.

We have partnered with Form the Future to offer in-person placements to underrepresented students at the LMB during the summer. Form the Future, a not-for-profit careers and employment company, was founded in 2015 to help young people find their route through education into employment and provide employers access to their future talent. Committed to each stage of young people’s development, the dedicated team provides schools, colleges and other groups with high-quality outsourced Careers Education, Information, Advice and Guidance (CEIAG) services.

Applications are open for placements for:

  • Year 10 students (from July 8 th – 12 th ). Find the application form here .
  • Year 12 students (from July 29 th to August 2 nd ). Find the application form here .

The application deadline is March 29 th 2024.

Additional placements will be advertised via this webpage when they become available.

If you are an undergraduate student, you may be interested in our  Student Placement Scheme .

For any questions relating to work experience, please email  Public Engagement Team .  

Placement length

Depending which placement you apply for, the advert will tell you how long they run. Advertised work experience placements from the LMB can vary from 1-2 weeks (usually in July and August).

If selected for work experience, you will be expected to attend all days of the placement.

Food and travel expenses

For all students who applied to an advertised work experience placement via Form the Future or via our website we will cover reasonable travel expenses and offer a voucher to cover food and refreshments (approx. £5 a day) throughout their placement. This is given as a voucher which is covered in cost after spending by the LMB.

Quotes from 2023 placements

Siena – hosted by Magda Sutcliffe

medical research work experience year 10

“I really enjoyed the setting. LMB is so welcoming and different to anything I have ever seen. Learning to use the various equipment was great.

I plan on pursuing medicine and so seeing how the lab work can be applied to healthcare was extremely useful. It also provided the possibility of an alternative lab job in the future.”

Tolu – hosted by Magda Sutcliffe

medical research work experience year 10

“I really enjoyed the experience at the LMB. My highlights were going into the lab and doing hands on work instead of just observing. It emphasises the difference between small school labs and real-world labs. 

I want to study pharmacy, and this has solidified my decision as I’ve read an article that shows how molecular biology and pharmacy link and how it affects the medical industry.”

Annabelle – hosted by Millie-Jane Adcock

“The highlights of my time at the LMB were gaining new lab skills such as using pipettes and various robots. 

This experience has sparked an interest in laboratory work and careers in research because I found the work very interesting and enjoyed working in the laboratory environment.”

Summer – hosted by Lori Passmore

medical research work experience year 10

“I really enjoyed having a tour of the building to see all the equipment that gets used and learning how it’s used to aid research. I also really enjoyed the hands-on experience and getting to help conduct real experiments to see how methods are used and build my confidence and skills when doing practical work. 

I felt free to ask questions about university and career paths after that and I received informative, honest answers. I plan on doing a biochemistry degree at university, and this placement confirmed that this is definitely the route I want to take.”

Mariana – hosted by Lori Passmore

medical research work experience year 10

“Throughout this fantastic experience, I aided in a variety of experiments but my favourite has to be the CPF PAS changing an immature mRNA into a mature mRNA. Although the knowledge needed is years away in my academic career my hosts always ensured I understood, breaking down concepts and applying it to facts I learn in my current A-levels.

Originally, I worried about the work life balance in a research lab, but I learnt the lab is a community of people who consistently share knowledge and help each other. I plan to follow a more research focused life plan.”

Rami – hosted by Boglárka Anna Vámos

medical research work experience year 10

“Some of the highlights at the LMB was discovering how researchers used Cryo-electron microscopy to understand Alzheimer’s and even won an award, I found that quite inspiring. I also enjoyed using new tools and equipment for example centrifuges and vortex and learning a new way of pipetting I thought that was really engaging.

My time at the LMB has given me some clarification that I would like to do a health science (biomedicine) as before I wasn’t quite sure as I knew the content that would be taught but wasn’t sure what type of practical things I could be doing. I’ve never had any hands-on experience outside of school, so this was really eye opening and a unique opportunity to have.” 

Raufaeel – hosted by Andy Howe

medical research work experience year 10

“The highlight of my time at the LMB was learning to solder as it was a new skill.

The placement has been useful in helping me make decisions about my future because I was able to receive career advice from experts and it allowed me to understand the potential risks and benefits of each one of my ideas.”

Quotes from 2022 placements

“Working in a research-focused environment was something I found very enjoyable. I liked the emphasis on taking the time to do something right instead of making something commercially for a profit.”

“My time at the LMB was my first hands-on experience in a lab outside of school. During this time, I really enjoyed learning about and seeing what a career in science might look like. I particularly enjoyed learning about and examining  Drosophila melanogaster , as well as learning about how they could be used to aid research and test out theories in the lab. I also thoroughly enjoyed carrying out a bacterial protein expression and learning about the science behind this.”

“My time at the LMB has certainly been very helpful in guiding my decision-making over my future career, as it has given me first-hand insight into what a career in science might entail. I had a great time while I was here, and I plan to pursue a career in this field.”

Ingham Institute

medical research work experience year 10

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medical research work experience year 10

High School Work Experience Program

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Home / Youth Engagement in Active Health (YEAH) / High School Work Experience Program

Our High School Work Experience Program is designed for students in Years 10, 11 and 12 that have displayed a genuine interest and passion for health and medical research. This three-day program is conducted by our dedicated Youth Engagement Coordinator, whereby students get hands-on experience in a working medical research laboratory and learn the introductory skills of a scientist.

Day 1 Students undertake a full tour of the Institute, visiting the multiple research groups throughout the building. They also have the opportunity to tour the Australian MRI-Linac facility for cancer treatment, located in the Institute’s research bunker within South West Sydney’s Cancer Therapy Centre at Liverpool Hospital.

Students complete an induction into the wet laboratory before learning the basic uses of a microscope and a scientific pipette, which is a lab tool commonly used in all experiments across chemistry, biology and medicine. Along with simple calculations and measurements, these skills are applied when they get to prepare and analyse their own cheek cells!

Day 2 The skills learnt on Day 1 are put to use where students get to extract DNA from bacterial cells, cut it up into different sizes and analyse the DNA pieces on a gel using ultraviolet. This experiment is commonly used by researchers in the field of molecular biology, especially when manipulating DNA for cloning. Students also learn simple microbiological techniques of growing bacteria in nutrient cultures and on bacteriological media plates.

Day 3 The final day of the program involves protein extractions from kidney and liver tissues where students use their newly taught skills to measure and calculate an unknown test sample. All students receive a certificate at the end of the program as recognition of completing their work experience at the Ingham Institute.

Experience Highlights

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Call us on:  08 7130 3970

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Medical Work Experience for Year 10 and 11 Students

ORGANISED VOLUNTEER OVERSEAS PROJECTS THAT PREPARE YOU FOR A MEDICAL DEGREE IN AUSTRALIA

We understand that getting medical work experience as a student can be extremely difficult. We offer young people from secondary and senior secondary school a safe, guided experience into the world of medicine through our High School Special Projects. 

Our medical internships abroad for high school students focus on experiential education, so you learn by doing. You can expect to:   

  • Shadow doctors and other medical professionals in busy hospitals and clinics
  • Attend medical workshops and seminars
  • Get first-hand insight into the healthcare challenges people face everyday
  • Participate in community healthcare outreaches that serve people in need
  • Learn essential medical skills like measuring blood pressure and blood sugar levels

You’ll be part of an ethical medical project that benefits local communities. Furthermore, you’ll actively demonstrate your commitment to healthcare and helping people, which will help your university application stand out from the crowd!

“As soon as I turned 16 I started looking for work experience that would help me with my application [for a medical degree]. Projects Abroad came up with an amazing choice of fantastic countries that ran a two week special programme for Medicine, perfect!” - Medicine High School Special in Tanzania by Elena L

At what age can you do work experience in a hospital?

Our opportunities for getting work experience in a hospital as a volunteer are open to people between the ages of 15-18. They are especially suited to students in Year 10 and 11.   

High School Specials are designed specifically for young people by our qualified staff, and all activities are age-appropriate and safe. In addition, we ask all students to follow our code of conduct for medical volunteering. This policy helps us ensure that our projects are ethical, and that we really help the local people we work with. 

Interested in learning more about our High School Special Projects’ work? Read our blog that tells you all you need to know about medical work experience programmes for young Australians in Year 10 or 11 .   

High School Medical Internships: What can I do?

For young students interested in getting medical work experience overseas, we have two kinds of volunteer opportunities:

  • Medicine High School Specials
  • Public Health High School Specials

Medicine High School Specials mainly focus on clinical experience. Here are the project highlights:

  • Observe doctors in different hospital departments, like General Medicine or Paediatrics
  • The departments you work with vary between destinations. For example, in Nepal , you can spend time in departments like oncology, and sit in on lectures with local medical students. In Tanzania , you may view surgery!
  • As many of you already know, treatment is just one of many aspects involved in healthcare. So you also focus on preventative care through outreach and education. This element is not only deeply rewarding, but crucial to providing communities with effective healthcare

This project is ideal for young people in Year 10 or 11 looking to get medical work experience and pursue careers as doctors and nurses. It may also help inform your decision that a medical career is right for you!

Public Health

During Public Health High School Specials, most of your time will be spent out in the field. Here are the project highlights:

  • Help medical professionals provide healthcare services through community outreaches, in countries like Cambodia and Mexico
  • Assist with education, and help spread awareness around relevant topics. For example, you may educate communities about nutrition in an effort to prevent diabetes
  • Have opportunities to practice healthcare in a clinical setting. We offer this to better inform your approach to preventative care  

Public Health Projects are a great option for people interested in Healthcare, Advocacy, International Studies, and Social Sciences.

“The most exciting part for me was to be able to go into the surgery room and see a C-section and a hip replacement. I feel that being able to see these surgeries gave me experience that will be very useful when I pursue a career in medicine.” -  Public Health High School Special in Mexico by Erica S

Our friendly Project Experts would be happy to discuss these options in order to determine the programme that best meets your needs and goals. Please reach out by email or phone to speak with a representative today!

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Most of our staff have been volunteers themselves, so they’re well placed to answer your questions, big or small.

to start planning your project

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Year 10 Work Experience

Work experience in 2024.

Monday 24 - Friday 28 June. (the last week of Term 2).

Program Structure

The University of Melbourne Year 10 Work Experience Program provides students with a sample of activities that are part of a career in STEM including conducting experiments, attending seminars, collaborating with others on research projects, and presenting their own findings.

Participants discover what it is like to be a scientist, meet like-minded friends and scientific role models, and also get a taste of university life.

The program is divided into a number of science discipline streams. Students must nominate their top three preferences as part of the application process. During the week, students will be hosted by academics working in their chosen discipline, and also spend some time interacting with students from other groups.

2023 Y10 Work Experience

2024 Program streams

The School of Agriculture, Food and Ecosystem Sciences (SAFES) brings together a variety of discipline strengths and innovative solutions in ecosystem processes and management, food industries and systems, and agricultural practices and industry. This work experience opportunity covers an exciting mix of research covering topics that address a wide range of issues including climate change, food security, biodiversity conservation, sustainable forest management, invasive species, and environmentally and economically sustainable agricultural practices. Opportunities are available at the Parkville campus, as well as the schools’ other campus’ including Burnley, home of the urban horticulture and greening, Creswick, forests and fire, and Dookie, agriculture and land management across the themes of Agriculture, Food and Ecosystems. If you are keen on the environment, agriculture, and learning how research is making a difference to the ecosystems around us, then this could be the experience for you!

Research in the School of BioSciences is diverse and exciting. We use fundamental principles in ecology, evolution and genetics to understand how life on earth works, and to solve some of the most complex challenges humanity is facing. There is a broad range of techniques and questions that you’ll be able to learn about, such as how we can use evolution to control of invasive species, how ecology can be used by fisheries, the development of bioinspired materials to improve technologies and how animals can rapidly adapt to climate change. During your visit you will be able to interact with top researchers in these fields and be part of the process of doing science!

Chemistry is the study of matter – the structure, properties, and behaviour of everything that takes up space in the universe! If you choose to work in the School of Chemistry, you could be working in a lab investigating functional materials, biological chemistry or chemical biology, sustainability and the environment, and fundamental chemistry! Let us know which one you would be most interested in, and why!

How did humans build sustainable and innovative communities that spread worldwide? Engineering includes the study of the natural environment, transport, machines, buildings, and even humans. It strives to improve the structures that society is established on in ways that benefit both humans and the planet.

People, Rocks, Fossils, Landscapes, Climate and Weather! We study Earth’s physical and chemical properties, fossils and the origins and history of life, the environmental and human effects of natural disasters, the distributions of minerals and resources needed to sustain our future planet, the dynamism of Indigenous cultures and landscapes, the drivers and trajectories of climate change, and the dynamics of human behaviour. This program will cover diverse topics, from earthquakes and volcanoes, to climate change, to engineering geology, to the diversity of human behaviours and cultures!

IT is a rapidly moving field that explores the way we manage and store data. The flow of information across the world has become crucial for businesses, governments, and individuals. It is expanding human society to an entirely different platform, as more of our world goes online.

Originally, mathematicians engaged in pure mathematics – mathematics for its own sake, without having any application in mind. Today, however, almost all practical applications begin with mathematical foundations. Regarded as the root of all sciences, mathematics and statistics is essential to industry and research across many sectors such as healthcare, education, finance, energy, and supply chain. Mathematics and statistics also underpin the growing field of data science; they form the foundations for areas such as modelling, big data, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. We need mathematicians and statisticians, now more than ever, to tackle serious problems faced around the globe, concerning all facets of life at the microscale (e.g. bioinformatics) and macroscale (e.g. climate change).

Physics involves the study of everything in physical existence, from the smallest subatomic particles to the entire universe. If you choose to do work experience in Physics, you could work alongside astrophysicists investigating dark matter and new galaxies, or work in a lab developing methods to enable nanoscale imaging of biology and analysis of the inner composition of an atom.

Science Gallery Melbourne (SGM) is a new space where science, art and technology collide, and young people are able to explore ideas and issues important to them. Part gallery, part museum and part experiment, Science Gallery exhibitions are developed with and for young people. Exhibition themes cut across STEM disciplines, and range from mental wellbeing, to swarming robotics, to dark matter. During your work experience, you will work with curators, learning programmers, exhibition designers and builders, and our in-house science communicators, Mediators, to gain insight into a variety of careers and learn how this transdisciplinary team works together to co-create future-focused exhibitions. It’s going to be a whole lot of fun!

Frequently Asked Questions

All Year 10 Students currently studying in Australia (including homeschooled students) who will be 15 at the start of the program may apply.

The Year 10 Work Experience Program will run for 5 full-days including at least 4 days of hands-on STEM work experience.

There is a huge range of activities students may undertake during their work experience including shadowing a STEM professional, conducting experiments/research, attending workshops/lectures/tutorials, and attending site visits. Students will also research a topic/question throughout the week and present their findings in a poster expo on the final day.

The program is free to attend and all students will be paid at the Victorian Government standard rate of $5/day. While the program is free, students may apply for financial assistance to attend the program (e.g accommodation or travel costs) through the application form.

All students will be notified of their application outcome by mid-late March.

If you missed a question/answer or input the wrong information, please resubmit a NEW application and we will use the most recent application under your name.

Unfortunately, the Year 10 Work Experience Program only occurs once per year, and students must attend the dates outlined above.

How to apply for the 2024 program

Applications are now OPEN .

Applications for the 2024 program will remain open until March 4th.

Financial assistance is available to attend the program and will be assessed on a case-by-case basis. To be assessed, applicants must complete the appropriate section on their application. For all other enquiries please send an email to [email protected] .

Click here for information about vaccination requirements for visitors to the university.

2023 Highlights

2023 Y10 Students at the Dookie Vineyard

Other events you might be interested in

Are you interested in studying at the University of Melbourne? Hear directly from our staff and students at one of our many in-person and online events, or find out more about events we could run in your school

Events for future students Science in schools

A group of prospective students gathered around a bench, watching a demonstrator using a pipette to drip a liquid into some beakers

How to Get Research Experience

New section.

Working in a research setting can help make you a competitive medical school applicant and help you to determine if a career in medicine or medical research is right for you

male student working in chemistry lab

How do I find a research position?

If you’re currently in college, check with your institution’s science or undergraduate research websites for opportunities to assist with faculty research projects. You can also review faculty bio pages and lab websites for more information. Next, reach out to your immediate network: express your interest in assisting with a research project to your science professors, academic advisor, and your pre-health advisor.

Try exchanging ideas with your peers and upper-classmen for advice on research opportunities at your institution. You can also ask peer advisors, resident advisors, or any fellow premedical students for introductions to principal investigators (PIs). You might even try the “Undergrad-Grad-PI” method. This is where you first reach out to undergraduate students in research labs to learn about their responsibilities; they oftentimes are more responsive. Then, reach out to the graduate or post-doc students to learn about the research question being investigated. After this, read the most recent paper or abstract the lab published. Once you complete these steps, you can approach the PI more confidently and more effectively demonstrate your commitment to and understanding of their project.

Your school’s career center or student employment office may know about research job openings, and they can also offer resume help and go over interview tips and techniques. Remember, opportunities may be on or off campus, full- or part-time, paid or unpaid, or part of a summer program. Once you find a position, you can connect with your school’s fellowships or awards office to inquire about research funding opportunities.

If you’ve already graduated, consider looking into open positions. Research hospitals, universities, and biotech companies are always looking for lab technicians or clinical research coordinators (CRC). Job opportunities are typically posted on the career pages of their websites.

When should I begin gaining research experience in college?

Some premedical students begin their research experiences during their first year of college, and others begin research positions after they have already graduated. On average, most students secure a research position junior or senior year. There are three big factors that will impact this:

  • Your level of interest in pursuing research. If you are really excited to investigate a question under a mentor, you might find yourself reaching out to professors early and often. Other students may focus on gaining clinical experience, and therefore wait later in their academic career to start research.
  • Readiness for the research project. Different PIs will have different expectations for preparation. A research project might require you to first take coursework in basic lab sciences, statistics, or another advanced topic specific to the project. Other PIs may prefer to train you “on-the-job” through their graduate or post-doc students. This will impact when you are ready to join a project.
  • Finding the right research project. There is a process of reviewing different PIs and research projects to find the right fit for you. What subject do you want to investigate? Do you want your research project to take place in a lab or non-lab setting? Is there an independent question you want to investigate with the help of a mentor?

