Typing Lessons

Take a typing speed test, learn to type faster and with fewer errors with this free online typing tutor.

Speed Typing Online

Free Online Typing Tutor

How to learn to type:, no looking at your keyboard.

This is important - don't do it!

Touch typing is a skill that uses muscle memory to know where the keys are without the sense of sight. You can't learn to swim without getting wet; likewise, you can't learn to touch type by looking down at the keyboard. It might be hard at first but hang in there, and in no time it will become so natural you'll forget the keyboard is even there!

Technique and Accuracy First

Concentrate on correct form (using the right fingering, etc.) and accuracy above all else.

Typing Tutor Features

Multiple lesson formats.

Two different typing lesson formats give you more options to choose how you like to learn:

- Classic Lessons

There is a reason why these repetitive lessons are so common: they work really well for those just starting to learn touch-typing.

For those just starting to learn touch-typing try these - they work!

- Advanced Lessons

These lessons are for those who might already have a basic understanding of the keyboard and need a quicker refresher or maybe learn some of the rarer keys better.

Advanced lessons are designed to move quicker through learning the keys while also introducing words instead of random letters.

Try both types of lessons to find the one you like best. Or, for best results, complete both sets!

Multiple Lesson Lengths

The lesson length dropdown (under the method tabs in the left sidebar) allows you to customize the length of each lesson.

Set target speed and accuracy

Now you have the ability to set typing goals for your typing lessons! Simply set the typing speed and accuracy you would like to achieve and the typing tutor will track your progress, letting you know which lessons you have completed and which ones you should repeat to achieve your goals.

As you improve and increase your target speed and accuracy, the tutor will automatically suggest lessons you should work on next!

Custom Lessons

Sometimes there are just a few keys you can't seem to remember. Simply enter the characters you wish to practice more in the left toolbar and click "Go!" to create a custom lesson for these keys, generated into random "words."

Restart Typing Lesson Hotkey

Keep your hands on the keyboard - use keyboard shortcut "Shift-Return" to restart the typing lesson to help you concentrate and keep your hands in the home position where they belong.

Practice Frequently!

This free online typing tutor was designed to help you learn to type as fast and easy as possible. Try a few lessons a day and you'll start to notice your fingers naturally move to the right keys. Even if it seems at times that you are making no improvement, keep on working at it and you will learn to type without looking! Remember to take breaks often though - its good for the body and for the learning!

Classic Lessons

Advanced lessons, custom lesson.

Enter characters:

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Learn touch typing with TypeLift

Easily practice your typing skills free and online and improve your typing speed.

Practice now *

* Just try it. No hidden costs and no login required.

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Improve your typing speed online

TypeLift is a free touch typing courseware running directly in your browser. It assists you to practice your keyboard skills efficiently and therefore increase your typing speed immensely.

typing lessons keyboard

Typing test

How fast can you type? Take our typing test and check your current typing speed.

typing lessons keyboard

Learn to type

Learn the fundamentals on how to practice efficiently and type faster by using all 10 fingers.

typing lessons keyboard

Choose from a variety of free typing lessons and practice your typing skills gradually.

typing lessons keyboard

Follow your progress by keeping an eye on your latest results and your long-term improvements.

Type faster with ease

There are many typing tutors out there. Why should I choose TypeLift?

Accessibility

TypeLift is for free and running in your browser without installation. Just open the URL in your browser and get started. You don’t even have to register. As a local user your results will be stored directly in your browser.

Comparability

Taking the Typing test you can figure out your current typing speed, observe your typing practice improvements in the long run and as a registered user, even compare your skills to others!

We have typing lessons for everybody. The first warm ups and finger exercises, learning new keys, and typing words which really matter in your language. In addition as registered user you can create up to 10 custom typing lessons to focus on your individual needs.

Smart and dynamic

The typing lessons of TypeLift are not just static content. Every time you start a typing practice the lessons are assembled dynamically to increase your learning effect and to avoid memorizing frequently practiced exercises. On top of that our smart error analysis repeats frequent mistakes while you practice to make your individual training even more efficient.

Virtual keyboard

TypeLift provides a visual keyboard to help you learn to type in a quick and simple way. Coloured keys show you the right finger-key-combinations and the basic positions. Visual markers show you how to reach every key on your keyboard. So you don’t have to search on your „real“ keyboard anymore from the start. However, advanced users can disable settings on the visual keyboard to improve their personal learning curve.

Of course you won’t learn to type over night – you have to practice! This is why it’s so important that you can measure even your small improvements to stay motivated and keep practicing. Thanks to our statistics you can analyze your performance in every detail, reveal your weak spots and specifically work on them.

Start a free typing practice

There’s no excuse to not start today! Everybody can use TypeLift and it’s for free! Just try it and see for yourself.

Show typing lessons

Pro version of our typing tutor

TypeLift Pro

With the new Pro version you have access to more great features that boost your typing practice. See for yourself:

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13 Best Free Typing Lessons for Kids and Adults

The top free keyboarding lessons online

typing lessons keyboard

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These free typing lessons will teach you how to type and improve your speed and accuracy. They're geared toward every age group and situation, and all have different features that make them great and unique.

After you've built up some skills with these lessons, try out some free typing games for practice. Then you'll be ready for free WPM tests to evaluate your speed.

Track Your Progress: Typing.com

Track progress with points and achievements.

Registration isn't required.

Good for beginners.

Advanced users won't improve their skills much.

Typing.com has free typing lessons for beginner, intermediate, and advanced typists. It's geared towards middle school kids all the way up to adults. You can jump to any practice level that you want, at any time.

During each lesson, there's nothing else to distract you from your typing except for a virtual keyboard showing where the letters are and which fingers to use. When done, you get to see your speed, accuracy, and the time it took you to finish, and you don't even need to lift your hands off the keyboard to move on to the next lesson; just press Enter .