When is the best time to look for a position?

According to Kate Stutz, Ph.D., Director of Pre-Health Advising at Brandeis University, if you’re interested a research position during the academic year, the best time to look for positions is at the very beginning of the semester. There also tend to be a lot of research opportunities in the summer, both paid and volunteer, through set programs like the National Science Foundation’s Research Experience for Undergraduates (REUs). It’s best to start applying for summer research positions in December-February for the upcoming summer. Remember, typically there are more applicants than available spots so get your applications in early. Each undergraduate institution will be different, therefore make sure to connect with your advisors and peers for feedback on when to start looking.

What’s the best way to apply?

The outreach email message that you send to potential research faculty is very important. This message should include a formal introduction of yourself, evidence that you are familiar with their research project(s), and a clear, specific ask. Identify what you hope to contribute to the project. Do you want to clean the glassware or analyze lab findings? Consider attaching your resume as well. Dr. Stutz stresses that networking and persistence are crucial to finding a position. Make sure you’re using all of your network, including your peers and professors, to find open positions. Don’t be afraid to send follow up emails; faculty are very busy and often overlook emails. Sometimes, it can be even more effective to stop by a professor’s office hours to hand deliver your materials and indicate your interest in person.

How should I prepare for an interview?

With any interview, it’s important to make a good impression. Be sure to dress appropriately. Come prepared with a resume. Use your campus career center for advice on proper attire and resume best practices.

Often during interviews, you’ll be asked about your career goals. It’s helpful to be able to speak about the steps you plan to take to meet those goals. Talk about classes you’ve taken, especially upper-level science courses. Speak about your skills, your knowledge of techniques, and the equipment you’ve used throughout your coursework. Be prepared to discuss the lab experiments you’ve completed. If you’ve done any sort of research—even in your coursework—keep track of it. This shows you have experience. Lastly, interviewers often ask candidates if they have any questions. Dr. Stutz suggests asking something that indicates you’ve done your own research into their project. You could ask where they see their research going in the next three years or what challenges they anticipate. You could also ask about expectations for undergraduate researchers; do they expect you to work 20+ hours a week? Full time over the summer? Do they require you to have work study or to sign up for research credits? Asking these questions ahead of time can help you plan ahead and determine if this position is the best fit for you. Check out these  interview resources  for more tips.

Does research experience have to be in a wet lab?

No! Research can be performed in any field or subject. We’ve had successful applicants with research in classics, sociology, history, and policy, as well as applicants with research in biology, biochemistry, and neuroscience. Medical schools value all types of research. Research can take place in a scientific lab that requires advanced devices and procedures to obtain data for analysis. Research can also take place in the humanities or social sciences where participant interviews or surveys are needed to obtain an individual's life perspective. The clinical research field is constantly investigating patient outcomes and how to improve care through clinical trials or analysis of patient data. As a premedical student, consider what question you want to investigate further. Do you want to learn more about how health inequities impact disadvantaged communities in your area, or perhaps you want to know more about the protein channels involved in memory cognition? Once you choose a direction, you can then partner with a research PI for guidance on how to navigate your question. Sierra Perez, Pre-Health Advisor at Brandeis University, shares not to be afraid to get creative with your research question. She has been impressed by the medical school applicants who have created independent questions that address the community needs. “Applicants are recognizing the critical needs of specific populations, such as homelessness, LGBTQ+, veterans, youth with disabilities, etc.,” she stated. “There is also a demand for translational researchers, or individuals who can take complicated bench topics and apply it to the clinical world.”

Is research experience required to be accepted to medical school? 

It depends. Some medical schools are very research focused; they may require a research thesis or have research time built into the curriculum. Other schools are more community or clinically focused; they would rather have an applicant work in a healthcare setting or volunteer at their local soup kitchen than be at the bench moving clear liquids from one test tube to another. Research experience (in whatever discipline) is helpful for developing some of the AAMC Core Competencies , such as critical thinking, quantitative reasoning, scientific reasoning, as well as teamwork and oral communication skills. How much you should engage in research depends on how much you enjoy it once you try it!

The majority of accepted medical school applicants have some form of academic or clinical research at the time they apply. Competence in research has become increasingly important in the medical field to improve patient care outcomes.

You can also review medical school mission statements to see if research is a focus at a particular school. You can read each school’s mission, and the number of accepted students in their most recent class who had research experience, in the  Medical School Admission Requirements . Remember, it’s best to pursue experiences that you’re genuinely interested in, rather than just to check a box, but you may not know if research is for you until you give it a try.  

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Work experience

WEHI welcomes school students aged 15 years and over for work experience placements.

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Under wehi’s secondary school work experience program, students will have a unique opportunity to learn about careers in medical research by participating in a five-day program of research activities with our scientific teams., secondary school work experience program.

The program will give students direct experience working in medical research. As well as hands-on experience in the lab, the program also includes group workshops devoted to laboratory skills and safety, research ethics and science communication.

Up to 24 students will be selected for each of two week-long intakes (19–23 June and 11–15 September). The program is capped at 24 students for each intake to maximise access to key lab equipment and deliver a quality learning experience.

The program will take place at the WEHI Parkville campus .

Students will be expected to attend the entire program, approximately 9am – 4pm daily. All students will need to arrange their own transport to Parkville each day, as well as any necessary accommodation. Students will be paid $10 per day as part of the program.

  • Applications open: Wednesday 1 February 2023.
  • Applications close: 5pm Wednesday 15 March 2023
  • Successful student applicants notified: Early April 2023
  • 19–23 June 2023
  • 11–15 September 2023

Eligibility

The WEHI Secondary School Work Experience Program accepts students in year 10, who are aged 15 years or over on the first day of the program.

WEHI aims to provide educational opportunities to a range of students. We welcome applications from students with diverse backgrounds and life experiences.

Applications for the 2023 program are now closed (as of Wednesday 15 March 2023).

Applicants will be notified of whether they are successful in early April 2023.

Please sign up for our secondary school mailing list to be contacted about our future work experience program opportunities.

Other work experience opportunities at WEHI

We understand that for various reasons, not all year 10 students are able to apply for the Secondary School Work Experience Program.

School students who are not able to apply for the Secondary School Work Experience Program may directly contact WEHI laboratory heads or heads of our Professional Services teams about undertaking work experience at a mutually convenient time.

Please note that positions for work experience placements at other times of the year are very limited, and not all teams can accept students.

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Faculty of Health work experience

A taster of life as a medical, dental, biomedical or healthcare science student at the university of plymouth.

Medicine and dentistry work experience

If you’re a student in Year 10 or above, studying in the South West (Cornwall, including the Isles of Scilly, Devon, Dorset, and Somerset) and are thinking about studying a medical, dental, or biomedical sciences course at university, our work experience programme allows you a taster of just what life as a student is like here at the Faculty of Health .

The application process for work experience is open from September 2023. 

Visiting students will be able to take part in both practical hands on workshops as well as project work, workshops, mock interviews and presentations. In previous years students have been offered the below activities:

  • application and interview presentations
  • introduction to Simulated Dental Learning Environment (SDLE). Clinical sessions involving the creation of alginate impressions, fillings and rubber dams
  • enquiry based learning (EBL) workshops including presentation preparation
  • mock interviews
  • staff presentations 
  • campus tour and quiz
  • project work
  • question and answer sessions.

Where and when?

The work experience programme for dentistry usually takes place on the main University of Plymouth campus. With sessions running for four days (weekdays), 10:00am until 3:00pm.

Take a virtual tour of our campus

We advise that you apply as soon as possible as spaces are limited.

"The practical activities were extremely interesting, they were a good insight into what you would do as a dental professional. I feel I have gained a greater insight into dentistry and life as a dental student. The information given was quite different to a typical webinar, and I think I have a greater understanding of the roles that dentists play."

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Biomedical science

Visiting students will be able to take part in both practical hands on workshops as well as tours, group work and presentations. In previous years students have been offered the below activities:

  • application and interview guidance
  • group work projects and presentations
  • measuring energy expenditure using open circuit spirometry workshop
  • Clinical Physiology: cold face immersion and ECG workshop
  • peak flow, heart rate variability, and finger blood flow plethysmography application workshop
  • lab work on microscopy of blood films 
  • nutrition lab workshop.

The work experience programme for biomedical science usually takes place on the main University of Plymouth campus. Some sessions may take place at our Derriford campus but transportation is included in the programme. Sessions run for three days (weekdays), 10:00am until 4:00pm.

We advise that you apply as possible as spaces are limited.

" I really enjoyed the programme and the different lecturers who came to talk were very interesting and interactive with students. After the virtual work experience I would say that I am thinking of having a career in Biomedical Sciences. That is because of the way the virtual experience was run by the different lecturers making you feel that you are going to gain a lot by doing a biomedical science degree at university."

Medicine dentistry health work experience

Visiting students will be able to take part in both practical hands on workshops as well as talks, mock interviews and group discussions. In previous years students have been offered the below activities:

  • introduction to problem based learning (PBL)
  • anatomy sessions using the 3D virtual dissection anatomage table.
  • admissions talks
  • cranial nerves examination: demonstration on how to examine each one systematically
  • overview of Clinical Skills Resource Centre (CSRC): Venepuncture, blood glucose measurements, pregnant abdomen, airways management (intubation), basic life support and blood pressure taking
  • demonstration of the A-E assessments of patients, and management of in-hospital emergencies. Simsuite practice, applying A-E assessment knowledge as an in-hospital team
  • mock MMI interviews.

The work experience programme for medicine is usually split between the main University of Plymouth campus and John Bull Building at Derriford. Work experience sessions usually run from Monday – Friday, 10:00am until 3:00pm.

"Thank you so much, before this Daisy had mentioned being a doctor, but her confidence got in the way and she thought she couldn’t do it! After a week with you guys she is now very enthusiastic about being a doctor and I have noticed a difference in her overall confidence. The Student Ambassadors and the interviews gave her an insight into the kinds of questions she may be asked, so all weekend she has been planning answers! Please pass on my thanks to the amazing Student Ambassadors for instilling so much confidence and self-belief into Daisy”

Medicine dentistry work experience

I doubted I would get in to medical school, but a taster week gave me confidence.

Medical student Chris Gummow on his elective at Rarotonga Hospital in the Cook Islands

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Discover your career with us

Want to start your career at the cutting-edge of medical innovation? To unleash creative ideas that stand out in a global market leader? And work with some of the brightest minds in the industry who will push you to be your best? All while building the personal and professional skills you need to lead our exciting, dynamic evolution? Join us and impact millions of lives, together.

Early Talent programmes

Read about and apply to our programmes using the links below.

Business Apprenticeships UK

Locations: Cambridge and Macclesfield, UK

Our business teams support the research and development of life-changing medicines for our patients every step of the way and help turn our most ambitious goals into reality. Functions such as Finance, Human Resources, Project Management and Supply Chain play a part in supporting our people and our processes. So, whether you have a passion you want to pursue or are still figuring it out, there’s endless opportunity to experience new things and learn from different areas of the business to discover what truly inspires and motivates you.

Digital, Technology Solutions, and Data Apprenticeships UK

In the AstraZeneca Information Technology (IT) organisation, we are passionate about driving technological innovation, continuously improving our IT environment to ensure our internal teams can do their best work and successfully deliver our business goals. Here, you’ll work with world-renowned talent and leaders on real projects to gain hands-on experience whilst also working towards your qualification.

Operations Apprenticeships UK

Locations: Macclesfield and Speke UK

Global Operations at AstraZeneca facilitates innovation and connection between our science laboratories and our patients. We provide a vital platform for our business to play a key role in the development, manufacturing, testing and delivery of our medicines across the globe. Here, you’ll learn and earn in a supportive team, guided by expert managers, mentors and buddies who will help you develop the skills you seek, while pushing and encouraging you to get the most out of your time with us.

Scientific Apprenticeships UK

We are a scientifically led business and our purpose is all about pushing the boundaries of what science can do. Our science apprenticeships involve working in our laboratories and being part of our journey to provide life changing medicines to patients all over the world – transforming lives for the better.

Work Experience UK

AstraZeneca will be hosting virtual work experience opportunities for Year 10 students in the UK over several weeks during June/July. The week long experience will showcase the development of a medicine, including the different functions involved and the early careers entry points into these roles.

Internships (UK)

AstraZeneca is a place where we all help and empower each other. Our supervisors are committed to providing you with all the guidance and support you need to build your skills, confidence and capabilities. Our internships are for those who want to gain an insight into a particular sector or role within our global organisation. Varying in length and aim, our internships are the perfect opportunity to set yourself up for a successful career.

Leaders in Finance Tomorrow (US)

The Leaders in Finance Tomorrow (LIFT) is an AstraZeneca US internship program that provides the best and the brightest students with a unique opportunity to gain meaningful finance and accounting experience within our industry-leading business. As a young professional, you’ll be treated as such – given all the trust and empowerment you need to take on new challenges, but with all the help and guidance you need to succeed.

Pharmaceutical Technology & Development Undergraduate Industrial Placement Studentship (UK)

Our Pharmaceutical Technology & Development Undergraduate Industrial Placement Studentship (PT&D UIPS) introduces you to the world of ground-breaking drug development, placing you in highly dedicated teams committed to delivering impactful new medicines to patients. Here, you’ll gain an insight into what it’s like to work in a big biopharma, with exposure to people who truly care about your personal career development.

Research & Development Undergraduate Industrial Placement Studentship (UK & Sweden)

The Research & Development Undergraduate Industrial Placement Studentship (R&D UIPS) introduces undergrads to the world of drug discovery, embedding students within highly dedicated teams driven to create impactful new medicines. Working on projects with real patient implications, you could have the opportunity to contribute to making a meaningful, life-changing impact for millions of people around the world.

Student Workers & Internships (US)

Join AstraZeneca’s student workers or interns, and you’ll find a biopharmaceutical environment that’s full of unique opportunities and exciting challenges. Here, you’ll have the opportunity to pursue your areas of interest whilst equally developing a broad skillset and knowledge base to get the best out of your experience. You’ll be given meaningful projects from day one, and you’ll enjoy plenty of chances to network within your chosen business area, too.

Work Placement Student Programme (Sweden)

The Work Placement Student Programme provides the opportunity for you to undertake a 12-month placement in our Gothenburg site in Sweden that will introduce you to the world of innovative drug discovery pushing the boundaries of science to deliver life-changing medicines. You’ll get to do meaningful work in a pioneering research and development driven organisation.

Biometrics Graduate Programme

Locations: Canada, Poland, Spain, Sweden, UK, US

Collaborating cross-functionally with experts in a stimulating, fast-paced environment, you’ll have all the freedom, empowerment and support to add value in study design, data analytics and interpretation of our innovative portfolio of medicines. Applying your knowledge to accelerate your career and make an impact. Because here, you’re truly valued. Encouraged to speak up, ask questions, get stuck in and contribute in a meaningful way. Using your skills, passion and desire to learn, drive your development and achieve your personal and professional objectives.

Biopharmaceutical Development Graduate Programme

Locations: Cambridge, UK & Gaithersburg, US

Designed to help you transition from academia to industry, you’ll progress through different programme rotations – gaining valuable experience and insight across various functions within Biopharmaceutical Development to really push and expand your skills and knowledge. Working and collaborating on challenging technical projects across a range of therapeutic areas, you’ll find continuous opportunities to learn, develop and make a real impact. All whilst fuelling your curiosity, building lasting relationships, and working towards your personal and professional goals.

Data Science & Artificial Intelligence Graduate Programme

Locations: Cambridge, UK; Boston & Gaithersburg, US; Gothenburg, Sweden

We’re passionate about what the power of Data Science and AI can do. Right now, we’re on a journey to become a data-led enterprise that disrupts the industry and sets the standard. So, if you’re an innovative thinker with a passion for Data Science and AI, there’s never been a better time to be part of our Graduate Programme. Through the challenging, developmental placements, you’ll work closely with peers, mentors and experts to develop a broad set of skills You’ll work collaboratively, embracing new ideas and different perspectives. And you’ll bring creative, critical thinking to turn data and insights into actions that help develop life-changing medicines.

Finance Graduate Development Programme

The pace is fast and the levels of responsibility are high, but we know you have what it takes. Here, you’ll bring your ambition, skills and knowledge to enhance our business and drive progress. Leveraging data and new technology to provide insights and predictions to address business challenges and improve our organisational performance. Working closely and collaboratively with international peers and leaders, you’ll develop a deep and broad understanding of finance and the critical role it plays in supporting business performance and outcomes across our global enterprise. Grow your skills and gain the experience needed to join our next generation of finance leaders.

Local Graduate Programmes

In addition to our Global Graduate Programmes AstraZeneca has a number of local Graduate/Management Trainee Programmes available. Search by country on our global careers website, or follow the links to explore careers on your local AstraZeneca website.

Operations Graduate Programmes

Locations: China, France, Japan, Sweden, UK, US

We’re looking for open-minded, forward-thinking individuals eager to drive innovative change and influence our future direction of travel. Take the initiative, own it and run with it to make a difference for patients and our business. All while strengthening your capabilities and gaining a valuable insight into our broad business. Whether you’re looking to pursue a particular passion or are still figuring it out, the diverse experiences and transitions in the Operations Graduate Programmes will help you shape your future, no matter which path you follow.

Patient Safety Graduate Programme

Designed to help you deliver the next generation of life-changing medicines by progressing through our range of exciting placements in early and late stage drug development. Learning how Patient Safety supports clinical drug development and helps ensure the safety of our patients. You’ll grow, develop and get the opportunity to make real contributions to our projects.

Join our Patient Safety graduate programme and enjoy a high level of emphasis on your personal development and career progression, helping make a difference to our medicine, patients and society!

Pharmaceutical Technology & Development Graduate Programme

Locations: Macclesfield, UK & Gothenburg, Sweden

Tackle new scientific challenges. Seek opportunities to learn and grow in a highly supportive team. Collaborate and build close connections with peers and experts across the business. Join our PT&D graduate programme and enjoy a high level of emphasis on your personal development and career progression. Work on a variety of projects aligned to your experience and career ambitions. Build a broad skill base that will enable you to strengthen both your managerial and technical capabilities. And accelerate your learning.

Precision Medicine Academy

Precision Medicine is at the heart of what science can do at AstraZeneca. It combines the expertise of specialists from across the organisation, unlocking new potential approaches that put patients first, setting us apart from our competitors. Through advances in diagnostic testing, we are now able to identify how unique individuals respond to treatments, and match them with medicines that deliver the best outcome for them. Since 2014, we've been ranked among the top pharmaceutical companies for precision medicine approvals - proof of our world-class practices.

R&D Graduate Programme: Early Phase Drug Discovery

We’re looking for the next wave of scientists to make an impact and influence the agenda. Join our R&D programme and bring your skills, drive and curiosity to our teams and projects. Thinking innovatively and taking the initiative to help drive our drug design and development. Completing novel and cutting-edge research in state-of-the-art laboratories and developing the knowledge and confidence to become the scientist you aspire to be.

Technology Graduate Leadership Programme

Locations: UK, US, Sweden, Mexico & India

Our IT team is at the forefront of discovering and driving digital health and workplace automation to ensure our teams can continue to develop life-changing medicines. As a member of our Technology Graduate Leadership Programme, you’ll join our next wave of technology leaders. Use your skills and influence to deliver technology solutions. Improve the way we operate, serve customers and enable our teams to do their best work. And enjoy being recognised for your knowledge, experience and ideas. Together, we’ll drive our technology capabilities and make meaningful impact for our business and patients.

UK Commercial Graduate

At AstraZeneca UK, we bring life-changing medicines to patients across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. As a member of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI), all of our sales, marketing and communications activities are subject to the ABPI Code of Practice.

Being based in the heart of London, at Pancras Square, offers us the strongest possible platform to transform the lives of patients in the UK, as the country’s leading biopharmaceutical company. It will bring AstraZeneca UK closer to our customers, partners and stakeholders in the UK’s healthcare environment, as well as foster greater collaboration with the wider AstraZeneca footprint.

Clinical Research Associate (CRA) Graduate Programme

Location: Wilmington, DE

Designed to prepare you for a career as a Clinical Research Associate, you’ll progress through different programme rotations, gaining valuable experience across functions within Site Management and Monitoring and building multidisciplinary skills. Supported by experts in their field, you’ll receive mentoring and training, bringing limitless opportunities to learn, grow, and develop your strengths in different ways.

Commercial Leadership Development Programme (MBA)

On this rotational programme, you’ll have the ability to learn and grow across global functions, markets and our broad pipeline of products. Expanding your knowledge and developing a global mindset to take you to the next level. Collaborating with bright, diverse minds across the business. There’s never been a better time to be part of our journey – at the cutting edge of innovation, impacting millions of people around the world. Explore our transformational opportunities and accelerate your development.

AstraZeneca's Graduate Programmes are open to Masters level applicants. Applicants with an MBA should consider our Commercial Leadership Development Programme.

Search "AstraZeneca" on www.findaphd.com to explore any PhD studentships we are currently offering in partnership with our academic collaborators.

Postdoc Programme

Locations: UK, US and Sweden

Our Postdoc Programme is for self-motivated individuals looking to take on interesting, high-impact projects in a collaborative, challenging and reputable environment. As a respected specialist, you’ll have the freedom and autonomy to contribute known skills, and the support to rapidly learn new approaches to follow the science, innovate and make an impact. Leveraging scientific development to springboard your career whilst making a meaningful difference to patients, science, and our business. Collaborating and sharing knowledge cross functionally, together with independently leading projects in your field of interest.

R&D Postdoctoral Challenge

The R&D Postdoctoral Challenge invites final year MD and/or PhD students and Postdoctoral researchers to propose innovative ideas to transform the treatment of some of the world's most complex diseases. This exciting opportunity offers a fully funded postdoctoral position, where you will join our vibrant scientific community to conduct pioneering research within one of AstraZeneca's core disease areas or expert functions. You will have access to the expertise, compounds, novel tools and technologies, and mentoring support you need to turn your ideas into reality.

Why choose AstraZeneca?

Starting your career with us means following the science, boldly disrupting norms and supporting one another in shaping the future. Collaborate with leaders and teams across a wide range of disciplines and explore your passions. Discover your career purpose with us. And build strong bonds that will last a lifetime.

We discover, design, develop and deliver life-changing medicines. Our teams deliver innovations across all areas of our business – from diabetes care to genetics. With career paths spanning the medical lifecycle, you could be joining us in areas like Clinical Development, Data Science and AI, Finance, Manufacturing or Supply. Explore our opportunities and kickstart the career that could take you from emerging professional to renowned subject matter expert.

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Our Early Talent Awards

People are our top priority – our patients, colleagues and communities. Regardless of what programme you’re in, we bring diverse talent from all over the world together. We enable international perspectives and combine our strengths and knowledge to multiply our impact. That’s why we’ve won multiple awards as a trusted Biopharmaceuticals employer. These awards show us that we’re on the right track and they’re an incentive to work even harder on nurturing our culture and making it ever richer and more diverse.

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Work experience

The Monash Health Work Experience Program provides secondary students with the opportunity to gain insight into Monash Health as an organisation and gain experience in the healthcare industry. The program is open to year 10 students who, as a part of their school curriculum, are required to undertake work experience for a period of one week (five consecutive working days). Students are placed within departments to observe and learn. Students are able to participate in activities as appropriate according to the training or expertise they require.

Please note: Applications for 2024 are now closed.

Departments offering the work experience program include:, mmc clayton.

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Moorabbin hospital.

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Please note: We are unable to allocate students to work directly with doctors or surgeons and in areas such as: emergency department, intensive care, the operating theatres and procedural suites and other mental health care services.

Applying for work experience

Monash Health only accepts applications for Work Experience via our e-Recruit system. Ensure that you fill as out your application as per section criteria so we can allocate you to the best placement possible.

Please note:

  • Due to the high number of applications received we are unable to offer work experience to all students who apply.
  • Evidence of COVID Vaccination (2 doses) is required as per current Chief Health Officer orders 

View current opportunities

Visit the Monash Health eRecruit website

Contact information

[email protected]

Applications

Please click here to apply

A Realistic Guide to Medical School

Written by UCL students for students

Top 10 Tips: Getting into Research as a Medical Student

Introducing our new series: Top 10 Tips – a simple guide to help you achieve your goals!

In this blog post, Jessica Xie (final year UCL medical student) shares advice on getting into research as a medical student.

medical research work experience year 10

Disclaimers: 

  • Research is not a mandatory for career progression, nor is it required to demonstrate your interest in medicine. 
  • You can dip into and out of research throughout your medical career. Do not feel that you must continue to take on new projects once you have started; saying “no, thank you” to project opportunities will allow you to focus your energy and time on things in life that you are more passionate about for a more rewarding experience.
  • Do not take on more work than you are capable of managing. Studying medicine is already a full-time job! It’s physically and mentally draining. Any research that you get involved with is an extracurricular interest.

medical research work experience year 10

I decided to write this post because, as a pre-clinical medical student, I thought that research only involved wet lab work (i.e pipetting substances into test tubes). However, upon undertaking an intercalated Bachelor of Science (iBSc) in Primary Health Care, I discovered that there are so many different types of research! And academic medicine became a whole lot more exciting…

Here are my Top 10 Tips on what to do if you’re a little unsure about what research is and how to get into it:

TIP 1: DO YOUR RESEARCH (before getting into research)

There are three questions that I think you should ask yourself:

  • What are my research interests?

Examples include a clinical specialty, medical education, public health, global health, technology… the list is endless. Not sure? That’s okay too! The great thing about research is that it allows deeper exploration of an area of Medicine (or an entirely different field) to allow you to see if it interests you.

2.  What type of research project do I want to do?

Research evaluates practice or compares alternative practices to contribute to, lend further support to or fill in a gap in the existing literature.

There are many different types of research – something that I didn’t fully grasp until my iBSc year. There is primary research, which involves data collection, and secondary research, which involves using existing data to conduct further research or draw comparisons between the data (e.g. a meta-analysis of randomised control trials). Studies are either observational (non-interventional) (e.g. case-control, cross-sectional) or interventional (e.g. randomised control trial).

An audit is a way of finding out if current practice is best practice and follows guidelines. It identifies areas of clinical practice could be improved.

medical research work experience year 10

Another important thing to consider is: how much time do I have? Developing the skills required to lead a project from writing the study protocol to submitting a manuscript for publication can take months or even years. Whereas, contributing to a pre-planned or existing project by collecting or analysing data is less time-consuming. I’ll explain how you can find such projects below.

3.  What do I want to gain from this experience?

Do you want to gain a specific skill? Mentorship? An overview of academic publishing? Or perhaps to build a research network?

After conducting a qualitative interview study for my iBSc project, I applied for an internship because I wanted to gain quantitative research skills. I ended up leading a cross-sectional questionnaire study that combined my two research interests: medical education and nutrition. I sought mentorship from an experienced statistician, who taught me how to use SPSS statistics to analyse and present the data.

Aside from specific research skills, don’t forget that you will develop valuable transferable skills along the way, including time-management, organisation, communication and academic writing! 

TIP 2: BE PROACTIVE

Clinicians and lecturers are often very happy for medical students to contribute to their research projects. After a particularly interesting lecture/ tutorial, ward round or clinic, ask the tutor or doctors if they have any projects that you could help them with! 

TIP 3: NETWORKING = MAKING YOUR OWN LUCK

Sometimes the key to getting to places is not what you know, but who you know. We can learn a lot from talking to peers and senior colleagues. Attending hospital grand rounds and conferences are a great way to meet people who share common interests with you but different experiences. I once attended a conference in Manchester where I didn’t know anybody. I befriended a GP, who then gave me tips on how to improve my poster presentation. He shared with me his experience of the National institute of Health Research (NIHR) Integrated Academic Training Pathway and motivated me to continue contributing to medical education alongside my studies.

TIP 4: UTILISE SOCIAL MEDIA

Research opportunities, talks and workshops are advertised on social media in abundance. Here are some examples:

Search “medical student research” or “medsoc research” into Facebook and lots of groups and pages will pop up, including UCL MedSoc Research and Academic Medicine (there is a  Research Mentoring Scheme Mentee Scheme), NSAMR – National Student Association of Medical Research and International Opportunities for Medical Students .

Search #MedTwitter and #AcademicTwitter to keep up to date with ground-breaking research. The memes are pretty good too.

Opportunities are harder to come by on LinkedIn, since fewer medical professionals use this platform. However, you can look at peoples’ resumes as a source of inspiration. This is useful to understand the experiences that they have had in order to get to where they are today. You could always reach out to people and companies/ organisations for more information and advice.

TIP 5: JOIN A PRE-PLANNED RESEARCH PROJECT

Researchers advertise research opportunities on websites and via societies and organisations such as https://www.remarxs.com and http://acamedics.org/Default.aspx . 

TIP 6: JOIN A RESEARCH COLLABORATIVE

Research collaboratives are multiprofessional groups that work towards a common research goal. These projects can result in publications and conference presentations. However, more importantly, this is a chance to establish excellent working relationships with like-minded individuals.

Watch out for opportunities posted on Student Training and Research Collaborative .

Interested in academic surgery? Consider joining StarSurg , BURST Urology , Project Cutting Edge or Academic Surgical Collaborative .

Got a thing for global health? Consider joining Polygeia . 

TIP 7: THE iBSc YEAR: A STEPPING STONE INTO RESEARCH

At UCL you will complete an iBSc in third year. This is often students’ first taste of being involved in research and practicing academic writing – it was for me. The first-ever project that I was involved in was coding data for a systematic review. One of the Clinical Teaching Fellows ended the tutorial by asking if any students would be interested in helping with a research project. I didn’t really know much about research at that point and was curious to learn, so I offered to help. Although no outputs were generated from that project, I gained an understanding of how to conduct a systematic review, why the work that I was contributing to was important, and I learnt a thing or two about neonatal conditions. 

TIP 8: VENTURE INTO ACADEMIC PUBLISHING

One of the best ways to get a flavour of research is to become involved in academic publishing. There are several ways in which you could do this:

Become a peer reviewer. This role involves reading manuscripts (papers) that have been submitted to journals and providing feedback and constructive criticism. Most journals will provide you with training or a guide to follow when you write your review. This will help you develop skills in critical appraisal and how to write an academic paper or poster. Here are a few journals which you can apply to:

  • https://thebsdj.cardiffuniversitypress.org
  • Journal of the National Student Association of Medical Researchjournal.nsamr.ac.uk
  • https://cambridgemedicine.org/about  
  • https://www.bmj.com/about-bmj/resources-reviewers  

Join a journal editorial board/ committee. This is a great opportunity to gain insight into how a medical journal is run and learn how to get published. The roles available depend on the journal, from Editor-in-Chief to finance and operations and marketing. I am currently undertaking a Social Media Fellowship at BJGP Open, and I came across the opportunity on Twitter! Here are a few examples of positions to apply for:

  • Journal of the National Student Association of Medical Researchjournal.nsamr.ac.uk – various positions in journalism, education and website management
  • https://nsamr.ac.uk – apply for a position on the executive committee or as a local ambassador
  • Student BMJ Clegg Scholarship
  • BJGP Open Fellowships

TIP 9: GAIN EXPERIENCE IN QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

UCL Be the Change is a student-led initiative that allows students to lead and contribute to bespoke QIPs. You will develop these skills further when you conduct QIPs as part of your year 6 GP placement and as a foundation year doctor.

TIP 10: CONSIDER BECOMING A STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE

You’ll gain insight into undergraduate medical education as your role will involve gathering students’ feedback on teaching, identifying areas of curriculum that could be improved and working with the faculty and other student representatives to come up with solutions. 

It may not seem like there are any research opportunities up for grabs, but that’s where lateral thinking comes into play: the discussions that you have with your peers and staff could be a source of inspiration for a potential medical education research project. For example, I identified that, although we have lectures in nutrition science and public health nutrition, there was limited clinically-relevant nutrition teaching on the curriculum. I then conducted a learning needs assessment and contributed to developing the novel Nutrition in General Practice Day course in year 5.

Thanks for reaching the end of this post! I hope my Top 10 Tips are useful. Remember, research experience isn’t essential to become a great doctor, but rather an opportunity to explore a topic of interest further.

One thought on “Top 10 Tips: Getting into Research as a Medical Student”

This article was extremely helpful! Alothough, I’m only a junior in high school I have a few questions. First, is there anyway to prepare myself mentally for this challenging road to becoming a doctor? check our PACIFIC best medical college in Rajasthan

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Medical School Expert

Medical Work Experience At Different Ages: 15, 16, 17 Year Olds

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Every article is fact-checked by a medical professional. However, inaccuracies may still persist.

As medicine becomes ever more competitive, students are being forced to begin working on their applications at an earlier and earlier age in order to try and get a head-start on the competition.

From year 10, students may be looking to the future and trying to arrange hospital or GP placements, in addition to getting the ball rolling with some volunteering.

However, can a 15-year-old even legally work in a hospital? Is there a minimum age to do virtual work experience? Or how about actually working in healthcare?

I’m going to address all of the above (plus a whole lot more) in this article, so read on!

INCLUDED IN THIS GUIDE:

At What Age Can You Do Work Experience In A Hospital?

If you’ve already decided on medicine as a career then there’s nothing wrong with getting ahead of things by trying to arrange a hospital placement early.

But if you’re in year 10, or you’re 15-years-old, are you still able to do this? How about 16? Or do you have to be 18 to do work experience in a hospital?

Many hospitals have a minimum age of 16 for full clinical work experience participation. Some will offer a more limited package to 15-year-olds or younger, however, others will flatly not accept under-16s. Individual policies do vary between hospitals so it is always worth checking with the staff.

16 is generally the age from which you’ll be able to get the most from your work experience.

Doing too much too early won’t actually really benefit your application either- medical schools generally want to see evidence of work experience within the two years directly preceding an application.

medical research work experience year 10

This is true whether you’re an 18-year-old who did a placement when they were 15 or if you’re a postgraduate who did some work experience before going to university the first time around.

Instead of trying to bolster your application, your current motivation for seeking out work experience at a young age may in fact be to decide whether you actually you want to pursue medicine or not.

If this is the case for you, then I think it’s a great idea to go find out what doctors actually do for yourself. But, you will need to double check with any hospitals or GP practices you apply to that they accept under-16s.

At What Age Can You Work In A Medical Field?

Another great way to give your application a leg-up whilst also earning some money at the same time is to actually get a job in a medical field.

To be employed in a medical field, such as working as a healthcare assistant or care worker, you must be 16 years old or above. To start studying to become a nurse or a doctor, however, you generally must be 18 years old or above.

If you are able to hold done a healthcare related job then it can in some ways be a golden egg for your medicine application:

Strengthening your CV whilst also putting money in your pocket!

The only downside is that they can be a bit of a time-drain as your employer will normally expect a fair commitment in terms of hours worked each work.

I was lucky enough to get a job as a swimming teacher with a special needs swimming club during my application and my friend landed a job as a GP receptionist.

Neither are quite as ideal as actually working as a carer, as an example, but they did both serve a definite purpose and gave us a bit of pocket money!

As a side note, you can find out what the minimum age to go to medical school is here.

Does Volunteering Work Experience Have A Minimum Age?

Volunteering is a type of medical work experience that can be great to supplement the more ‘direct observation’ type placements you might have done in either hospital or a GP practice.

You can volunteer at a charity, a business, or even the NHS! But is there a minimum age to get involved?

Broadly, there is no set minimum age to be a volunteer with an organisation. However, for practicalities sake, organisations that would be beneficial to a student’s medical school application may be unwilling to accept students under the age of 14.

Instead of just doing two weeks shadowing a junior doctor on a ward, with volunteering you may want to develop a longer term relationship with the organisation- often 12-18 months in length.