Free registration isn't required, but with it, you can track your progress and earn awards.

There's a Teacher's portal available for educators to manage and track the progress of their students as they complete lessons.

Hundreds of Lessons: TypingClub

Over 600 lessons.

Take placement tests or learn in order.

Customize the theme and other settings.

Tools for teachers to design lessons.

Free version has ads.

Can't skip intro videos.

There are hundreds of typing lessons at TypingClub, where you'll learn the alphabet keys, shift key, numbers, and symbols. There are also lessons that focus especially on speed. You can jump to any of them whenever you like, or you can take placement tests to prove your skills.

While you go through these, you'll be able to view your speed and accuracy. If you sign up for a free account, you can keep track of your progress, record your highest WPM of all time, and review some other stats.

Teachers can monitor their students' progress, customize the lessons, and even manage multiple classes.

There's a paid edition that has additional features and no ads.

Improve on Difficult Keys: TypingTest.com

Highlights keys you struggle with.

Includes a course, tests, and games.

Lots of ads.

TypingTest.com has typing tests and courses, so it's perfect for experienced and new typists. However, the main feature I want to call out is called Tricky Keys.

I struggle with certain letters, like X, that I don't have to type often. With this website, I can choose that letter, or any letter, to practice relevant words.

If you're not sure what your tricky keys are, there's a short typing test you can take. When you're finished, you're told which keys you need more help with, and it's then easy to start practicing them right here on this website.

Generate Your Own Lessons: Keybr

Lots of customizable settings.

Supports several keyboard layouts.

Lets you skip learning really short words.

Add your own words to the lessons.

The website has ads.

It's too much if you're not interested in customizations.

This is the website for typing lessons if you want total control over what you're typing and how you learn.

For example, you can set a target WPM, set up more letters to unlock as you progress through lessons, include uppercase letters and punctuation, and set the total time you want to spend learning to type every day.

I also love that I can toggle off certain typing options that I can't normally control in a typing lesson. The settings include a toggle to stop the cursor on errors and another to forgive errors; you can change these at any time. Even the whitespace, cursor shape, cursor movement, and sounds can be adjusted.

This is truly the perfect website for customizing how you learn to type. It's also ideal if you like a little competition; all the fastest typists compete for high scores. There's also a racing game that tests your typing skills.

Learn in Order: Ratatype

Several typing tips.

15 typing lessons.

Clean and modern design.

Has a game mode.

Requires a free user account.

Can't skip ahead to advanced lessons.

There are over a dozen free typing lessons at Ratatype, and before starting them, you're given several tips for how to sit at your computer, which is something most of these sites pass over.

Something unique about this keyboarding lesson website is that if you make too many mistakes during a lesson, you're forced to start over. Once you make a reasonable amount of typos, or none at all, you can move forward with more lessons.

You get to see your typo count and WPM while you're typing, and even compete with others in a high score list.

Set Your Own Goals: Speed Typing Online

Set custom goals.

Games are simple and clear.

Create custom lessons using any letters.

Two display options.

More for beginners than advanced users.

Must register to save or access lessons.

Speed Typing Online has 17 classic lessons that include learning all the letters on the keyboard and then testing your skills through reviews. Then you can move on to the advanced lessons, where you start stringing those letters together to make words. 

There are sets of lessons for just the top row, home row, and bottom row, or you can type using the whole keyboard. Every result you see on these typing lessons can be shared via a special URL so that you can show off your score.

Something else I like is that the length of each lesson can be changed. I like to do the short lessons when I have little time but still want to practice, but there are other lengths, including extra long .

If you register (it's free) you'll be able to keep track of your progress and set custom goals. You'll also get access to free typing tests and games. 

Lessons for Kids: Dance Mat Typing

Introduction is good for beginners.

Fun learning tool for young children.

No need to register.

Voiceover accents may be difficult for some to understand.

Not as useful for adults or intermediate to advanced users.

Dance Mat Typing uses wacky animal characters and colorful games to make their free typing lessons fun for elementary-aged children.

You're taken through four levels, each with three different stages. This helps break the lessons into small, manageable chunks so that learning to type isn't so overwhelming.

No registration or login is required, so you can start right away.

Enter Your Own Text: Sense-Lang.org

Training on a variety of keyboard styles.

Tools to create online lessons.

Choose from two display modes.

You can set the lesson's length (in letters).

Lessons are short; moderately skilled typists will exhaust them quickly.

Displays distracting ads.

Sense-Lang.org has 16 free typing lessons, along with a feature that allows you to use your own text to practice.

Each lesson features an animated keyboard, making it easy to get a visual on how you should be typing and what you need to do to make fewer mistakes. You also get real-time typing stats for your WPM, time, and accuracy during the lessons.

Teachers can create online classes, assign lessons, and get updates on the progress of their students. They're available in several languages and for international keyboards as well.

Perfect for Adults Learning to Type: GCFGlobal

Animated videos are simple and helpful.

Site is clean and easy to use.

Can't fast forward or rewind videos.

Not designed for young children.

GCFGlobal has free typing lessons that are geared towards adults with no or little typing skills. For each lesson, you have the option of learning the keys or jumping right into practicing them.

It's a great program to start out on, but since they don't give you an update on how fast or accurate you're typing, we suggest moving on to another site after you get the basic skills down.

Start From Scratch: Turtle Diary

Registration isn't necessary.

Lots of lessons.

Ideal for any skill level.

Several website ads.

Typing is naturally interrupted because you can't fix your mistakes.

This is another website that lets you learn how to type in order, from the very beginning. To give you an idea of what that means: the very first task in the first lesson has you type the letters j and f over and over.

The good thing is that this isn't just geared toward kids or adults new to typing. There are 51 total typing lessons here, categorized as beginner, intermediate, and advanced lessons. If you go in order, you'll type a couple letters only and then move on to uppercase letters and symbols, short paragraphs, and finally a combination of everything.