These sorts of positions often come with a bit more responsibility too, so the organisation wants to make sure their volunteer will be up to the challenge- so setting a minimum age is an easy way for them to do this.

You can find a list of 9 different fantastic organisations who are all a perfect fit for a medicine applicant to volunteer with here, all of which you can get involved with totally for free.

Can You Do Virtual Work Experience At Any Age?

Virtual work experience can be a great compromise if you’re under-16 (so can’t get the full hospital experience) but are still keen to get involved.

Students are able to participate in virtual work experience for medicine at any age. However, just as with ‘live’ work experience, students should be aware that medical schools generally want to see evidence of work experience within the two years preceding an application.

If you’re too young to be able to arrange a shadowing placement then a ‘virtual’ experience could be the perfect way to get a taste of the experience you’d otherwise have had.

medical research work experience year 10

Although ‘virtual’ work experience is never going to be a direct one-to-one swap with actual time spent on the wards or in clinic, it is still a long way better than nothing!

If you’re raring to get going, despite being a couple of years out from your application deadline, don’t be afraid to dip your toes in the water by doing a couple of these virtual work experience courses.

I just wouldn’t go crazy and do them all as there are other things that might be better for you to spend your time on at this stage of your education.

Final Thoughts

Your age can go some way to determine how much medical work experience you’ll be able to arrange for yourself.

However, as we’ve seen, just because you’re under-18 doesn’t mean you have to sit on your hands till your birthday.

There are plenty of brilliant opportunities for 15, 16 and 17-year-olds, you just have to know what’s available to you.

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Can You Get Into Medicine Without Work Experience?

The Complete Guide To Medical Work Experience (2024)

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Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences

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Work experience

Work experience programme, public engagement, outreach events, media coverage, outreach committee, public engagement with research seed fund, opportunities and resources for staff, other placements .

A hospital-based work experience programme is also available via the NHS Voluntary Services Office.

UNIQ Summer Schools

UNIQ helps many students from diverse backgrounds to make successful applications to the University of Oxford. 

In2science empowers students from disadvantaged backgrounds to achieve their potential and progress to research careers through high quality work placements and careers guidance.

Student feedback

‘I wanted to say thank you for giving me the opportunity to take part in the work experience programme. It was amazing to be able to talk to so many doctors and researchers and find out about their work and this week has really highlighted to me that medicine is what I would like to be doing in the future.’ 

‘The work experience programme made me consider intercalating at medical school and find an area of research I’m interested in, which I can potentially pursue as an academic doctor.’

‘The placement reaffirmed my interest in science and also made research appear more appealing and possible. It also increased my medical experience and has given me experiences I can talk about.’

'The placement has made me interested in research, as I now realise that research and clinical aspects of medicine are very interlinked and depend on each other.'

medical research work experience year 10

Spend valuable time in the lab

medical research work experience year 10

Enjoy a fun liquid nitrogen demo

medical research work experience year 10

Discover the range of healthcare facilities

medical research work experience year 10

Carry out practical work with our scientists

medical research work experience year 10

Shadow surgeons and research nurses on the wards

medical research work experience year 10

Discuss and take part in current research

medical research work experience year 10

See demonstrations of innovative new technology

medical research work experience year 10

Learn new skills and techniques in the lab

Nds work experience programme for students aged 16 or over.

The Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (NDS) at the University of Oxford provides a limited number of work experience placements for students aged 16 years old or over. We offer 12 placements over two weeks (six students per week) in July of every year.

The five-day programme is designed to offer students valuable experience in science and medicine, and will include time in the lab, the opportunity to shadow clinicians and research nurses, and a careers talk and feedback session.

During the week, students will take part in hands-on activities within different research groups in order to:

  • Build knowledge and basic lab skills and techniques;
  • Gain an understanding of how academic research and clinical trials are conducted;
  • Experience the range of research areas and professions within NDS.

Previous NDS Work Experience Programmes have included:

  • An introduction to organ transplant, which involved learning about the impact of different perfusion devices in preserving organs
  • A demonstration of the High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)
  • Shadowing surgeons and research nurses on the urology ward
  • Carrying out practical work with scientists from the Transplantation Research and Immunology Group (TRIG)
  • A tour of the hospital, which involved visiting the wards and talking to patients
  • An introduction to global surgery
  • Meeting the Head of Department, Professor Freddie Hamdy
  • Carrying out a chocolate trial in the Surgical Intervention Trials Unit (SITU)

NDS Work Experience Programme 2023

Read about the 2023 NDS Work Experience Programme

NDS WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAMME 2022

Read about the 2022 NDS Work Experience Programme

NDS Virtual Work Experience Programme 2020 and 2021

Due to the COVID-19 situation, we were not able to offer our usual on-site programme. However, we were pleased that we were able to provide an alternative programme online.

Read about the 2020 NDS Virtual Work Experience Programme

Read about the 2021 NDS and NDORMS Virtual Work Experience Programme

NDS WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAMME 2024

Applications for the 2024 NDS Work Experience Programme are now closed.

The work experience dates for 2024 are:

Week 1: 8-12  July 

Week 2:  15-19 July

Students attend for one of the two weeks listed above.    

If you have any questions, please email Louise King ( [email protected] )

Students must be aged 16 or over on the first day of the placement. 

Have you thought of a career in medical research?

We are hosting a series of online talks/conversations with scientists from NDS, NDORMS and other University of Oxford Medical Science departments for Y12 students. These will be a mix of information about both the scientists careers and their research work with plenty of time for Q&As on either.

‘I really enjoyed the ability to see a range of areas of the hospital from clinical exposure to trying out research for ourselves.’

‘It was a great week and I learnt a lot. I especially enjoyed meeting so many different doctors and scientists.’

‘I found the tour of the hospital and the time spent in clinics the most useful, as it involved visiting the wards and talking to patients, which was my first patient contact. It was interesting to hear how the doctors spoke to patients one-on-one when having to deliver potentially devastating news.’

‘I really enjoyed the session to do with the HIFU research. It was really interesting and I may use this for a research project of my own.’

‘I really enjoyed the hands-on approach to the work experience and the openness which let me feel comfortable enough to ask questions. I loved the range of areas we got involved in. All parts we visited were extremely interesting and I will feel more inclined to follow the NDS research in the future.’

‘It has motivated me to read up more about clinical trials and ongoing research which has further inspired me to pursue a career in clinical research. It has shown me how varied a career in science is and how many different fields you could go into.’

'It was a good variety of experience, all was presented well, and was all very interesting. I particularly enjoyed shadowing doctors and nurses and seeing the HIFU machine.'

‘The most useful part for me was the time spent in the lab, as it showed what the life of a research scientist was like. The most interesting bit though was being in the clinic with patients, seeing the patient-doctor interactions and the tour by the vascular surgeon.’

‘I really enjoyed the morning we spent in the labs culturing CHO: CD154 cells and discussing current research that was taking place there.’

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Work experience for years 10 and 11 students

The UTS Science Work Experience Program is cancelled for 2023 intake.   Please contact [email protected] if you have any questions about the program. 

UTS Science has a High School Work Experience program available for high school students in NSW in conjunction with the Department of Education and Training’s (DET) guidelines.

About the program

The program is designed to give student a broad overview of science by engaging the student in each of the above areas for selected periods throughout the week. A typical program looks like this:

Selecting students for the program

We aim to offer students who are genuinely interested in science a chance to obtain a placement in our program.

Further, we would like to give students from all backgrounds the opportunity to participate in our program. Thus, we try to allocate 50% of our placements to students from rural and regional areas in NSW. This also means we can only accept two students from each school.

If there are more than two applicants from the same school, students from that school may be selected on a first come, first placed basis. We also try to team up students who are in the same year.

Nature of the work

As much as possible the student will be involved actively in the work of the areas listed. However because of Work, Health & Safety constraints and because of the prior need for knowledge, accuracy and skill, the actual hands-on content is limited. Allowable and safe activities may include:

  • assisting with putting materials out for classes and later removing them
  • preparing sample material and specimens
  • data collection
  • joining tertiary students in their experimental work
  • performing experimental work under the supervision of technical staff
  • working with scientific equipment.

Induction and information

Induction and information is provided to ensure safety in the laboratory.  Personal protective equipment such as laboratory coats, safety glasses and gloves are provided.

Supervision

The work experience student is supervised at all times when in the laboratory. Task supervisors are most likely to be a member of technical staff, but may at times be an academic or a postgraduate research student.

Work experience in one area

We don’t accept requests for work experience in one particular area for longer than the time indicated in the typical program because of the limitations of staff availability. 

While there are many requests from students expressing their desire to spend a full week in the forensic science area, we are unable to meet this request.

General information for students

Hours of work.

The normal working day for work experience is 9.00 am to 4.00 pm, though this is subject to variation. We usually allow an hour for lunch.

What to wear

You will be in a laboratory and not in an office. Wear comfortable day clothes and regular shoes or joggers that are sturdy and cover all of the feet (you won’t be allowed into the labs without proper footwear). Don’t wear expensive clothing.

If a student needs to leave earlier than the time specified, either their school or a parent should notify us of this in advance by phone or email.

We allow students the freedom to explore the wider University campus where various cafés and UTS Union facilities are located, as well as nearby fast food outlets on George Street.

We require the student to remain in mobile phone contact during this time. If a parent or a school wishes to constrain the student’s movement to within the Science building only, then please advise us accordingly.

Students are provided with a locker to house bags and personal belongings.

Our work experience program this year will run during the UTS Spring and Summer sessions. Please note we are not able to host work experience students outside these times.

If you are still interested in applying for 2023, please check-in on our website for openings early next year.

UTS acknowledges the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation, the Boorooberongal people of the Dharug Nation, the Bidiagal people and the Gamaygal people, upon whose ancestral lands our university stands. We would also like to pay respect to the Elders both past and present, acknowledging them as the traditional custodians of knowledge for these lands.

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How to get involved in research as a medical student

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  • Peer review
  • Anna Kathryn Taylor , final year medical student 1 ,
  • Sarah Purdy , professor of primary care and associate dean 1
  • 1 Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Bristol, UK

Participating in research gives students great skills and opportunities. Anna Taylor and Sarah Purdy explain how to get started

This article contains:

-How to get involved with research projects

-Questions to ask yourself before starting research

-What can you get published? Research output

-Advice for contacting researchers

-Different types of research explained

-Stages of research projects

Students often go into medicine because of a desire to help others and improve patients’ physical and mental wellbeing. In the early years of medical school, however, it can seem as if you are not making much difference to patient care. Involvement in research can provide exciting opportunities to work as part of a team, improve career prospects, and most importantly add to the evidence base, leading to better outcomes for patients.

Research is usually multidisciplinary, including clinical academics (medical doctors who spend part of their working life doing research), nurses, patients, scientists, and researchers without a medical background. Involvement in such a team can improve your communication skills and expand your understanding of how a multidisciplinary team works.

Participating in research can also help you to develop skills in writing and critical appraisal through the process of publishing your work. You may be able to present your work at conferences—either as a poster or an oral presentation—and this can provide valuable points for job applications at both foundation programme and core training level. This is particularly important if you are considering a career in academia. You will also develop skills in time management, problem solving, and record keeping. You might discover an area of medicine in which you are keen to carry out further work. For some people, getting involved in research as a medical student can be the first step in an academic career.

Kyla Thomas, National Institute for Health Research clinical lecturer in public health at the University of Bristol, says, “my first baby steps into a clinical academic career started with a research project I completed as a medical student. That early involvement in research opened my eyes to a whole new world of opportunities that I never would have considered.

“Importantly, participating in undergraduate research sets students apart from their colleagues. Applying for foundation posts is a competitive process and it is a definite advantage if you have managed to obtain a peer reviewed publication.”

Getting involved with research projects

Although it is possible to do research at medical school, it is important to be realistic about how much free time you have. It might be possible to set up your own research project, but this will require substantial planning in terms of writing research protocols, gaining ethical approval, and learning about new research methodologies. Other opportunities for research that make less demands on your time include:

Intercalated degrees—these often have time set aside for research in a specific area, so it is important to choose your degree according to what you might like to do for your dissertation (for example, laboratory-based work in biochemistry, or qualitative research in global health. Some subjects may have options in both qualitative and quantitative research).

Student selected components or modules can provide a good opportunity to be involved in an ongoing study or research project. If you have a long project period, you might be able to develop your own small project.

Electives and summer holidays can also provide dedicated time for research, either within the United Kingdom or in another country. They can allow you to become established in a research group if you’re there for a few weeks, and can lead to a longstanding relationship with the research group if you continue to work with them over your medical school career.

If you don’t know what to do, contacting the Student Audit and Research in Surgery (STARSurg), 1 the National Student Association of Medical Research (NSAMR), 2 or your medical school’s research society may be a good place to start.

The INSPIRE initative, 3 coordinated by the Academy of Medical Sciences, gives support and grants to help students take part in research. Some UK medical schools have small grants for elective and summer projects, and organise taster days for students to get an idea of different research areas.

You may also be able to access other grants or awards to support your research. Some of the royal colleges, such as the Royal College of General Practitioners and the Royal College of Psychiatrists, offer bursaries to students doing research in their holidays or presenting at conferences. Other national organisations, such as the Medical Women’s Federation, offer bursaries for elective projects.

Box 1: Questions to ask yourself before starting research

What are you interested in? There is no point getting involved in a project area that you find boring.

How much time do you have available? It is crucial to think about this before committing to a project, so that your supervisor can give you an appropriate role.

What do you want to get out of your research experience? Do you want a brief insight into research? Or are you hoping for a publication or presentation?

Do you know any peers or senior medical students who are involved in research? Ask them about their experiences and whether they know of anyone who might be willing to include you in a project.

Box 2: Research output

Publication —This is the “gold standard” of output and usually consists of an article published in a PubMed ID journal. This can lead to your work being cited by another researcher for their paper, and you can get up to two extra points on foundation programme applications if you have published papers with a PubMed ID.

Not all research will get published, but there are other ways to show your work, such as presenting at conferences:

Oral presentation —This involves giving a short talk about your research, describing the background, methods, and results, then talking about the implications of your findings.

Poster presentation —This involves creating a poster, usually A1 or A2 in size, summarising the background, methods, and results of your research. At a conference, presenters stand by their poster and answer questions from other delegates.

Contacting researchers

Most universities have information about their research groups on their websites, so spend some time exploring what studies are being carried out and whether you are interested in one of the research topics.

When contacting a member of the research group, ask if they or someone else within their team would be willing to offer you some research experience. Be honest if you don’t have any prior experience and about the level of involvement you are looking for, but emphasise what it is about their research that interests you and why you want to work with them. It’s important to have a flexible approach to what they offer you—it may not initially sound very exciting, but it will be a necessary part of the research process, and may lead to more interesting research activity later.

Another way to make contact with researchers is at university talks or lectures. It might be intimidating to approach senior academics, but if you talk to them about your interest they will be more likely to remember you if you contact them later on.

Box 3: What can students offer research teams?—Views from researchers

“Medical students come to research with a ‘fresh eyes’ perspective and a questioning mindset regarding the realities of clinical practice which, as a non-medic myself, serves to remind me of the contextual challenges of implementing recommendations from our work.”

Alison Gregory, senior research associate, Centre for Academic Primary Care, University of Bristol, UK.

“Enthusiasm, intelligence, and a willingness to learn new skills to solve challenges—bring those attributes and you’ll be valuable to most research teams.”

Tony Pickering, consultant anaesthetist and Wellcome Trust senior research fellow, University of Bristol, UK.

Box 4: Different types of research

Research aims to achieve new insights into disease, investigations, and treatment, using methodologies such as the ones listed below:

Qualitative research —This can be used to develop a theory and to explain how and why people behave as they do. 4 It usually involves exploring the experience of illness, therapeutic interventions, or relationships, and can be compiled using focus groups, structured interviews, consultation analysis, 5 or ethnography. 6

Quantitative research —This aims to quantify a problem by generating numerical data, and may test a hypothesis. 7 Research projects can use chemicals, drugs, biological matter, or even computer generated models. Quantitative research might also involve using statistics to evaluate or compare interventions, such as in a randomised controlled trial.

Epidemiological research —This is the study of the occurrence and distribution of disease, the determinants influencing health and disease states, and the opportunities for prevention. It often involves the analysis of large datasets. 4

Mixed methods research —This form of research incorporates both quantitative and qualitative methodologies.

Systematic reviews —These provide a summary of the known evidence base around a particular research question. They often create new data by combining other quantitative (meta-analysis) or qualitative (meta-ethnography) studies. They are often used to inform clinical guidelines.

Box 5: Stages of research projects

Project conception—Come up with a hypothesis or an objective for the project and form the main research team.

Write the research protocol—Produce a detailed description of the methodology and gain ethical approval, if needed.

Carry out the methodology by collecting the data.

Analyse the data.

Decide on the best way to disseminate your findings—for example, a conference presentation or a publication—and where you will do this.

Write up your work, including an abstract, in the format required by your chosen journal or conference.

Submit . For conference abstracts, you may hear back swiftly whether you have been offered the chance to present. Publication submissions, however, must be peer reviewed before being accepted and it can take over a year for a paper to appear in print.

Originally published as: Student BMJ 2017;25:i6593

Competing interests: AKT received grant money from INSPIRE in 2013.

Provenance and peer review: Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • ↵ STARSurg. Student Audit and Research in Surgery. 2016. www.starsurg.org .
  • ↵ NSAMR. National Student Association of Medical Research. 2016. www.nsamr.org .
  • ↵ The Academy of Medical Sciences. About the INSPIRE initiative. 2016. www.acmedsci.ac.uk/careers/mentoring-and-careers/INSPIRE/about-INSPIRE/ .
  • ↵ Ben-Shlomo Y, Brookes ST, Hickman M. Lecture Notes: Epidemiology, Evidence-based Medicine and Public Health. 6th ed . Wiley-Blackwell, 2013 .
  • ↵ gp-training.net. Consultation Theory. 2016. www.gp-training.net/training/communication_skills/consultation/consultation_theory.htm .
  • ↵ Reeves S, Kuper A, Hodges BD. Qualitative research methodologies: ethnography. BMJ 2008 ; 337 : a1020 . doi:10.1136/bmj.a1020   pmid:18687725 . OpenUrl FREE Full Text
  • ↵ Porta M. A Dictionary of Epidemiology. 5th ed . Oxford University Press, 2008 .

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Careers Lab: work experience programme

Take your first step into a career in cancer research.

medical research work experience year 10

Our Careers Lab Work Experience Programme provides sixth form (Year 12 and Year 13) students with a week-long opportunity to explore various career paths within the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute. Aimed at those interested in gaining practical insights into different professional fields, the programme challenges preconceptions about working in science while aligning with our mission to our aim to beat cancer sooner.

We currently offer two distinct types of placement:

1) Year 12/13 Research Placement 

Engage in hands-on experiences within our cutting-edge research laboratories, delving into the world of cancer biology. Gain exposure to state-of-the-art Core Facilities, teams dedicated to developing and applying specific technologies, and learn from experts in microscopy, genomics and animal technology. While each placement is unique to its research group, expect to acquire skills and experiences such as:

  • How to culture cells
  • Tissue staining techniques
  • Understanding the basics of microscopy and tissue compositions
  • How to isolate and multiply DNA

2) Year 12/13 Operations Placement  

Explore non-scientific roles within our Operations Team, responsible for the seamless functioning of the Institute. This placement offers insights into various departments, including Finance & Grants, Human Resources, and Property Services. Our operations staff come from a range of backgrounds, and no scientific background is required for this placement. Rotations could include:

  • Managing a multi-million-pound portfolio of grants
  • Attracting top scientists to join our labs
  • Creating a culture where science and fun intersect
  • Creating and maintaining the physical environment of the Institute

Whether you’re passionate about science or seeking a non-scientific career path to enable vital cancer research, our programme opens doors to a diverse range of opportunities within the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute.

Eligibility

Applicants must be enrolled in sixth form, or equivalent, and currently in Year 12 or Year 13.

What are we looking for?

  • Interest in the programme: We seek candidates who genuinely demonstrate a keen interest in the Careers Lab programme, showcasing a passion for the opportunities it presents and a clear understanding of how it aligns with their personal and professional goals.
  • Intellectual curiosity: We value candidates who exhibit a strong sense of intellectual curiosity, an eagerness to explore new ideas, and a proactive approach to learning. Individuals who enjoy delving into diverse topics and consistently seek to broaden their knowledge are highly regarded.
  • Perseverance: Perseverance is a key attribute we look for in candidates. We seek individuals who demonstrate resilience, determination, and the ability to navigate challenges effectively. Candidates who view setbacks as opportunities for growth and consistently strive to overcome obstacles align well with this criterion.
  • Commitment to improving the lives of others: We are interested in candidates who show a genuine commitment to making a positive impact on the lives of others. This can manifest in various forms, such as a dedication to community service, a passion for social causes, or a desire to contribute to the well-being and advancement of individuals and communities.

Applicants are encouraged to reflect on these criteria and showcase specific examples from their experiences that highlight their alignment with these qualities.

medical research work experience year 10

  • Application Period: 10 January 10 – 12 February 2024
  • Interviews Scheduled (Virtual): February – March 2024
  • Reference Check for Shortlisted Candidates: Mid-March 2024
  • Final Placements Confirmation: Late April 2024
  • Careers Lab Programme (In Person): 1 July – 5 July 2024

Application form:

  • Complete a 5-10 minute form providing academic and personal details.
  • Express why you are interested in applying for the Careers Lab programme.

Careers Lab personal statement (within the application form): Respond to the following prompts within the application form:

  • In no more than 100 words, explain why you are applying for this programme.
  • In no more than 100 words, describe the skills you currently possess and identify the skills you need to gain for success in your dream career.

Sixth Form College Reference: If shortlisted for an interview, we will contact a member of staff at your school or sixth form colleg e. They will be asked to provide an assessment based on the following criteria:

  • Interest in the programme
  • Intellectual curiosity
  • Perseverance
  • Commitment to improving the lives of others

Follow the link below to apply.

How we select

Careers Lab uses a comprehensive two-stage selection process to ensure that our placements align with our criteria:

Application Form: To be considered for a Careers Lab Work Experience placement for Year 12/13, completion of the application form in full is mandatory.

Shortlisting and Interview: Shortlisted candidates are invited to a virtual interview to assess their alignment with the four Careers Lab criteria. The brief interview will assess your motivations for applying to the programme. Alternative arrangements will be made to accommodate individuals with limited internet accessibility.

Details about the format and arrangements will be sent according to the application timeline. The interview consists of three main sections:

  • Welcome and introduction
  • Interview questions
  • Final thoughts and answering your questions

If not called for an interview, you will receive an email confirming that your application was not successful.

Please note that we are not able to provide feedback to unsuccessful applicants.

Contact us: [email protected] with any additional queries!

Undergraduate Summer Research Placements

If you are an undergraduate student, looking to find a research placement over the summer vacation period, please visit our Summer Research Placements page.

For any other questions, please get in touch using our contact form .

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At Goulburn Valley Health we are a Teaching Hospital hosting undergraduate, graduate, post-graduate, interns and work experience students each year.

Our online information centre aims to be a central contact point for all academic agencies and students and provides valuable details about clinical, field and work experience placements at our hospital.

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Our health care teams are committed to the education of students on clinical placement and to new graduates looking for a well-rounded introduction to their chosen career path. We actively support student placement education programs as a key strategy in promoting rural workforce recruitment and retention. Students from a range of disciplines and academic institutions undertake placements at GV Health during the year.

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GV Health offers accommodation for visiting students in a nearby student house with single bedroom accommodation at a nominal price. Alternatively, there is a range of accommodation options available throughout the town ranging from caravan parks, motels and apartments.

GV Health provides high school students with the opportunity to explore the wide array of careers available in health. For students interested in experiencing what a career in health may look like, work experience is available in the following areas:

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Why is work experience needed?

Medical schools require applicants to have an understanding of what a career in medicine involves. It is therefore essential that applicants gain people-focused experience of providing care or service before submitting their application.

There are two basic types of experience that applicants can have:

  • Working with other people in a caring or service role, and in particular with people who are ill, disabled or disadvantaged. (Strongly recommended)
  • Direct observation of healthcare.

It is important to remember that work experience can take many forms. It can be a voluntary opportunity or a paid job. While shadowing a doctor can be useful, medical schools recognise that this is not attainable for everyone. They see volunteering in a residential care home as just as good a source of experience. If you have a weekend job in a shop, then this can be a good source of experience too.

Where to start

To get work experience, prepare a short CV and hand this in to places in your area which relate to healthcare, saying that you are willing to volunteer. These places could be care homes, hospices, general practice surgeries, and of course hospitals. If you have no luck with this then do not worry.

Other useful activities might include reading medical journals or following news about the National Health Service. These things will emphasise an interest in a medical career and willingness to research. If you know any doctors or can talk to your GP then arranging time to speak with one will provide you with material to use in the interview, as well as demonstrate motivation and initiative. All healthcare professionals can be a valuable source of information and experience, not just doctors. After all, doctors work as part of large teams involving many healthcare professions, so demonstrating that you have a sense of those professions and how they work together will help you in both your personal statement and interview.

It is important to remember that your experiences are only as good as how you reflect on them in your personal statement and at interview. The ability to reflect on what you have learnt, both about yourself and about medicine, through your experiences is the key thing medical schools are looking for when they assess your application.

Work experience guidance during the Covid-19 pandemic

Medical schools are aware that the opportunities open to you have been affected and will take this into account. M ake sure to check the medical school’s website for information on work experience. Additionally, keep in mind that clinical work experience is not generally a requirement for applying to medical school in any year. 

Read our  guidance on gaining relevant experience to study medicine in the time of Covid-19  for ideas on how to gain experience during the pandemic. Our tips for gaining relevant experience include:

Keeping a reflective diary on what is happening in the news and online

Many healthcare professionals are posting online about their experience of working during the pandemic. Listen to what they have to say and reflect on this. All healthcare professionals can be a valuable source of information and experience, not just doctors. After all, doctors work as part of large teams involving many healthcare professions, so demonstrating that you have a sense of those professions and how they work together will help you in both your personal statement and interview. Remember that some media sources are more reliable than others and that sometimes ‘political spin’ is put on articles to help create a headline.

Making use of online resources

There are some fantastic free online resources available that will give you a taste of what working in healthcare is all about. For example:

  • Brighton and Sussex Medical School has created a free   virtual work experience   course which explores several different medical specialities
  • RCGP has also created a free interactive platform called   Observe GP   which highlights the many different aspects of working in primary care
  • The GMC and NHS England have developed a free virtual reality app providing insight into a patient's journey to GP practice

Volunteer in your spare time

All forms of voluntary work can provide helpful work experience. While volunteer work in the NHS might be disrupted at this time other schemes may still be in operation and worth exploring.

Useful volunteering websites may include, but are not limited to:

  • The   Do IT   website
  • The   Nextdoor   website

Gaining relevant experience to study medicine and the impact of Covid-19

 Further reading

  • Guidance on relevant experience for applying to medical school
  • Guidance on gaining relevant experience to study medicine in the time of Covid-19
  • Work experience  - in fosheet  
  • Doctor, doctor... How do I get work experience? - GP Work Experience Toolkit

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These courses have been recognised by medical schools as a suitable element of relevant experience to help prepare an application to medicine.

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140+ Work Experience Ideas (Ideal for Year 10 and Year 12)

In A-Level , Career , GCSE , General by Think Student Editor January 17, 2024 2 Comments

When it comes to applying for jobs and university, you need to find a way to make your application stand out. When you’re fresh out of school or university, this can be difficult as you will often not have much to put onto your university application or CV. Something that can help to make you stand out from the crowd is having experience, particularly in the area that you want to go into. While work experience can be an important part of your application, it can be difficult to know how to get it.

Continue reading to get some ideas on how to get work experience to give your applications a boost. This article will list ideas for particular sectors and give you more of an idea of how you can actually do this work experience yourself.

Table of Contents

General work experience ideas

Getting work experience can incredibly important and useful regardless of what you want to do in the future. Even if you’re not sure what you want to study or don’t have any particular career that you’re interested in, getting work experience is still worth your time.

If this is the case for you, you’ll probably look for more general and less specific work experience that can be applied to many different study or career paths.

1. Volunteer at a charity shop

Volunteering at a charity shop can be one of the best ways to get work experience. It can also be one of the easiest ways.

While other forms of work experience may require you to meet specific requirements in order to be able to do it, getting work experience at a charity shop will not normally need this. Getting work experience in a charity shop can be done either by applying on their website or applying in-store.

For more on this, you can look at this page from the British Heart Foundation and this page by Oxfam.

2. Work at a café or restaurant

Working at a café or restaurant can be a great way to get work experience in hospitality. This type of work experience can be done through voluntary or paid work.

To get paid work experience at a café or restaurant, simply apply on either their website or a job search site, such as Indeed or Reed. If you need the work experience for a specific time slot, such as for your work experience week, it may be best to go to a small restaurant or café and contact them directly to ask if this would be possible. You may also want to try a community café, which may already have voluntary positions.

3. Volunteer at a food bank

The requirements that you need to volunteer at a food bank may differ slightly depending on the organisation that the food bank is a part of. If your local food bank is smaller, you may be able to contact them directly through email or phone and ask about volunteering positions .

However, if part of a large network of food banks, getting this work experience can normally be done by applying on their website. Although for both options you may need parental permission if you’re under 18. To learn more about this, check out this page by The Trussel Trust.

4. Get work experience at a hotel

Getting work experience in a hotel can be great as it gives you a taste of several different job areas, such as hospitality, business and customer service. Some hotel chains will have work experience programmes of their own and to get these you will just need to apply.

For example, the IHG Academy Work Experience allows students to work shadow at IHG hotels for up to 2 weeks. To learn more about this programme, check out this page on the IHG website. The Grand Brighton hotel also has a work experience placement for students in the area, which you can learn more about here on their website.

Other hotels may not advertise work experience. However, it can’t hurt to contact them and ask if you could do work experience with them.

5. Volunteer with a charity

As already mentioned, volunteering at a charity shop is one of the easiest and most accessible ways to get work experience. However, there are many other ways to get work experience by getting involved in a charity.

The exact roles included in this will depend on the nature of the charity itself. For Age UK, roles may be related to helping older people at social clubs or day centres run by the charity. To learn more about this, check out the Age UK website .

For other charities, volunteer roles may include gardening, admin work or befriending. To learn more about this and how to get involved, check out this page on the Sue Ryder website.

6. Volunteer at your local library

Work experience at a library can vary based on what your local council’s policies are and what your local library offers. Due to this, how you can get work experience at a library can also.

You can often apply for either a work experience placement or a volunteering position by directly contacting the library . However, you may instead need to apply through your school. For more on this, check out this page by Aberdeen City Council.

Some council’s will require you to be 18 before being able to volunteer with their libraries. If this is the case, you may still be able to get a library work experience placement with the British library.

This can be in-person or virtually and will last 1 or 2 weeks. To learn more about getting this work experience, check out this page by the British Library.

7. Get involved in local events or festivals

Getting involved in local events and festivals can be an excellent way to get work experience and develop your organisation and problem-solving skills. There are so many different, independent events and festivals that take place in the UK and so there’s no set way of getting this work experience.

However, if the event has its own website or social media page, you may be able to use it to contact the organisers and ask if they have volunteering or work experience available for you. It is important to note that some event and festival volunteering opportunities will only be open to people above 18.

To get you started, click here to find a list of festivals and events in the UK on the Visit England website.

Medical and healthcare-related work experience ideas

If you’re planning to go to university and study either a medicine degree or some kind of NHS-funded healthcare degree, then universities will typically want you to have work experience. The work experience that you need will often be in order to show off your personal qualities, such as resilience, motivation and communication, as well as to make sure that you understand what the role you are aiming for involves. For degrees related to these, such as Pharmacy, Pharmacology or Biomedical Sciences, work experience could also still be useful.

Please note that the following work experience ideas are partially based off this page by the NHS.

8. Get work experience at your local hospital

While you won’t be directly involved in treating patients, getting work experience for medicine or a healthcare profession at your local hospital or clinic could be a great way for you to get a better understanding of what’s involved in this profession.

How you get this work experience may depend on where you live and the policies these hospitals have. However, many hospitals already have volunteering positions, which you can often find on their websites in the careers section.

Otherwise, you may want to email them more directly to ask if you would be able to volunteer with them . To find your local hospital, check out this page on the NHS website.

9. Get work experience at your local GP surgery

Once again, how you get work experience with your local GP may depend on where you live and the policies the GP has. GP surgery websites that I’ve come across don’t particularly have a clear section to tell you about volunteering positions available.

However, they will often have a section on their website where you can message them and ask if there are work experience or volunteering positions available. To find your local GP’s website, check out this page by the NHS.

10. Volunteer at a care home

As care homes are generally private, getting work experience at a care home can vary much more as it will fully depend on the policies of who runs it. You may want to look at a particular care home company’s website to see what positions for work experience or volunteering that they may have available . For example, Care UK offers a work experience placement for school pupils as well as a work placement for school leavers that last between 2 and 4 weeks, which you can learn more about on their website here .

Otherwise, you can look at finding the care home most accessible to you. To do this, look at this page by EAC Housing Care to find a list of care homes in the UK.

11. Get work experience at a dentist surgery

For a Dentistry degree, work experience is once again vital. Similarly to a GP, there is generally little in the way of volunteering positions or obvious work experience placements.

However, there are often ways, such as through email or through their website, that you can contact the dentist surgery and ask about any work experience or volunteering positions that may be available. To find your local dentist surgery, check out this page by the NHS.

12. Get work experience at a pharmacy company

There are 2 main ways that you can get work experience in pharmacy. This can be either through voluntary work experience or paid work.

If you’re over 16, you may be able to get work experience with a pharmaceutical company on a placement in summer. To learn more about this and find which companies may offer these programmes, check out this guide by ABPI.

You may also be able to work in your local pharmacy as a counter assistant or similar job. To find jobs, such as these, check out this page by Indeed.

13. Get work experience at a mental health clinic or hospital

To do this work experience, you can look on a mental health clinic or hospital’s website to see what voluntary positions they have available . For younger students, this type of work experience may be more difficult to get as for some clinics and hospitals, you will need to be at least 18 to volunteer.

If you’re in Year 10 or Year 12 and need to find a work experience placement for the week, you may still be able to contact them directly, such as through email, and ask if doing the work experience for a limited time is possible. To find your local mental health clinic or hospital, check out this page by the NHS.

Health and social care work experience ideas

Health and social care roles refer to careers where individuals help others who have social, physical or mental needs. Consequently, finding work experience can be difficult, as you may need certain qualifications.

Regardless, there are plenty of opportunities out there which are related to this sector in some way!

14. Volunteer at a residential care home

There are plenty of care homes around the UK you could volunteer at. You wouldn’t be required to do any caring duties.

Your role would be to just maybe chat to the residents and keep them company, or maybe organise some activities which you could do with them. Just call up a local care home and ask!

15. Volunteer for a charity such as AgeUK

AgeUK specifically supports older people who may feel lonely. By becoming a volunteer, you could work in a charity shop and raise money. Alternatively, you could become a telephone friend and talk to those older individuals who may feel lonely.

You can discover more volunteer opportunities if you check out this article from the AgeUk website.

16. Shadow a professional working for the NHS

There are plenty of different caring roles in the NHS. Therefore, it would be best for you to research the specific role you are interested in.

Then contact as many organisations as you can which offer NHS services . Check out this page from the NHS website to discover how you can actually find shadowing opportunities.

17. Virtual work experience

It may be hard to find opportunities for shadowing professionals in the health and social care sector. Therefore, virtual work experience is a Godsend!

Springpod offers virtual work experience for a range of different health and social care careers, allowing participants to get a well-rounded view! You can check this out if you visit their website here .

18. Volunteer at a special school

There are schools in the UK specifically built for children with physical and mental disabilities. These children need lots of extra support, so if you volunteer at one, you need to be aware of the great responsibility you would be given.

If you are interested in a caring role such as this, it would be best to contact these types of schools local to you.