Like most of these sites, during each typing lesson, you can monitor your typing speed, accuracy, and time. The hands you see over the keyboard can be toggled on and off easily at any time.

There are also multiplayer typing games that help you put into use what you've learned.

Lessons for Non-English Keyboards: Touch Typing Study

Extremely large number of keyboard languages offered.

Real-time WPM speed rating.

Dated and busy user interface.

No video or audio instruction; text instructions have minimal visual aids.

Touch Typing Study has 15 free typing lessons available in many languages and keyboard layouts, plus some games and speed tests.

Each lesson is broken down into topics so that you can easily see what's coming next or skip to another section if you feel confident in your skills.

While you're typing, you'll be able to view your errors, speed, and time spent on the lesson.

Easy on the Eyes: Big Brown Bear

Displays a single scrolling sentence instead of paragraphs.

Move to the next level when you meet goals.

No registration necessary.

Includes guides and stats that you can toggle off.

Progress halts until you press the correct key.

Big Brown Bear has over a dozen free typing lessons that take you through the process of learning all the keys on the keyboard. Just pick which letter to be reviewed on to get started

Something we like about this website is how the words come across the screen. Instead of seeing them as a paragraph like you normally would when reading, the words are on a single line, and they pass through the center of the screen so that you don't have to move your eyes.

However, with these lessons, you must correct your mistakes before you can continue typing, which may or may not be something you want.

During each lesson, you're able to view your speed, accuracy, and time.

Gradual Progress With Unique Settings: TypingAcademy

Useful settings you can customize.

Pauses automatically if you click away.

Only two lanuages to choose from.

Some lessons require a user account.

Lots of popups to test your typing speed.

TypingAcademy is a slick website that's useful for typing lessons because it can highlight the key you should focus on. There are several lessons: first-step lessons, warm-up lessons, and others in categories called Learn, Word, Finger, Hand, Practical, and Bonus.

We also like the keyboard settings you can edit, such as whether to use capital letters, how to handle mistakes, and toggles for animations, sound, live stats, and auto-pausing.

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  • Principles for Effective Learning
  • No mistakes. Always be sure and in control. Follow the principle of 100% correct practice: to make a mistake is to learn incorrect things, and to confuse that which you already know.
  • Slower is faster. Speed comes from certainty. The more you type things correctly, no matter how slow it has to be, the more certain you will be, and the faster you will become a proficient typist. Increase speed only when you feel sure enough to do so.
  • Don't look at the keyboard! If you don't know where a key is, look at the keyboard to find it, then look away and type the key. Do not guess; always be sure.
  • Type to a steady rhythm. Generally, the time between keystrokes should be the same, giving you a sense of flow and the ability to scan ahead at a constant speed.
  • Relax. No unnecessary or dysfunctional tension. Enjoy the rhythm of your own typing!
  • Hit the keys squarely in the center. If you find you aren't consistently doing so, SLOW DOWN!!! It should feel good to type!

Instructions for Use

  • Press the "Click here to start" button, then type what you see on the screen. If you type correctly, the letter will turn to grey. If you err, it won't, and you will hear an error sound.
  • To do the same again (which you should do if you make ANY mistakes), press the "Go again!" button that appears when you finish.
  • Remember, shoot for no errors!! That is the most important thing right now. Speed means nothing; certainty and correctness are what's important.
  • For practical purposes, you can consider yourself having mastered an exercise only if you are able to type three reloaded screens of exercises in a row in under 60 seconds each, with no errors, confidently.

Technical Help

If you are accessing this course on the desktop or a laptop, Google Chrome (currently the most popular browser in the world) is the recommended browser for this site, and switching to it will likely solve any issues you may be experiencing. It is a free download , easy to install, and available for all platforms.

Other major browsers, such as Apple Safari , Mozilla Firefox and Microsoft Internet Explorer should generally be ok, however please make sure you are using a current version. Older versions or other browsers may give inconsistent results.

Javascript is required for the typing functionality, so please ensure it is turned on in your browser preferences.

Some third-party extensions for web browsers, such as ad blockers, might interefere with the typing functionality. If you are using such an extension, turn it off temporarily and see if that is the cause. If so, it should be possible to whitelist this site so that the extension is turned off for this site only.

This course is not designed to be used with a soft keyboard on a tablet, although it has been successfully tested to work with iOS devices (iPad and iPhone). If you are on Android or a Windows Mobile device it is hit or miss, however it should work absolutely fine with an external keyboard. It is highly recommended to learn touch typing on a physical keyboard for the tactile feedback, and bluetooth keyboards can be obtained very inexpensively these days (i.e. as little as $10). This is a VERY worthwhile investment to learn touch typing, a skill which will last you a lifetime.

If you're still having problems, you can still access the old, Flash-based version of the course here .

Preliminaries

  • Introduction and Overview
  • Typing Ergonomics
  • Which Fingers Go Where

Typing Lessons

  • Home Row, Left Hand
  • Home Row, Right Hand
  • Home Row, Left + Right
  • Home Row, Extended Index Fingers
  • The Shift Keys
  • Quotes and Apostrophe
  • Home Row: The Whole Shebang
  • Top Row Left: QWERT
  • Top Row Right: YUIOP
  • It's Lonely at the Top: All Top Row Letters
  • Row by Row: Top & Home Rows Combined
  • Bottom Row Right: NM,./?
  • Bottom Row Left: ZXCVB
  • Putting It All Together: Bottom Row
  • Letters Consolidation
  • Take a Break!
  • The Brackets
  • Numbers Row Left: 12345
  • Numbers Row Right: 67890
  • Putting It All Together: Numbers
  • Numbers Row Left + Shift: !@#$%
  • Numbers Row Right + Shift: ^&*()
  • Math Keys: -=_+
  • Programming Keys: ~`|\
  • Putting It All Together: Special Characters
  • Numbers Row + Special Characters
  • The Last Connection
  • The Backspace/Delete Key
  • Where to Go From Here

Typing Exercises

  • The Finger Upper-Downer
  • The Up & Down Home Hopper
  • The Up & Down Homeless Hopper
  • The Forefinger Hand-Off
  • The Big Zig
  • Do You Have My Number?
  • Math Key Pinky Buster
  • Speed Typing: The Most Common Words
  • The Shift Key Shuffle
  • Make Your Own Exercise!