19. Volunteer in an aid working charity

An example of a charity that offers aid to those in need is the British Red Cross. You could volunteer to help those individuals who are in emergency situations, strengthening your skill set to help vulnerable people.

Helping vulnerable people is the main aim of roles related to health and social care. There are other volunteer roles available which you can even do virtually! To find out more, check out the British Red Cross website here .

20. Become a childminder

If you are thinking about working with children in a career related to health and social care, becoming a babysitter of childminder can provide valuable work experience. This is because it will allow you to gain a real insight into how children behave and develop.

Consider putting up an advert displaying your services in your local corner shop or even on social media if this is done in a safe manner.

21. Shadow a social worker

Social workers are individuals who help to improve their client’s well-being and offer support if they are facing tough challenges. If you know any companies which employ social workers and this job interests you, it may be useful to call them up!

You could then gain a real insight into the career. Check out this article from Social Work News to discover some useful tips on shadowing a social worker.

22. Volunteer as a youth worker

You could volunteer at a youth centre and gain valuable experience working with youths from all kinds of different backgrounds. You could be involved in organising fun activities and helping the youths to increase their confidence!

This experience will not only help you stand out but could also allow you to find important contacts. You can find out more about youth workers if you check out this article from Indeed.

23. Peer mentor

Becoming a peer mentor is a more accessible way of gaining work experience. This is because many schools have a peer mentoring scheme.

If this is the case, maybe ask a teacher if they could introduce peer mentoring, as it will give you valuable experience of working with younger individuals. To discover how to be the best peer mentor possible, check out this article from the Together Platform.

Teaching and working with children or vulnerable people work experience ideas

Two more of the degree areas that will generally need you to have work experience to be able to get onto the degree programme are teaching and social work. While not directly linked, both of these degree programmes are linked with working with children and may also be linked with working with vulnerable people. Due to this, the work experience options that you can get for them largely overlap.

24. Get work experience at a primary school

A great way to get work experience in teaching is to go back to your old primary school to get work experience there. If this is not possible or convenient, then you can always contact other local primary schools to see if you can do work experience with them.

The best way to get this work experience is to directly contact the primary school. As you’ll be working around children, you may need to get a DBS check if you’re over 16.

25. Get work experience at a secondary school

Another way to get work experience is at your local secondary school. This is arguably much easier as you would have gone to the secondary school much more recently and may even still have their contact details.

In fact, if you go to a sixth form that is connected to a secondary school, you may even be able to do this without having to formally contact the school. Otherwise, the best way to get this experience is to directly contact the school that you want to do the work experience at and ask if this would be possible and what requirements you would need to meet .

26. Volunteer at a youth club

How you can get a volunteering position at a youth club will depend on who runs the club and your location. If the club is registered with your local authority, you may be able to apply or register your interest on its website. For example, if you live in London, you can find different positions on the Greater London Authority website, such as this position here .

Otherwise, you may want to contact the youth club organisers directly. You may be able to find this on your local council’s website or where the youth club is advertised, which may be in local newspapers or on social media.

27. Volunteer at a nursery or day care centre

Getting work experience at a nursery or day care centre may be a little more difficult for students as some voluntary positions may require you to be 18 or have certain childcare qualifications. However, some centres do offer work experience and volunteering positions that even younger students are able to do and to find these it is best to look for ones in your local area, check their websites and message them directly.

For example, Pioneer Childcare offers work experience for students even if in school or college. To learn more about this position and how to contact them to apply, check out this page on their website.

28. Volunteer at sports clubs or dance classes

Like many other work experience ideas on this list, how exactly you get this work experience will depend on your region and personal circumstance.

If you live in a region that has a directory of different sports clubs and classes, then you may be able to apply through this or get the contact details for how you’re supposed to apply otherwise. For an example of this, check out this page on the East Dunbartonshire Leisure and Culture Trust website.

If not the case, you can try to use your personal contacts, such as previous experience at a sports club or dance class or people you know that run one. Alternatively, you could search for clubs and classes in your local area and contact them directly to see if you can volunteer.

Media and publishing work experience ideas

To get into media production courses, students may need to already have some work experience in this field . Despite it being highly technical, there are several ways that you can do this.

Also, getting work experience in other areas in the media industry, such as journalism and publishing, can help to give you a better insight into these careers, even if you don’t need work experience in order to study it.

29. Get work experience at a local radio station

Get work experience at your local radio station or local hospital radio can be done by directly contacting them through their website, email or some other means. Please note that there may be an age limit.

For example, volunteering with the hospital radio at Royal Berkshire Hospital requires you to be at least 17, meaning that you may have the opportunity to do this work experience in Year 12 but won’t in Year 10. To learn more about this, check out this page on their website.

30. Do work experience at a local newspaper or magazine

Local newspapers and magazines are unlikely to directly advertise a work experience position. However, if you contact them directly, you can ask if doing a work shadowing placement would be possible.

Depending on the school you go to, you may be able to volunteer with your school’s newspaper or newsletter. While on a much smaller scale, this work experience could even prove to be better as it would be much more hands-on.

If neither of these options are possible, you can get work experience in journalism online . For example, Springpod have a journalism work experience programme that features speakers from BBC News and The Financial Times. To learn more about this, check out this page on Springpod’s website.

31. Work for an online newspaper or magazine

If you’re interested in journalism or other writing jobs, this work experience can be vital in order to develop your own skills. There are many different positions available, and you’ll need to choose which one suits you best.

For example, here at Think Student, students are given the opportunity to write articles and gain experience in this field , which you can learn more about here .

Other options include Shout Out UK, an online newspaper run by young people. It focuses on politics, but articles may also be about pop culture and trends or social media. You can learn more about this on their website here .

For more on where you can get work experience by writing for an online newspaper or magazine, check out this article by The Guardian.

32. Get work experience at a television studio

Unfortunately, getting direct work experience at a television studio will generally require students to be at least 18. Opportunities of this kind are offered by companies such as ITV , Tiger Aspect and Endemol Shine UK , which you can find more about by clicking on their respective links.

However, you can still get television work experience with online work experience schemes . For example, Channel 4 runs their 4Skills programme for students aged 16 or above. To learn more about this programme, check out this page on the 4Skills website.

33. Get work experience at a publishing company

Getting work experience in a publishing company can once again be quite difficult for younger students as many will want you to be at least 18. For example, Penguin Random House and the independent publisher, Slightly Foxed , both have work experience programmes for over 18s, which you can learn about by clicking on their respective links.

However, if you directly contact a smaller publishing firm, they may be able to accept you as a volunteer or for a work experience placement . To learn more about this, check out this article by The Publishing Training Centre.

English literature and language work experience ideas

Work experience related to English language and literature is everywhere. After all, English is essential for jobs, as without communication, there would be havoc!

Therefore, strengthening your English skills will impress any employer . However, if you want to discover work experience ideas more specific to English, check out the list below:

34. Volunteer at a library

If you just call up a local library and ask if you can volunteer, most librarians will be ecstatic! After all, being a library volunteer is not all just about stacking books!

You could help organise events such as creative writing workshops, which would help develop your English writing skills. You could also help deal with the digital aspects of the library, after all, the younger generation is often better at this. You can discover more if you check out this article from Volunteer Work Near Me.

35. Work for the local paper

Working at the local paper would definitely help improve your writing skills. It would also help you learn more about your local community!

If you are interested in writing non-fiction, consider calling up your local newspaper and asking if they would have you. If you want to discover what you would actually do as a newspaper journalist, check out this article from Indeed.

36. Write online blogs

If you enjoy writing but just don’t know what to write about, why not consider writing about yourself! There is guaranteed to be plenty of people online who will enjoy reading about your life.

This is especially true if you write creatively and make your pieces especially entertaining! This may not seem like work experience. However, from writing blogs, you would be developing the essential skills needed by a writer.

37. Shadow employers at an editing house

If you dream about becoming a editor someday, it may be worth gaining some experience in their place of work to see what they do. It would also increase your knowledge of the different literature out there!

You could phone up any local editing houses to ask them if they would consider taking you on. If not, you could always find other ways of editing, such as assisting with the school newspaper.

Check out this article from Indeed if you want to discover how to become an editor.

38. Shadow someone with a role in the media

This could be shadowing someone in a radio show or someone who works for a magazine company. Regardless, you could be improving your verbal and written English skills.

It will be beneficial if you contact companies which are based on roles that you are interested in. If you are given the opportunity to shadow, you will develop extremely useful skills!

39. Shadow at an advertising agency

The field of advertising requires individuals to have good English skills. This is because good catch phrases have to be created and words are carefully selected to accentuate the wonder of the chosen product!

If you know of a brand that is local to you, consider calling them up and asking if you could discover what it is like to advertise with them for the day. This is also a good choice if you have a competitive nature!

40. Shadow an ESL teacher

This is a teacher that teaches English as a second language to students. If you are interested in teaching and explaining the English language to someone, this could be a useful work experience choice.

If you want to discover more about what an ESL teacher actually is, check out this article from The TEFL Academy.

41. Become a proofreader

If you are one of those individuals who love to correct other people’s grammar, consider getting work experience as a proofreader! Not only will your grammar correcting skills increase, you will also be exposed to a wide range of different literature!

You could even just volunteer at charities to start with. To find out more about getting proofreading experience, check out this article from Chron.

Architecture, building and construction work experience ideas

If you want to study degree programmes, such as Architecture or Town and Country Planning, you may need to show off your work experience in your application. Although this will depend on the exact course you study and where you apply to, having work experience in this area can teach you a lot more about these industries, especially as it can be difficult to know what is actually involved in these types of careers.

42. Get work experience at an architecture firm

If you are interested in studying architecture, work experience with an architecture firm is something that will give your application a necessary boost. Some architecture firms offer work experience placements and so you can apply for these schemes on their websites. For example, Scott Brownrigg , DKA and BM3 all offer work experience placements for students, which you can learn more about by clicking on their respective links.

43. Get work experience at a construction company

To get work experience at a construction company, students will need to find construction companies that offer work experience and apply on their websites. For example, the BAM construction company offers work experience placements for school students. To learn more about this, check out this page on their website.

You may also be able to directly contact a construction company to see if they would be able to offer a work experience placement.

44. Get work experience with a town planning company

For Town and Country Planning degrees, you once again, may also need to have work experience. This can be done through a town planning company.

To get this work experience, you can research town planning companies in your area and see if they have work experience opportunities. After this, you may be able to apply directly on their website or email them to learn more about the position.

For example, if you’re 16 or over, you can apply to The Royal Town Planning Institute’s 1-week work experience programme. To learn more about this programme, check out this page by Pathway CTM.

45. Get work experience at your local estate agency

The real estate industry is quite closely linked to town and country planning. Due to this, getting work experience in real estate can help you to better understand the industry. In order to get experience with your local estate agency, you will generally need to contact them directly.

Some estate agents may have sections on their websites about work experience placements. For example, you can look at this page by Galliard Homes to learn more about their 2-week work experience placement for students.

Geography work experience ideas

Geography covers such a wide range of topics, such as the physical environment, issues in the world and even just how to use a map correctly! Consequently, there are many jobs which use geography.

It is just up to you to find them and research the ones which you would enjoy!

46. Volunteer at charities focused on looking after the environment

There are many charities in the UK focusing on saving the environment and fighting climate change. All you have to do is call up the charities you are interested in and get going with any volunteering opportunities!

You could take part in fundraising or action groups if you are interested in this aspect of geography. An example of a charity you could get involved in is called Friends of the earth and their website is found here .

47. Work experience at a planning and urban development company

If you shadow an individual who works in planning, you could see what the job entails first hand! You could also pick up new skills that may be required for the job and discover which type of planning interests you.

The Royal Town Planning Institute offers work experience opportunities. You can check out their website if you click here .

48. Shadow a geologist

Many geologists will only let university level students shadow them. However, if you specifically call up companies and ask them, you may be allowed!

This page from The Geologist’s Online Directory can help you search for companies close to you. As you won’t yet have necessary qualifications, you may just be conducting surveys. Regardless, any type of work experience will be beneficial to you.

49. Shadow a travel agent

If you are interested in the travelling side of geography, it may be worth seeing the life of a travel agent. You will need to have a good knowledge of the world and good problem-solving skills.

If you want to find out more about what the role of a travel agent is, check out this article from Indeed. If this interests you, call up your local travel agents to ask if you could shadow them.

50. Volunteer at a nature reserve

If you are passionate about conservation and preventing extinction, you could perhaps consider volunteering at a nature reserve! Not only would you be given the opportunity to garden, you could be involved in research and GPS tracking!

You could even organise wildlife watch groups . You can discover more about this if you check out this page from The Wildlife Trusts website.

51. Get work experience at your local news station

This may not sound related to geography; however it definitely is! You could get involved in the weather reporting which would be beneficial if you are interested in the physical and scientific parts of geography.

If your local news channel won’t allow you to join, you could still become an active Weather Watcher! You can find out what this means if you check out this article from the BBC.

52. Experience a placement at the British Geological Survey

The BGS offers placements to individuals under 18! Those who are selected are given the opportunity to work with scientists and gain a real insight into the world of geological research .

The work experience only lasts a week; however the opportunity would be incredible! You can discover how to apply and find out what is involved if you check out this article from their official website.

53. Volunteer at the DofE awards scheme

If you are a dab hand at orienteering, reading maps and compasses, this could be a great opportunity for you! This is because you could share your knowledge with others to help them navigate their routes during the DofE award scheme.

You can discover how to become a volunteer if you check out the DofE official website here.

STEM-related work experience ideas

Unless you want to become a scientist, a mathematician or a teacher, knowing what careers are available in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) can be difficult. Due to this, work experience can be a great way for you to learn more about it before committing to a degree, an apprenticeship or a job.

54. Get work experience with an accountancy firm

Accountancy may not be the first thing when you think of STEM. However, due to its mathematical basis, it can be a great career option for students who enjoy maths. Accounting degrees are another one of the degree programmes that may need you to have work experience.

First of all, if you meet the criteria, you may be eligible for the Access Accountancy work experience programme. This programme aims to level the playing field to allow students to get into accounting based on their own merits rather than background, which you can learn more about here on its website.

There is also the Explore BDO Insight Programme aimed at students in Year 11- 13, which you can learn more about on their website here . Otherwise, you can directly contact an accountancy firm to see what work experience positions they may have available for your age and expertise level .

55. Get work experience at a laboratory

If you’re interested in studying science or even pursuing a career in science, doing your placement at a laboratory can be a great way to get work experience. This may be done at a private laboratory or at the pathology laboratory at a hospital. For both of these options, students will need to apply through the website or as otherwise told.

Some opportunities include work experience at your local hospital, which you can learn more about on this page by NHS Gloucestershire Hospitals. As well as the National Nuclear Laboratory or NPL , to learn more about these work experience programmes, click on their respective links.

56. Do work shadowing at a vet clinic

If you’re interested in doing a Veterinary Medicine degree, getting work experience in this area can be an absolute must. The best way to get this experience is to find local vets in your area and contact them or apply through their website.

Some vets will already have work experience programmes and others may allow you to do a work shadowing placement. For example, Cerdarmount Veterinary Clinic in Bangor allows students to observe and learn about the processes involved in this field. To learn more about this opportunity, check out this page on their website.

57. Get work experience at a technology company

Working at a technology company can give you an insight into the vast range of jobs within the industry. Some technology companies offer specific work experience programmes aimed at students and young people .

For example, Cisco has a Pathway To Your Future Work Experience programme, aimed at either 14- 16-year-olds or 16- 18-year-old girls . To learn more about this programme, check out this page of their website.

58. Get involved in a research placement

If you’re in Year 12 and meet certain eligibility criteria, you may be able to undertake a research project. This programme is called Nuffield Research Placements and students are paired with a host organisation to do work experience in scientific research. To learn more about this and how you can get involved, check out the Nuffield Research Placements website, here .

59. Get work experience in aircraft engineering

This one sounds a little bit more vague and you may be wondering how exactly you would be able to get this kind of work experience. There are several ways you can go about this, such as getting this experience with an airline or an airport, who may offer this programme .

For example, British Airways has a work experience programme for engineering, that allows you to spend between 3 and 5 days with them. To learn more about this work experience opportunity, check out their website here .

Otherwise, you could do aircraft engineering work experience with the RAF . This work experience opportunity would similarly be about 5 days and would give students the opportunity to learn more about the role. To learn more about it, check out this guide by the RAF.

60. Get work experience with a car manufacturer

Getting work experience with a car manufacturer could allow you to gain a better understanding of the engineering and manufacturing processes involved. You may also be able to get work experience about business and project management side of the industries as well.

For example, Bentley provides both work experience and virtual work experience programmes aimed at students between the ages of 14 and 19. To learn more about these opportunities, check out this page on the Bentley careers website.

61. Do a STEM World Skills competition for work experience

If you’re interested in engineering or computing, this could be a great option for you if you’re in Year 12 or above.

To take part, you will need to be entered into the competition by your college or training provider so if you’re interested, it’s best to talk to them about this.

You can learn more about how it works here and more about the types of competition here both on the World Skills UK website.

62. Go to STEM university work experience summer schools

For STEM subjects, many different universities hold summer schools and other programmes. Some of these programmes, they are specifically designed as work experience opportunities.

For example, Imperial College London offers a Year 12 work experience programme in maths and scientific departments . You can learn more about it in this page on their website.

Also, the University of Sheffield offers a virtual work experience programme in physics . You can learn more about it here on their website.

63. Work shadow an electrician

Electricians don’t typically offer formal work experience programmes. However, instead you can try to arrange a work shadowing placement. This means that you will simply be observing an electrician as they work and have the opportunity to ask questions if need be.

To do this, you should directly contact electricians or firms in your local area to see if they would be willing to allow you to work shadow.

64. Work shadow a mechanic

There may be some mechanic work experience programmes. These are more likely to be done with a car manufacturer in their services department rather than a mechanic company.

For example, East Western Motor Group offers a work experience programme, that includes their after sales department. You can learn more about it on this page of their website.

However, you may also be able to arrange a work shadowing placement with a car mechanic by contacting them directly.

65. Work shadow the lab technicians at your school or college

In this role, you would be able to see how the lab technicians at your school or college set up practical experiments for different classes to do.

It’s best to start by talking to your form tutor, your head of year or your science teacher to get started. They should be able to tell you how this would work and what you need to do to be able to have this as your work experience.

66. Work shadow the IT support department at your school or college

A great way to get work experience in IT and computing is to do it through your school. This can be done by work shadowing the IT support department at your school.

To get this work experience, you should talk to your form tutor or your head of year first to see if this is even possible. From there, they should be able to tell you everything that you need to do to be able to do this work experience.

67. Get work experience at software development companies

This type of work experience can teach you more about this ever-growing industry and what careers are available.

This can be done through a company’s formal programme . For example, Softwire runs a 1-week work experience placement during the half term holidays. This is aimed at students between Year 10 and Year 13.

You can learn more about this by checking out this page on their website.

68. Get work experience in cybersecurity

You may decide to go down the virtual work experience route.  There are a range of options that will teach you more about the field of cybersecurity. You can learn more by checking out this article by Youth Employment.

Alternatively, you could apply to a company’s work experience programmes specifically cover cybersecurity. For example, Cisco’s Pathways work experience programme for Year 11s and Year 12s has some sessions on cybersecurity.

For more, check out this page on their website.

69. Get work experience at a science museum

In order to volunteer at a science museum, you may need to be over the age of 18. However, some science museums may also offer work experience placements, so it’s important to check before ruling this out entirely.

Once again, you’ll need to arrange this in a similar way to work shadowing. In this way, make sure you’ve clearly written asking about any work experience placements and included your CV.

70. Get work experience at an astronomical observatory

An astronomical observatory can be a great placement if you’re interested in astronomy and space sciences. This can teach you more about the work of an astronomer.

One work experience programme is the one at the Royal Observatory Greenwich. On this work experience, each student will have 1 week in August of placement alongside another student.

You can learn more about this by checking out this page on the Royal Museums Greenwich website.

71. Get work experience with Formula 1

If you’re interested in aerodynamics, mechanics or a related field, getting work experience within a Formula 1 team could be perfect for you.

To go about this, you will need to email the HR department to ask if they have any work experience available and when this is. It would be a good idea to include a CV and maybe even a cover letter when applying.

You can learn more about this on this page of the Formula Careers website.

72. Get work experience with the Met Office

If you’re interested in meteorology, getting work experience with the Met Office could be perfect. This work experience is open to young people between the ages of 13 and 18.

This type of work experience is virtual. However, you might be able to do in-person work experience after you have completed the virtual one.

You can learn more about this here on the Met Link website.

Psychology work experience ideas

It can be difficult to get work experience related to psychology. After all, you can’t go around scanning people’s brains and recording all of their different behaviours!

However, there are plenty of work experience opportunities which are directly or indirectly linked to psychology that you may never have thought of before!

73. Springpod virtual work experience

It is true that many professionals won’t allow you to shadow them due to patient confidentiality. Consequently, an alternative way of getting work experience in psychology is to sign up for some virtual work experience.

Springpod is an online platform which allows students to experience what different psychological professions are like . This includes being a sports psychologist, health psychologist and clinical psychologist.

You can find out more about Springpod virtual work experience if you check out their website here .

74. Shadow a mental health specialist

The NHS has two major services which support individuals with mental health issues, one for children and one for adults. You could call up your local mental health clinics to ask if you could shadow an employer there.

However, you need to be aware that this may not be possible due to client confidentiality . If this is the case, it could be arranged for you to be given the opportunity to have a chat with the mental health professionals.

75. Volunteer at a charity that supports mental health

There are many charities available that support individuals with mental health issues . You can volunteer in many different ways, such as working at a charity shop or helping to organise fundraising events.

You can find out more if you check out this article from the Mind website, which is a charity dedicated to supporting those individuals with mental health issues.

76. Shadow a psychologist or psychiatrist

If you happen to know a certain company of psychologists or psychiatrists, you should consider calling them up and asking them if they could offer you work experience!

However, when you are in the process of shadowing, you need to make sure that you are making the most out of the experience. Check out this article from the Physician Attorney Contract website if you want to discover how to do this.

77. Volunteer at a rehab centre

Volunteering at a rehab centre can be a difficult experience, as the individuals you will see may be struggling. However, it can also be a rewarding experience, as you could be responsible for setting up activities and making sure that the residents are as comfortable as possible .

An example of a rehab centre which accepts volunteers is the Recovery Focus group. You can find out more if you check out their website here .

78. Shadow a special educational needs teaching assistant

SEN teaching assistants help to support children with learning difficulties. They are often found in schools, so if you know that your school has one, there is no harm in asking if you can shadow them!

This could help you gain insight into the role and also learn about behavioural management, which is related to psychology. You can find out more about this and how work experience can help if you check out this article from ZEN Educate.

79. Mentor young offenders

If you are interested in forensic psychology, mentoring young offenders could be a good option. If you choose a good company, you will be specially trained to do this. The Trailblazers mentoring company offers useful opportunities. You can discover their website if you click here .

Mentoring young offenders will definitely help you stand out compared to other applicants!

80. Volunteer at brain injury support groups

If you are interested in neuropsychology and the impacts of brain injuries, this could be a good option for you! Headway is a UK charity which offers support groups to individuals with brain injuries.

You could be responsible for organising groups and events, posting leaflets or even just raising awareness about the devastating impacts of brain injuries. You can discover more about how you can help if you check out this page from Headway.

Artistic and creative industries work experience ideas

When thinking about artistic and creative subjects, it can be difficult to associate these with what jobs you can get with them. Other than the obvious, singer or actor, it can often feel as other job opportunities aren’t available for students who study arts subjects. Due to this, gaining work experience can be a useful way to gain a better understanding of what opportunities and careers exist in the arts.

81. Get work experience at a theatre

A work experience placement at a theatre can teach you about the different areas involved, such as the marketing or technical aspects. Due to there being so many different theatres, the policies of each will differ.

Some may require you to be 16 or 18, which is important to keep in mind when looking for this kind of work experience. Others will have specialised work experience programmes for students in Year 10 and 12 and surrounding ages .

For example, Cambridge Arts Theatre has a 1-week work experience programmes, which you can learn about here on its website. Students may need to apply for theatre work experience on the theatre’s website or by email.

82. Get work experience at a recording studio

A recording studio can be a great place for you to get work experience if you’re interested in music and music technology. This work experience may be offered by a recording studio itself or instead by another music organisation .

For example, Sound Gallery Studios offers a work experience placement to students aged 15- 19, which you can learn more about here on their website. Also, The Music Works, a music charity, offers work experience in music production and studio engineering, which you can learn more about on their website here .

83. Get work experience at an art gallery

Work experience at an art gallery can give students a better understanding of the different areas involved in this industry. Students can get this work experience by looking for voluntary work on the art gallery’s website or the wider organisations website.

There may be an age requirement of 16 or 18, depending on the organisation’s policies. For example, the National Portrait Gallery will need volunteers to be at least 16, although they do run some programmes for school-aged students. To learn more about this, check out this page on their website.

You can also look at this page by National Galleries of Scotland to learn more about the volunteering and work experience available.

84. Volunteer with a costume maker

If you’re interested in the arts as well as fashion, wardrobe work experience could be a great choice for you.

In order to get this kind of work experience, there are certain programmes. For example, there’s the Surrey Arts Wardrobe work experience, which you can learn more about this on this page of their website. As well as, the Punchdrunk work placement, which you can learn more about this on this page of their website.

85. Get work experience at a hairdresser’s or barber’s

Hairdresser’s and barber shops are often small businesses with a single store, and some may not even have a website. Due to this, the best way to try and secure work experience at a hairdresser’s or barber’s is to directly contact them either by email, phone or going into the shop directly.

86. Get work experience at a beauty salon

Getting work experience in the beauty industry can be difficult as there is often a limited number of places you can do it. Getting this experience by working in a beauty salon can be a great way to learn more about how the industry works and what is involved in the job of a beautician.

Like with a hairdresser’s or barber’s, students should directly contact a beauty salon near them to learn about work experience opportunities .

87. Shadow an interior designer

If you are interested in the art of designing houses, it may be useful to consider shadowing an interior designer . You would then gain experience designing houses and talking to a range of people, whilst trying to find out what they would really like.

Consider calling up some local interior designers and asking whether they would let you shadow them! You can discover more about the career of an interior designer as a whole if you check out this article from My World of Work.

88. Volunteer as a painter

If you are interested in sharing you own art with the world, you could just volunteer as a painter and create beautiful art pieces for people. This could help you create contacts and a reputation .

Alternatively, you could volunteer to paint individual’s walls, or even buildings, such as care homes. This could also boost your people skills. Consider being really creative when painting these walls, with the goal of making people smile.

Check out this article from Real Homes to discover some ideas.

89. Volunteer at an after-school club involving art

Normally, schools offer a range of after-schools clubs, based on all of the different subjects. If your school has an after-school club dedicated to art, consider volunteering at it!

You could help children younger than you reach their best potentials when painting and drawing. This would increase your experience with children as well as the subject of art.

90. Volunteer at crafts events

If you research crafts events in your local area, there is guaranteed to be a number of events that pop up! These could be based in churches, community centres or schools.

The art projects are bound to be simplistic, however with your expertise, you could help others create masterpieces. You could be exposed to a range of different crafts.

If you are interested in volunteering with art in general, check out this article from The Arts Society to discover opportunities.

91. Shadow a cake artist

If you are interested in the art of drawing on and decorating cakes, it may be a good idea to phone up your local bakery! You could shadow the cake designers there and discover how they produce the most flawless looking cakes .

Gaining work experience this way is especially beneficial, as you may be taught the exact skills to create the most intricate designs.

92. Gain experience at a graphics company

Getting work experience in graphic design would be extremely valuable to you, as so many industries require graphic designers! If you shadow a graphic designer, you could discover what skills are necessary for the job and what they actually do.

Gaining work experience in this career role could also mean that you can start to create a portfolio. This would be seen as impressive to potential employers. You could even do virtual work experience, as shown by Springpod if you click here .

93. Create your own video games

If you are more interested in coding and digital art, it may be worth considering creating your own video games! You could create beautiful designs and get others to play them and see what they think.

If possible, you could shadow video game designers to get the full experience of what their day-to-day job involves. If you want to discover how to become a fully qualified video game designer, check out this article from Indeed.

Sport work experience ideas

There are many work experience opportunities out there if you are interested in sports. This is the case for if you love to play sports, write about sports or even to just watch them!

Check out the list below to see how you can get involved in sports work experience.

93. Volunteer at a school sports club

You could potentially ask your P.E teachers to let you help out during sports clubs that they may run. It would be useful if you are good at the sport you are asking to volunteer at! It would also be beneficial for you to not mind working with kids!

You could then share your skills with individuals younger than you and show them how to excel at the sport they are playing.

94. Shadow a coach

If you really want to see how sports teams can be improved and are really passionate about a particular sport, consider shadowing a coach! You would then be able to discover the different techniques and strategies they use to help their team be successful .

Coaches will no doubt be happy with you offering extra help! You could call up local sports teams or even find out if your school offers clubs with coaches to get this role.

95. Shadow sporting commentators

If you are more interested in the media and documentation of sport, it may be useful to experience what it is like in a sports recording studio . You could watch how the sporting commentators describe and entertain.

Call up some local studios to get the ball rolling . You can check out what a sports commentator actually does if you check out this article from the National Careers Service.

96. Volunteer at a sports shop

If you are interested in the different types of sporting equipment and clothing, perhaps consider volunteering at a shop dedicated to selling sports items. This could be at a bike shop, a runner’s store or anything else you can think of!

Volunteering at a sports shop could increase your knowledge of sporting equipment and potentially even how to look after it.

97. Volunteer at sporting events

There are plenty of sporting events around the UK which you can definitely be apart of. This could be park runs, muddy sprints or even just social sports events!

Volunteering at these will not only give you experience of helping people with sport but also with talking to a range of new individuals. Check out this article from Sport England to discover how to get started.

98. Shadow a personal trainer

If you speak to your local gym and ask them if you could shadow a personal trainer, they may just let you! You could then see how the personal trainer interacts with clients and focuses on tailoring a workout to their specific goals.

However, you must always make sure that the client has given their consent! You can discover more about shadowing a personal trainer if you check out this article from Origym.

99. Create your own coaching plans

If shadowing a personal trainer isn’t possible but you are interested in helping people achieve their fitness goals, perhaps you could make your own coaching plans! You could do this for your friends and family at first – with their consent of course!

The experience will allow you to see what works and what doesn’t and give an insight into what it’s like to be a personal trainer!

100. Shadow individuals at a sports media company

If you are interested in sports journalism and media coverage, it may be useful to research and contact local companies dedicated to this . You could then see what the world of sports media coverage is like and discover whether it is really as exciting as watching the game!

You can discover the most popular sports websites on this article from FeedSpot if you want to get a feel for what sports articles sound like.

101. Volunteer as an umpire or referee

There are many independent sports clubs out there for kids who have shortages of umpires and referees! If you know a certain sport really well and think that you can manage a group of kids, consider doing this!

Call up some local clubs and ask them for permission and you could gain more experience with the sport and with working with children.

Business studies work experience ideas

In business there are so many different careers. However, it can be difficult to know what the differences between each of these are and more importantly which one would be right for you.

In the following sections, you’ll get to see a range of ideas to get work experience that can teach you more about all these careers and roles.

102. Work shadow at a marketing company or in the marketing department

Work shadowing in a marketing company or the marketing department of a company allows you to delve a little deeper into the business world. To get this type of work experience, you can directly contact marketing agencies that you’re interested in and ask if you can work shadow with them.

103. Work shadow in auditing

There are so many different aspects to business that it can be difficult to know how to get work experience in this field. One of the areas of business students don’t even know about is auditing.

In order to do auditing work experience, students can undertake a specialised programme . For example, KPMG runs a Black Heritage Talent Insight Programme in several areas of business, including auditing. You can learn more about this by checking out this page on their website.

104. Get work experience by starting your own business

In this day and age, more and more people, including students, are beginning to set up their own businesses. Setting up your own business can be a great idea to gain some work experience as it allows you to learn firsthand about entrepreneurship in a way that goes beyond what you just being told.

To get some ideas of what businesses you can start by yourself, without breaking the bank, check out this article by Save The Student.

105. Get virtual work experience in business

Physical opportunities, whether work shadowing or specifically made programmes, are often hard to come by.

With websites, such as Springpod, you can come across virtual work experience programmes in a variety of business areas. These include marketing and social media marketing, human resources and its functionality in business and even particular types of business, such as insurance.

Follow this link to find the Springpod website.

106. Work shadow in project management

Getting work experience in project management can be a great insight into a career that you just might be interested in.

This work experience can come with companies in specialised work experience programmes or even from your local authority. For example, Bristol City Council’s work experience placement offers a placement in project management. For more on this, check out this page on their website.

107. Work shadow in data analytics

For many students, the career paths in data, especially from a business perspective, aren’t very clear so getting work experience in this field can help to change that.

One example is the Microsoft data analytics consultancy firm, Purple Frog Systems. In this work experience placement, students would need to email the company to express their interest.

108. Get work experience in tax

When it comes to the more technical side of business, students are often unaware of what careers are out there. Getting a work experience placement that focuses on tax and similar themes can help you to better understand the importance of these in business.

For example, the EY’s Career Starters work experience programme focuses on tax and assurance as well as other more technical business areas . You can learn more about it on the EY website here .

109. Get work experience at an insurance firm

Another feature of business that’s often overlooked is insurance. This can once again feel confusing when it comes to relating it to potential future careers.

One programme in insurance that is offered to Year 12 students is by BMS Group. On this 2-week placement, students will be able to gain better insight into the insurance industry and careers available.

110. Get work experience in investment banking

If you’re interested in the financial and economical side of business, then an investment banking work experience placement could be a great way for you to learn more about this industry.

One of the programmes that you can look into is the Study Mind investment banking work experience programme. This is a 5-day programme that covers investment banking and other aspects of business. You can learn more about it on the Study Mind website here .

111. Get work experience in social media management

Social media has become such an important part of business to the extent that it has launched new types of jobs, including social media managers.

To get this type of work experience, you can start off by setting up your own social media management business or by working directly for a business, who needs this service. You could contact local businesses to see if you could voluntarily manage their social media accounts to enable you to get this experience.

112. Do a specialised business work experience programme with a company

Instead of just work shadowing or even just getting experience in a specific department, lots of companies have a specialised work experience programmes to enable students to get a taste of different areas of business that allows their company to function.

For example, there is the Deloitte’s Aspire work experience programme for Year 12s . You can click here to learn more about this programme on the Deloitte website.

113. Work shadow a sales representative

Getting work experience with a sales representative can help to show you exactly how this role works and the importance of sales in business. In order to get this work shadowing placement, it’s best to directly contact businesses . As before, you will most likely want to include a CV and explain exactly why you want to work shadow at that company.

Law work experience ideas

Breaking into law can be so, so competitive that having a bit of work experience to give you a boost can only help. However, knowing what kinds of work experience to get can be another dilemma.

In the following sections, you’ll see some work experience ideas that will enable you to learn more about careers in law and the legal system as a whole.

114. Get work experience at a law firm

Law work experience can be invaluable for applying to do a Law degree due to the sheer number of applicants that you need to stand out from. Getting formal law work experience can be more difficult if you’ve not yet start university, however some firms offer it.

For example, Pinsent Masons offers a Summer Legal School Work Experience programme to give you an insight into to the law industry. You can learn more about it here on their website.

115. Get work experience at a legal advice clinic

Another way to get work experience in law is to volunteer. Volunteering at a legal advice clinic can give you an insight into how law can come into people’s everyday lives.

In this voluntary role, you won’t be directly involved but you will have a chance to help with admin or social media presence. To learn more about this, check out this page on the Merseyside Law Centre website.

116. Observe court hearings

Watching court cases, counts as work shadowing as you are seeing how the roles in court work.