Typing Practice

  • Business Typing
  • Computer Programming Typing
  • English Typing
  • Fairy Tales Typing
  • Geography Typing
  • Legal Typing
  • Math Typing
  • Medical Typing
  • Sports Typing

Musical Typing

  • All Letters
  • Numbers Row
  • Special Characters

Speed Typing

Peter's online typing course.

Welcome to this new & improved, and still humble typing web course. Here you'll find an expanded set of free online typing lessons and typing exercises for beginning typists, and frustrated hunt-and-peckers who want to move from four-finger typing to full-blown touch typing.

I'm hoping the redesign of the site and added keyboarding lessons & exercises are much to your liking, but if for any reason you prefer things the way they were you can still access the previous site in its entirety here .

If you're new here, please begin with the Introduction and Overview .

If you are a returning user, you might just want to check out the new typing exercises , musical typing , speed typing and keyboarding practice areas!

© 2004-2024 Peter Hudson . All rights reserved.   This page last updated: 16 February 2024   |   Privacy Policy

  • Do not include content that contains any libelous or otherwise unlawful, abusive or obscene text.
  • Verify quotes added aren't duplicates of any already present
  • Please do not add extremely short quotes (less than 60 characters)
  • Submitting low quality quotes or misusing this form will cause you to lose access to this feature

https://github.com/

https://twitter.com/

monkey see monkeytype

distribution of time 60 leaderboard results (wpm)

Monkeytype is a minimalistic and customizable typing test. It features many test modes, an account system to save your typing speed history, and user-configurable features such as themes, sounds, a smooth caret, and more. Monkeytype attempts to emulate the experience of natural keyboard typing during a typing test, by unobtrusively presenting the text prompts and displaying typed characters in-place, providing straightforward, real-time feedback on typos, speed, and accuracy. Test yourself in various modes, track your progress and improve your speed.

By default, this website uses the most common 200 words in the English language to generate its tests. You can change to an expanded set (1000 most common words) in the options, or change the language entirely.

You can use tab and enter (or just tab if you have quick tab mode enabled) to restart the typing test. Open the command line by pressing ctrl/cmd + shift + p or esc - there you can access all the functionality you need without touching your mouse

wpm - total number of characters in the correctly typed words (including spaces), divided by 5 and normalised to 60 seconds.

raw wpm - calculated just like wpm, but also includes incorrect words.

acc - percentage of correctly pressed keys.

char - correct characters / incorrect characters. Calculated after the test has ended.

consistency - based on the variance of your raw wpm. Closer to 100% is better. Calculated using the coefficient of variation of raw wpm and mapped onto a scale from 0 to 100.

After completing a test you will be able to see your wpm, raw wpm, accuracy, character stats, test length, leaderboards info and test info. (you can hover over some values to get floating point numbers). You can also see a graph of your wpm and raw over the duration of the test. Remember that the wpm line is a global average, while the raw wpm line is a local, momentary value. (meaning if you stop, the value is 0)

If you encounter a bug, or have a feature request - join the Discord server, send me an email, a direct message on Twitter or create an issue on GitHub.

Thanks to everyone who has supported this project. It would not be possible without you and your continued support.

If you encounter a bug, have a feature request or just want to say hi - here are the different ways you can contact me directly.

Montydrei  for the name suggestion

Everyone  who provided valuable feedback on the original reddit post for the prototype of this website

Supporters who helped financially by donating, enabling optional ads or buying merch

Contributors  on GitHub that have helped with implementing various features, adding themes and more

How To Type

Free typing lessons, typing practice and typing tests..

Octopus

Typing Practice

Practice typing great quotes from great books and stimulate your mind while exercising your fingers! Learn to type faster as you apply the technique taught in our free touch typing lessons .

An excerpt from

Preview the Kindle Edition

Typing Practice Tips

Make the most of your typing practice! The fastest typists recommend these tips to improve your typing speed and accuracy:

1. Learn to touch type.

Touch typing is a typing technique in which you always use the same finger to type each key, without looking at the keyboard. It takes some practice to learn, but training these consistent finger motions will enable you to type much faster than you could otherwise. The How-to-Type.com typing lessons will teach you to touch type using the standard QWERTY typing technique. The lessons consist of basic typing and finger training exercises to guide you through the skills for typing each key.

Once you have learned the technique you can practice your typing here on this page to boost your speed and accuracy. Your fingers will learn to strike the correct keys automatically and you won’t need to stop to find them on the keyboard. Your mind will be free to think about what you are typing instead of where the keys are. With routine typing practice, you will thoroughly master the skill and become more productive at everything you do at the keyboard!

2. Minimize your hand movements and physical effort.

Practice keeping your fingers positioned on the home row, curved slightly down so that you can easily extend them to type the keys on the rows above and below with minimal movement. Let the palms of your hands float just above the keyboard and rest your thumbs on the space bar. Strike the keys with a quick and light touch.

It is also a good practice to maintain a relaxed and comfortable posture to minimize muscle strain and fatigue. Raise the height of your seat, or stand if necessary so that your arms and hands are resting comfortably down at the keyboard and your eyes are glancing down at your screen. Adjust your screen so that you can clearly see what you are typing without straining your eyes and neck. As you practice typing, remember that you will carry the habits you develop now with you into the future, whenever you type on a keyboard.

3. Practice typing for accuracy, not speed.

If you are making mistakes, slow down. You will not get faster by making lots of typos because it will take more time to go back and fix them all. Furthermore, practicing poor technique will impede your progress by reinforcing your mistakes and bad habits. Typing practice is an exercise, not a race. Type precisely at a rate that you are comfortable with. Your speed will naturally increase as your typing skills

4. Visualize as you type.

You will find this tip most useful once you have confidently learned the positions of all the keys and are practicing to increase your typing speed. Think about the words just ahead of where you are typing and imagine your fingers moving across the keyboard to type them. Your typing will really begin to flow when you can achieve this.

If you are just learning the keys and not quite ready for this, you can employ the power of visualization in your practice by imagining each letter on the keyboard and your finger moving to it before you type it.

5. Maintain your focus on typing.

Don’t practice in a noisy environment. Eliminate distractions. You are more likely to make mistakes if you are distracted, and you do not want to practice making mistakes that would be counterproductive to your goals. If you find your concentration drifting, try to regain focus or consider taking a break and coming back to your typing practice at a better time.

Privacy Policy

Copyright © 2024 Blue Sheep Software LLC . All rights reserved.

Delete your Typing Data

Are you sure you want to delete all of your typing records? Your typing logs and records will all be deleted permanently. This cannot be undone.

Your data has been deleted.

Imagination Soup

10 Best Programs: Typing Lessons for Kids

W hat typing programs and typing lesson websites are recommended by librarians, teachers, parents, and students? Discover the best typing (keyboarding) lessons with step-by-step instruction, repetition, and fun!

Why do kids need typing lessons?

Why do kids need to learn typing? It’s not just about typing skills or typing speed, but it’s about growing this necessary skill to use the keyboard for academic and future work success/

The benefits for kids include getting thoughts down on paper faster, building efficacy that they can accomplish challenging goals, building speed of processing, gaining the ability to edit quickly, developing less aversion to writing , spending less time on school work, improving fine motor skills, and improving spelling.

Touch typing (keyboarding) is a BIG improvement over hunt and peck methods kids develop.  According to this article , touch typing is an example of cognitive automaticity which means we don’t have to think about what we’re doing.  This frees up our working memory to use our brains for higher-level thinking.

Honestly, I think typing instruction should be a required class for kids! In my experience, my high school touch typing class was THE BEST and MOST USEFUL class I took in high school. (Also, Home Ec– remember those days? I learned how to boil an egg!)

That’s why I signed my kids up for an in-person touch-typing class one summer of middle school. And the class paid off big time because almost everything they do in high school and in university requires a keyboard. Being able to type means they can get their thoughts down on paper faster and finish sooner.

Consider these keyboarding benefits:

  • typing well lets you get your thoughts on paper faster
  • typing helps you finish your assignments faster

I’ve learned that around 8 or 9 years old is a good age to start typing lessons. For one, kids’ hands are big enough to reach the keys on the keyboard. This is also a good age because a child’s hand-eye coordination will improve quicker than at younger ages.

And even though their hands are small, according to my daughters’ typing teachers, we type from our shoulders, not our hands. This makes it possible to learn typing in early elementary grades.

What is Touch Typing?

With touch typing, keyboarding becomes a fluid movement where you don’t need to look where your hands are.

Teach beginners the home row keys and use a keyboard that has bumps on the f and j keys OR add your own bumps with small triangle stickers. My children’s typing teachers told the kids to make their hands into tiger claws with “thumbs kissing.”

So kids don’t look at their hands, cover the keyboard with the lid of a cardboard box. This will help your kids look at the screen as they slowly learn the entire keyboard and increase in difficulty levels.

My kids progress through the keyboard’s lines (middle, bottom, top) and the individual keys.

Don’t let your kids advance on new keys until they’ve shown mastery of the first keys taught.

Learning Disabilities & Advocacy

We need to help kids with output — to know what to do with the input they are reading or hearing.

This skill is essential for all learners but especially children with learning differences .

If you have a child whose handwriting means they turn in incomplete work, or it limits what they produce in school, consider typing lessons and allowing them to use a keyboard for school. (Either a laptop or a Bluetooth-enabled keyboard with a tablet.)

But . . . what if your child’s teachers disagree about allowing a keyboard?

Advocate with information.

Track how long your child takes for homework with a keyboard and without a keyboard. (Information is power!)

Get a writing sample written by hand and another typed on a keyboard. Often because of output possibilities with the keyboard, the difference is so notable that it will make your point. (One sentence by hand versus a paragraph with keyboarding?)

Typing Programs & Typing Lessons for Kids

Many of these free typing programs also offer a paid version — or a reduced subscription rate for educators.

Typing.com 

VISIT WEBSITE

Typing.com is one of the most popular typing program choices for teachers and librarians to teach kids keyboarding skills.  The benefits of this program are that it tracks student progress and is compatible with Google classroom. Teachers and librarians surveyed preferred this site most of all. Because there are ads, they can make the program crash, according to one teacher.

Popular with many classrooms, you can use the free version or paid version. The program has young children begin learning where the letters are located and mouse skills. Use the free for these younger kids. For more advanced options, then try the paid subscription. It will give you more practice options and practice games, and you can track student progress.

Typing Club

Typing Club is one of the most popular typing programs for kids that many librarians use. You can get it for free with ads or pay $4 a student and use it without ads. This program can track student progress which librarians and teachers prefer. You’ll be able to view which typing lessons each child has mastered.

Dance Mat Typing

Fun and popular, this is a fabulous typing game choice with amazing graphics from the BBC with skill-level games kids will enjoy.