In order to do this, you can simply go to a court hearing that is open to the public and watch from the public gallery. Alternatively, you can watch remotely. Some courts, such as the Supreme Court stream their hearings online.

You can learn more about this by checking out this page on the government website.

117. Work shadow a paralegal

If you’re interested in law, then you’re probably familiar with the different types of lawyers, such as solicitors and barristers. However, there are other positions in the legal world that are still essential for it to function, such as a paralegal.

In order to work shadow a paralegal, you would need to contact the law firm and specifically state that you would want to see the work of a paralegal.

118. Work shadow a legal secretary

Another overlooked career in law is that of the legal secretary. Getting work experience with a legal secretary could be valuable as they are important to the ins and outs of the law firm.

Once again, in order to work shadow a legal secretary, you will need to contact the law firm and specifically state that you want to work shadow a legal secretary.

119. Get work experience at a barristers’ chambers

If you’re specifically interested in becoming a barrister, then getting work experience in chambers could be a great idea. These are mainly for Year 12 students and would allow them to work shadow and maybe take a more active role.

In order to get these kinds of work experience, you would apply on the chambers’ websit e. For example, you can look at this page by Old Square Chambers.

120. Participate in the bar mock trial competition

This is open to 15- to 18-year-olds and to enter into this competition, your school or college will need to sign up and pay the fee.

You should check if your school/ college already participates in this competition. If not, you may be able to talk to your school or college to see if they would be willing to start participating in this.

For more on this, check out this page on the Smart Law website.

121. Volunteer with youth justice services

To get this type of work experience, students should contact local volunteer agencies directly. This is because most voluntary roles in youth justice services will require the volunteer to be at least 18.

However, some local volunteering agencies may have positions available that are suitable for under 18s. You can learn more on this page of the Youth Justice Resource Hub.

History work experience ideas

Finding work experience can be difficult in general but when it comes to humanity subjects that can often be much worse. While history has some obvious contenders for both careers and work experience, it can be difficult to see beyond these.

In this section, we’ll take you through some of the best work experience ideas to give you a better understanding of careers in history.

122. Get work experience at a museum

If you’re interested in history, getting work experience at a museum can be a great way to learn more about the careers associated with this subject. You may be able to get this through a work experience scheme by a museum or university museum.

For example, the Natural History Museum’s work experience programme allows students in Year 10 and above to spend the week learning about a specific area of museum work. To learn more about this and how you can get involved, check out this page on their website.

123. Get work experience at an archive

Another history-focused career that you can get work experience in is that of an archivist. In this work experience, you can learn about how documents are preserved and cared for.

The National Archives’ work experience placement lasts 5 days and is aimed at students between the ages of 14 and 18. To learn more about this and how to get involved, check out this page on The National Archives’ website.

124. Get work experience in heritage conservation

Another feature of the history industry is heritage conservation. In this area, it’s important to learn about the careers and opportunities involved on work experience as these are often not talked about.

One volunteering scheme that allows you to get work experience is the English Heritage volunteering scheme. With this there are a range of opportunities from gardening to supporting visitors. You can learn more about this on the English Heritage website here.

125. Volunteer with a Council of British Archaeology group or young archaeologists club

Included in the area of history is archaeology and as this isn’t generally taught in schools, getting work experience in this field can be incredibly enlightening. To get said work experience, you could volunteer with a Council for British Archaeology group or a Young Archaeologists’ club. For more on these, check out this page and this page on their respective website.

126. Get work experience with a historical costume maker

Some costume makers and historic dress restorers offer volunteering and internship placements for students. This can give students interested in textiles and design a great opportunity for work experience.

For example, The Tudor Tailor offers work experience for students of different ages and experience levels. Due to this, the nature and the length of the placement may also vary. To learn more about this and how to get involved, check out this page on their website.

127. Get work experience with a tour guide

There are a range of historic tours that take place throughout the UK. Work shadowing on these could enable you to learn more about how history is taught in a non-academic setting.

In order to get this work experience, students will need to directly contact historic tour guide companies as they won’t generally have work experience programmes.

128. Get work experience at historical buildings

It’s best to contact these organisations via their website or by email to learn more. At time of writing (November 2023), the Historic Royal Palaces are updating their work experience programme, so it is not currently available. You can learn more about this by checking out this page on their website.

129. Volunteer with the War Memorials Trust

With this work experience, you would either be contributing to the War Memorials Trust website, or you would be committing at least half a day per week in an office-based setting in London. You can learn more about this volunteering scheme by checking out this page on the War Memorials Trust website.

130. Get virtual history work experience

Particularly with very academic subjects, finding work experience that’s right for you can be hard to come across. However, with virtual work experience, you have the opportunity to go at your own pace and to learn in greater depth.

One programme available for history is ‘Careers in Heritage with Historic England’ programme. You can learn more about it on this page of the Historic England website.

Foreign languages work experience ideas

Foreign languages subjects tend not to be very popular options for GCSEs or A-Levels. Thus, the careers involved tend not to be as commonly talked about as others.

Finding foreign languages work experience ideas can be difficult but don’t worry. In the following sections, you will see a range of different ideas for languages work experience to help you learn more about the industries involved.

131. Get work experience at a translation agency

If you’re interested in languages and want to pursue a language-related career, getting work experience at a translation company can be a great way to learn more about what you can do with languages. Work experience placements allow students to shadow professionals in translation companies in different departments.

If you study German and are in Year 12 or above, you could get a 1-week work experience placement with AST Language Services. To learn more about this opportunity, check out this page on their website.

132. Get work experience at an embassy

When it comes to foreign languages international relations and diplomacy can be a great route to go down.

In order to get this work experience, it’s best to directly contact the embassy that you’re interested in doing work experience or work shadowing at. Applying with a CV and maybe even a cover letter will once again set a good precedent and make you more likely to get a position.

133. Volunteer in foreign language classes

Getting work experience at your own school, college or sixth form can be a great idea as it can be easier to arrange. This especially applies when it comes to modern languages work experience as this can be hard to get.

In order to get this work experience, it is probably best to first talk to your language teacher and then to check how this would work with your head of year and/ or your form tutor.

134. Volunteer at a language school

Teaching English as a foreign language is fairly common for foreign language graduates. Getting some work experience in this industry can help you to decide if it is something that you would be interested in.

There are many different schools where students go to learn English. You could volunteer in one of these.

For example, the Ealing Community School of English is run entirely by volunteers. You can learn more about this by checking out this page on their website.

135. Volunteer at a language club

There are often language clubs or even language cafes on in the local community. Even without having fluent language skills, you could volunteer with one of these.

Without being fluent, you obviously won’t be teaching the class. However, you could help when it comes to setting up or cleaning.

However, it’s important to note that this will fully depend on where it is that you’re volunteering with. Although, it would be a good start to search at local community centres.

136. Get work experience at tourist information centres

Tourist information centres once again give you the chance to go into travel and tourism with your language skills.

While there are no formal work experience programmes that I could find. You can always directly contact your local tourist information centre and see if there’s anything available for you to do as work experience.

137. Get work experience at an airport

Getting work experience in an airport can be great if you want to go down the travel and tourism route and put your language skills to use in this way.

In order to get this work experience, there are a range of programmes. For example, ones at Bristol Airport, linked here from their website, and London City Airport, linked here from their website. However, these will often be dependent on where you live.

138. Get work experience abroad

You would most likely need to do this type of work experience in the holidays to make it easier to do. In order to get this work experience, it’s best to apply for a programme where you find it, whether this is a particular agency or a specific programme.

However, there are 2 main issues: cost and safety. Thus, it’s important to take this into consideration when finding a work experience placement abroad.

139. Participate in Model UN for work experience

Model UN doesn’t sound like an actual form of work experience. However, it is actively teaching you about the United Nations and careers in international relations and it allows you to develop transferable skills in a similar way to work experience.

In order to participate, students will need to search through organisers, who run Model UN conferences . This can be done through online or using your school’s contacts.

For more on this, check out this page on the UN website.

Religious studies work experience ideas

When it comes to religious studies, it can be incredibly difficult to think about which careers these link to let alone how you should go about getting work experience in these areas. The following sections will give you some ideas of work experience ideas directly related to religious studies.

140. Volunteer at a place of worship

To find where to do this work experience, you should look up places of worship in your area and try to find the contact details of these. You may even be able to find a website with which you can send a message through.

When contacting them, make sure that you clearly state your purpose (to do work experience), the dates you want to do it and maybe even include your CV as well.

141. Work shadow your religious studies teacher

You can talk to your religious studies teacher and your school to see if you can do your work experience placement at school by helping out in other religious studies classes.

A religious studies teacher is still a viable option if you’re interested in taking religious studies or theology further on. Thus, this work experience can give you an insight into this career path from the other side, which you’re not normally used to.

142. Volunteer at religious organisations

Many places of worship also run other organisations. These typically include food banks but can also be charity shops and other community-centred things. This can enable you to get practical work experience into how religious studies can be looked at from a community setting.

As these once again operate on a local level, you will need to directly contact these types of religious organisations to see how you can volunteer with them and whether this would be possible at all.

143. Get work experience at religious shops

Depending on where you live, there might be a primarily religious shop. These may come in the form of bookstores, clothing stores or other kinds of shops that sell religious items, such as prayer mats or even rosary beads.

Once again, these shops will operate on a local level. Due to this, you’ll once again have to try and find out whether you can volunteer with them buy directly contacting any religious shop that is in your local area.

144. Volunteer at religious events

To get work experience for religious studies, you could volunteer at one of these events. This might be in the form of helping to set up tables or even being a stagehand or maybe something else entirely.

What religious events are held will once again depend on your area and so you will need to look it up. The same applies here as you will need to make your intentions clear and should consider including your CV.

Other work experience ideas

Some work experience ideas don’t quite fit into the categories above yet are still quite specific in the industry that they exist in. If you’re interested in law, working with animals, public services, history, politics or languages then the following ideas might just be for you.

145. Get work experience at a zoo

Zoos may offer work experience programmes for Year 10 and Year 12 students. These can allow you to gain a better understanding of what is involved, such as animal care and animal conservation.

Depending on the programme and the zoo that offers it, there may be specific eligibility requirements. For example, London Zoo offers their work experience programme to students from disadvantaged backgrounds in Camden and Westminster. To learn more about this, check out this page on their website.

146. Volunteer at an animal shelter

If you’re interested in animal welfare and caring for animals, then you could also choose to get work experience by working at an animal shelter or sanctuary. In this role, you would be working with different animals and learning more about caring for them.

For example, in a work experience placement with Oxfordshire Animal Sanctuary, you would be working with the rabbits and cats and mainly focused on cleaning. To learn more about this, check out this page on their website.

147. Get work experience on a farm

Getting work experience on a farm could help you to learn more about animal care and management. You could be given practical experience and taught about the health and safety procedures involved .

There may be an age restriction involved, depending on the farm and its policies. For example, on Surrey Docks Farm, you need to be at least 14 for a weekday placement and at least 18 for a weekend placement. To learn more about this, check out this page on their website.

148. Get work experience with your local police force

Depending on your region, your local police station may offer a work experience placement. T his will give you an overview of the different roles and situations police officers deal with daily and give you an insight as to how the force functions as a whole.

Some programmes may need you to get parental permission, if you’re under 18 and most will likely need you to go through a vetting process . To learn more about getting work experience in the police force, check out this page by Kent Police.

149. Get work experience with your local council

Getting work experience with your local council can be a great option for students interested in politics as it teaches you about how local government works in a practical way. There are a wide variety of departments involved in local councils, meaning that your placement may vary depending on which department you’re positioned with.

For example, with Three Rivers District Council, you can choose which service to do the experience with. This might include housing, facilities management and culture and play services. To learn more about how to get involved in this, check out this page on their website.

150. Get work experience at a bank

Work experience at a bank can be great for students interested in finance or economics. Large banks may offer specific work experience programmes for young people to give them an insight into the industry.

For example, HSBC offer weeklong work experience opportunities for UK students in Year 9 to Year 13. To learn more about this programme, check out this page on their website.

*Information in this article to do with which degrees require work experience has been taken from this UCAS guide .

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OpenAI teases an amazing new generative video model called Sora

The firm is sharing Sora with a small group of safety testers but the rest of us will have to wait to learn more.

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OpenAI has built a striking new generative video model called Sora that can take a short text description and turn it into a detailed, high-definition film clip up to a minute long.

Based on four sample videos that OpenAI shared with MIT Technology Review ahead of today’s announcement, the San Francisco–based firm has pushed the envelope of what’s possible with text-to-video generation (a hot new research direction that we flagged as a trend to watch in 2024 ).

“We think building models that can understand video, and understand all these very complex interactions of our world, is an important step for all future AI systems,” says Tim Brooks, a scientist at OpenAI.

But there’s a disclaimer. OpenAI gave us a preview of Sora (which means sky in Japanese) under conditions of strict secrecy. In an unusual move, the firm would only share information about Sora if we agreed to wait until after news of the model was made public to seek the opinions of outside experts. [Editor’s note: We’ve updated this story with outside comment below.] OpenAI has not yet released a technical report or demonstrated the model actually working. And it says it won’t be releasing Sora anytime soon. [ Update: OpenAI has now shared more technical details on its website.]

The first generative models that could produce video from snippets of text appeared in late 2022. But early examples from Meta , Google, and a startup called Runway were glitchy and grainy. Since then, the tech has been getting better fast. Runway’s gen-2 model, released last year, can produce short clips that come close to matching big-studio animation in their quality. But most of these examples are still only a few seconds long.  

The sample videos from OpenAI’s Sora are high-definition and full of detail. OpenAI also says it can generate videos up to a minute long. One video of a Tokyo street scene shows that Sora has learned how objects fit together in 3D: the camera swoops into the scene to follow a couple as they walk past a row of shops.

OpenAI also claims that Sora handles occlusion well. One problem with existing models is that they can fail to keep track of objects when they drop out of view. For example, if a truck passes in front of a street sign, the sign might not reappear afterward.  

In a video of a papercraft underwater scene, Sora has added what look like cuts between different pieces of footage, and the model has maintained a consistent style between them.

It’s not perfect. In the Tokyo video, cars to the left look smaller than the people walking beside them. They also pop in and out between the tree branches. “There’s definitely some work to be done in terms of long-term coherence,” says Brooks. “For example, if someone goes out of view for a long time, they won’t come back. The model kind of forgets that they were supposed to be there.”

Impressive as they are, the sample videos shown here were no doubt cherry-picked to show Sora at its best. Without more information, it is hard to know how representative they are of the model’s typical output.   

It may be some time before we find out. OpenAI’s announcement of Sora today is a tech tease, and the company says it has no current plans to release it to the public. Instead, OpenAI will today begin sharing the model with third-party safety testers for the first time.

In particular, the firm is worried about the potential misuses of fake but photorealistic video . “We’re being careful about deployment here and making sure we have all our bases covered before we put this in the hands of the general public,” says Aditya Ramesh, a scientist at OpenAI, who created the firm’s text-to-image model DALL-E .

But OpenAI is eyeing a product launch sometime in the future. As well as safety testers, the company is also sharing the model with a select group of video makers and artists to get feedback on how to make Sora as useful as possible to creative professionals. “The other goal is to show everyone what is on the horizon, to give a preview of what these models will be capable of,” says Ramesh.

To build Sora, the team adapted the tech behind DALL-E 3, the latest version of OpenAI’s flagship text-to-image model. Like most text-to-image models, DALL-E 3 uses what’s known as a diffusion model. These are trained to turn a fuzz of random pixels into a picture.

Sora takes this approach and applies it to videos rather than still images. But the researchers also added another technique to the mix. Unlike DALL-E or most other generative video models, Sora combines its diffusion model with a type of neural network called a transformer.

Transformers are great at processing long sequences of data, like words. That has made them the special sauce inside large language models like OpenAI’s GPT-4 and Google DeepMind’s Gemini . But videos are not made of words. Instead, the researchers had to find a way to cut videos into chunks that could be treated as if they were. The approach they came up with was to dice videos up across both space and time. “It’s like if you were to have a stack of all the video frames and you cut little cubes from it,” says Brooks.

The transformer inside Sora can then process these chunks of video data in much the same way that the transformer inside a large language model processes words in a block of text. The researchers say that this let them train Sora on many more types of video than other text-to-video models, varied in terms of resolution, duration, aspect ratio, and orientation. “It really helps the model,” says Brooks. “That is something that we’re not aware of any existing work on.”

“From a technical perspective it seems like a very significant leap forward,” says Sam Gregory, executive director at Witness, a human rights organization that specializes in the use and misuse of video technology. “But there are two sides to the coin,” he says. “The expressive capabilities offer the potential for many more people to be storytellers using video. And there are also real potential avenues for misuse.” 

OpenAI is well aware of the risks that come with a generative video model. We are already seeing the large-scale misuse of deepfake images . Photorealistic video takes this to another level.

Gregory notes that you could use technology like this to misinform people about conflict zones or protests. The range of styles is also interesting, he says. If you could generate shaky footage that looked like something shot with a phone, it would come across as more authentic.

The tech is not there yet, but generative video has gone from zero to Sora in just 18 months. “We’re going to be entering a universe where there will be fully synthetic content, human-generated content and a mix of the two,” says Gregory.

The OpenAI team plans to draw on the safety testing it did last year for DALL-E 3. Sora already includes a filter that runs on all prompts sent to the model that will block requests for violent, sexual, or hateful images, as well as images of known people. Another filter will look at frames of generated videos and block material that violates OpenAI’s safety policies.

OpenAI says it is also adapting a fake-image detector developed for DALL-E 3 to use with Sora. And the company will embed industry-standard C2PA tags , metadata that states how an image was generated, into all of Sora’s output. But these steps are far from foolproof. Fake-image detectors are hit-or-miss. Metadata is easy to remove, and most social media sites strip it from uploaded images by default.  

“We’ll definitely need to get more feedback and learn more about the types of risks that need to be addressed with video before it would make sense for us to release this,” says Ramesh.

Brooks agrees. “Part of the reason that we’re talking about this research now is so that we can start getting the input that we need to do the work necessary to figure out how it could be safely deployed,” he says.

Update 2/15: Comments from Sam Gregory were added .

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