This is FUN, and elementary students love it. It’s a typing game that provides kids with practice typing. It’s not as instructive as the other programs, so use it with other typing programs that are more instructional. Typing.com includes the racing game NitroType — which kids love.

Keyboarding without Tears

Not many educators use this website, but it was mentioned by one librarian I spoke with. Do you use it?

More Keyboarding Websites

Typing Games from Slime Kids (free typing games online)

ABCya Typing Game (free typing game online)

Type Kids (paid typing website for kids to learn typing)

Which typing programs do you use?

When did you start typing lessons with your kids or students?

KEEP READING

Writing Prompts for Kids

Coding for Kids

Women’s History Month Biographies

Graphic Novels for Kids

Books About Characters with Learning Disabilities

The post 10 Best Programs: Typing Lessons for Kids appeared first on Imagination Soup .

What typing programs and typing lesson websites are recommended by librarians, teachers, parents, and students? Discover the best typing (keyboarding) lessons with step-by-step instruction, repetition, and fun!

Typing Training - Practice Free Typing Lessons with Online Tutor

The free typing lessons supply the complete "How to type" package. Animated keyboard layout and the typing tutor graphic hands are used to correct mis-typing by showing the right way to type for your learning and practice experience. Lessons' difficulty gradually raises as it starts from only 2 characters and ends with the entire keyboard. When the lesson ends, you can learn a lot from the practice trends: WPM, accuracy and errors distribution.

Tips for success:

  • When you practice typing - don't look at the keyboard - not even a quick peek! Look only at the screen.
  • The basic position can be easily found without looking at the keyboard - feel the bumps on 'F' and 'J'.
  • At first typing tutorials , practiced letters won't spell out words. As you get to know the keys, "real" words and sentences will be used. That is the only way to learn typing correctly.
  • Remember to type test your speed periodically. With our typing test you can check for both speed and accuracy progress. The number of words per minute indicates your typing level. If you are still unsatisfied with the results - go back to the typing tutors and keep practicing!

typing lessons keyboard

Magic Keyboard for iPad Pro 11-inch (4th generation) and iPad Air (5th generation) - US English - Black

Magic Keyboard for iPad Pro 11-inch (3rd generation) and iPad Air (5th generation) in Black, attached to iPad.

Product Information

The Magic Keyboard is an amazing companion for iPad Pro 11-inch and iPad Air. It features an incredible typing experience, a trackpad that opens up new ways to work with iPadOS, a USB‑C port for pass-through charging, and front and back protection. The Magic Keyboard has a floating cantilever design, allowing you to attach iPad Pro and iPad Air magnetically and to smoothly adjust it to the perfect viewing angle for you.

Comfortable backlit keys and a scissor mechanism with 1 mm travel for quiet, responsive typing.

Designed for Multi‑Touch gestures and the cursor in iPadOS.

Smooth angle adjustability delivers the perfect viewing angle.

USB-C port for charging iPad Pro and iPad Air, freeing up the port on the iPad for other accessories.

Folds into a case to provide front and back protection for traveling with iPad Pro and iPad Air.

System Requirements

iPadPro 11-inch (1st, 2nd, 3rd, or 4th generation) or iPad Air (4th or 5th generation) running iPadOS 14.5 or later.

Compatibility

Ipad models.

  • iPad Pro 11-inch (4th generation)
  • iPad Pro 11-inch (3rd generation)
  • iPad Pro 11-inch (2nd generation)
  • iPad Pro 11-inch (1st generation)
  • iPad Air (5th generation)
  • iPad Air (4th generation)

* Monthly pricing is available when you select Apple Card Monthly Installments (ACMI) as payment type at checkout at Apple, and is subject to credit approval and credit limit. Financing terms vary by product. Taxes and shipping are not included in ACMI and are subject to your card’s variable APR. See the Apple Card Customer Agreement (Opens in a new window) for more information. ACMI is not available for purchases made online at special storefronts. The last month’s payment for each product will be the product’s purchase price, less all other payments at the monthly payment amount. ACMI financing is subject to change at any time for any reason, including but not limited to, installment term lengths and eligible products. See support.apple.com/kb/HT211204 (Opens in a new window) for information about upcoming changes to ACMI financing.

To access and use all Apple Card features and products available only to Apple Card users, you must add Apple Card to Wallet on an iPhone or iPad that supports and has the latest version of iOS or iPadOS. Apple Card is subject to credit approval, available only for qualifying applicants in the United States, and issued by Goldman Sachs Bank USA, Salt Lake City Branch.

If you reside in the U.S. territories, please call Goldman Sachs at 877-255-5923 with questions about Apple Card.

1. Magic Keyboard subject to availability. 2. Magic Keyboard is sold separately. Compatible with iPad Pro 11-inch (1st generation or later), iPad Pro 12.9-inch (3rd generation or later), and iPad Air (4th generation or later).

  • Mental Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Cognitive Science
  • Psychopharmacology

Writing by hand may increase brain connectivity more than typing on a keyboard

In an ever more digital world, pen and paper are increasingly getting replaced with screens and keyboards in classrooms. Now, a new study has investigated neural networks in the brain during hand- and typewriting. The researchers showed that connectivity between different brain regions is more elaborate when letters are formed by hand. This improved brain connectivity, which is crucial to memory building and information encoding, may indicate that writing by hand supports learning.

As digital devices progressively replace pen and paper, taking notes by hand is becoming increasingly uncommon in schools and universities. Using a keyboard is recommended because it’s often faster than writing by hand. However, the latter has been found to improve spelling accuracy and  memory recall .

To find out if the process of forming letters by hand resulted in greater brain connectivity, researchers in Norway now investigated the underlying neural networks involved in both modes of writing.

“We show that when writing by hand, brain connectivity patterns are far more elaborate than when typewriting on a keyboard,” said Prof Audrey van der Meer, a brain researcher at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and co-author of the study published in  Frontiers in Psychology . “Such widespread brain connectivity is known to be crucial for memory formation and for encoding new information and, therefore, is beneficial for learning.”

The pen is mightier than the (key)board

The researchers collected EEG data from 36 university students who were repeatedly prompted to either write or type a word that appeared on a screen. When writing, they used a digital pen to write in cursive directly on a  touchscreen . When typing they used a single finger to press keys on a keyboard. High-density EEGs, which measure electrical activity in the brain using 256 small sensors sewn in a net and placed over the head, were recorded for five seconds for every prompt.

Connectivity of different brain regions increased when participants wrote by hand, but not when they typed. “Our findings suggest that visual and movement information obtained through precisely controlled  hand movements  when using a pen contribute extensively to the brain’s connectivity patterns that promote learning,” van der Meer said.

Read original article

Download original article (pdf)

Movement for memory

Although the participants used digital pens for  handwriting , the researchers said that the results are expected to be the same when using a real pen on paper. “We have shown that the differences in brain activity are related to the careful forming of the letters when writing by hand while making more use of the senses,” van der Meer explained. Since it is the movement of the fingers carried out when forming letters that promotes brain connectivity, writing in print is also expected to have similar benefits for learning as cursive writing.

On the contrary, the simple movement of hitting a key with the same finger repeatedly is less stimulating for the brain. “This also explains why children who have learned to write and read on a tablet, can have difficulty differentiating between letters that are mirror images of each other, such as ‘b’ and ‘d’. They literally haven’t felt with their bodies what it feels like to produce those letters,” van der Meer said.

A balancing act

Their findings demonstrate the need to give students the opportunity to use pens, rather than having them type during class, the researchers said. Guidelines to ensure that students receive at least a minimum of handwriting instruction could be an adequate step. For example, cursive writing training has been re-implemented in many US states at the beginning of the year.

At the same time, it is also important to keep up with continuously developing technological advances, they cautioned. This includes awareness of what way of writing offers more advantages under which circumstances. “There is some evidence that students learn more and remember better when taking handwritten lecture notes, while using a computer with a keyboard may be more practical when writing a long text or essay,” van der Meer concluded.

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How-To Geek

Buying a new keyboard get a hot-swappable model.

Of all the features you could want in a mechanical keyboard, make sure this is one of them.

Key Takeaways

  • Hot-swappable keyboards allow you to experiment with different switches.
  • They're also much easier and cheaper to fix compared to keyboards with soldered switches.
  • Even if the PCB breaks, you can still keep the keycaps and switches; you only need to replace the housing and PCB.

Hot-swappable mechanical keyboards that let you change out the switches without soldering are not just for keyboard enthusiasts. They have some notable benefits, to the point that I wouldn't buy a new keyboard that isn't hot-swappable. Here are just a few of the benefits.

Hot-Swappable Keyboards Are Fun and Let You Experiment

Choosing a mechanical keyboard switch is already hard enough on its own, but the fact that you have to shell out somewhere around $60 to $200 makes it an even more daunting task. If you buy a keyboard with switches that don't feel right to you, you're pretty much stuck with it or have to sell it at a discount. With a hot-swappable keyboard, you can replace the switches as often as you like without changing your keycaps, PCB, housing, and accessories.

If your keyboard comes with red switches, but you find that they're too easy to double-tap by accident, you can effortlessly replace them with black switches. Sure, you'll have to pay for the switches just like you'd pay for a keyboard, but they tend to be cheaper, and you can always resell the old set at a small loss.

My favorite thing about hot-swappable switches is that they let you swap out individual keys. If you play 'League of Legends,' you can use red switches for your primary spells and the harder-to-press black switches for spells with a long cooldown. FPS gamers can use lighter switches for movement and heavier ones for equipment. Typists can use clicky switches for letters and tactile switches for various function keys. The possibilities go as far as your creativity does.

After buying a hot-swappable keyboard, you might even turn into a full-on keyboard enthusiast and want to do advanced modifications. For instance, lubing the switches makes them feel much smoother and gives you a deep, satisfying "thock" sound. Since lubing takes a lot of time, switch manufacturers sell pre-lubed switches, too, so you can easily buy a set and see if you like it. If you prefer less noise instead, you can add O-rings and a thick foam pad underneath the PCB.

If you get bored with the same style quickly, interchangeable keycaps are a life-saver. While keycaps are mostly interchangeable on mechanical keyboards across the board, you might have trouble sourcing the exact keycaps you want with certain keyboard models and brands. They sometimes have odd keycap sizes and angles; the Alt, Ctrl, and Space buttons might be wider or shorter on some keyboards from Razer, Corsair, and Logitech. This limits your keycap choice significantly, as you'll have to look for a compatible set. I have "pudding" keycaps on my Corsair K70, and they were tough to find.

A Corsair K70 keyboard in the dark with pudding keycaps and RGB lights.

In contrast, hot-swappable keyboards are inclined to stick to the "standard" keyboard layout and keycap sizes. The manufacturers know that people who buy these types of keyboards like to experiment, and it's mutually beneficial to stick to standard layouts. After all, if you spent $100 on a fancy set of keycaps, you would want to use them on all of your keyboards, and not just the one it was designed for.

They're Much Easier to Fix

Traditional mechanical keyboards have soldered switches. If you want to remove a single switch, you have to open up the whole keyboard and use a soldering iron to desolder the switch. When you want to install a new one, you put it in where the old one was and solder it on. I've done this a few times on my Corsair K70 , and it was quite cumbersome. Not to mention that I permanently damaged my PCB while desoldering and had to repair the traces.

Now, compare that to yanking out a switch and pushing in the new one on hot-swappable keyboards. It takes seconds, costs next to nothing, and is relatively safe to do. You can still damage the PCB while doing this, but you can minimize the risk with a high-quality switch puller . So, when a key starts double typing and rubbing alcohol doesn't help, you won't have to go through a laborious process to replace a $1 switch.

Closeup of Gateron Blue switch on NZXT Function keyboard

Even if the PCB Breaks, You Get to Keep the Rest

If a hot-swappable keyboard's PCB gets irreparably broken, or you just don't have the technical know-how required to fix traces on a PCB, just throw it out and buy a new one. They typically cost $30 to $80 to replace, much less than a high-end mechanical keyboard.

You could even use the opportunity to change the entire keyboard model. You get to keep the keycaps and switches, which make up a significant portion of the keyboard's price. You'd only need a new barebones kit that contains the housing and PCB. It's an excellent opportunity to try a different keyboard brand and software without breaking the bank, and you get to keep your fancy switches and keycaps.

Are There Any Advantages to Soldered Switches?

The one key benefit of keyboards with soldered switches is that they're more reliable. Soldered switches are very stable, and the pins on the bottom won't lose contact with the PCB, which means you won't face unregistered key taps. Granted, modern hot-swappable keyboards are fairly reliable, even if we include budget models. Also, if there's a metal plate between the switch and the PCB, like on my Corsair K70, the keyboard will feel more stable.

A myth you might've heard is that soldered keyboards have reduced latency, but that's totally false. When you press a key, it either registers or it doesn't, and the type of electric contact doesn't play any role.

There's nothing wrong with traditional mechanical keyboards. But if you favor easy repairability, you should get a hot-swappable keyboard. Thanks to their flexibility, you can stay on the bleeding edge of keyboard technology and try out different switches as they come out.

IMAGES

  1. Typing Lesson 1.1

    typing lessons keyboard

  2. Learn the basics of touch typing with KeyBlaze

    typing lessons keyboard

  3. Lesson 1: How to place the fingers on the keyboard. Typing Course

    typing lessons keyboard

  4. Learn English Typing in 10 Days

    typing lessons keyboard

  5. How To Become Keyboard Typing Master

    typing lessons keyboard

  6. Best Typing Tutorial For Beginners

    typing lessons keyboard

VIDEO

  1. Keyboard Typing Practice Day 1 TIMELAPSE

  2. Dive into the World of Typing: Mastering the Computer Keyboard

  3. How to learn typing fast on keyboard for beginners (Part 1)

  4. How to learning typing keyboard

  5. Beginner Typing Lessons Intro Home Keys & Correct Finger Position Instructions #typistmanu #shorts

  6. Keyboard typing

COMMENTS

  1. Typing Lessons

    Learn to touch type and improve your typing speed with free interactive typing lessons for all ages. Start your typing practice now!

  2. Learn Touch Typing Free

    Learn touch typing online using TypingClub's free typing courses. It includes 650 typing games, typing tests and videos. Toggle navigation ... Typing lesson plan for a standard Dvorak keyboard from beginner to advanced. Includes games, videos and other interactive lessons. Learn more.

  3. Learn to Type

    a s i e r f o r F r e e Aligned to Federal and State Standards Prepares Students for Standardized Testing Powerful District and Classroom Management Learn to Type for Free Join millions of Typing.com users and learn to type at your own pace with gamified lessons and student-led progression. Start Typing Today »

  4. Typing practice

    Typing Practice Metrics: Speed: 0.0wpm 0.0wpm 0 All keys: E N T I R A L S O U D Y C H G M P K B W Current key: E Not calibrated, need more samples. Daily goal: 0%/30 minutes tear⸱nine⸱ten⸱are⸱tree⸱nine⸱tear⸱near⸱enter⸱near⸱are⸱nearer⸱ ate⸱ear⸱eat⸱ear⸱enter⸱near⸱intent⸱treat⸱tent⸱are⸱entertain⸱ near

  5. Typing lessons

    First steps lessons ? First and very easy typing lessons for learning all key positions. Suitable for beginners. Base position dynamic generic 7 signs Home row dynamic generic 9 signs Home row and top row dynamic generic 19 signs Home row and bottom row dynamic generic 16 signs All letters dynamic generic 26 signs All rows dynamic generic 36 signs

  6. Free Online Typing Tutor

    How to Learn to Type: No looking at your Keyboard! This is important - don't do it! Touch typing is a skill that uses muscle memory to know where the keys are without the sense of sight. You can't learn to swim without getting wet; likewise, you can't learn to touch type by looking down at the keyboard.

  7. TypingAcademy: Learn touch typing with our free typing practice

    Practice Choose from a variety of free typing lessons and practice your typing skills gradually. Statistics Follow your progress by keeping an eye on your latest results and your long-term improvements. Type faster with ease There are many typing tutors out there. Why should I choose TypeLift? Accessibility

  8. How To Type

    Learn how to type with how-to-type.com! Typing Lessons Learn to Type Graduate from hunt-and-peck to touch typing mastery with our complete course of free touch typing lessons. Typing Practice Practice Typing Practice is the key to developing excellent typing skills. Make it fun by typing great quotes from great books! Typing Tests

  9. Learn how to type faster. Touch typing tips

    Keep your elbows bent at the right angle. Face the screen with your head slightly tilted forward. Keep at least 45 - 70 cm of distance between your eyes and the screen. Еxpose the shoulder, arm, and wrist muscles to the least possible strain. The wrists can touch the tabletop in front of the keyboard. Never shift your body weight to the wrists ...

  10. Ratatype

    Take typing lessons on touch typing tutor Ratatype 💻, practice your keyboarding skills online, take a typing speed test and get typing speed certificate for free. ... Speed up your learning progress with Ratatype typing tutor and develop valuable keyboarding skills! View tips. Find your course. English, Spanish, French, Polish, and even ...

  11. 13 Best Free Typing Lessons for Kids and Adults

    The top free keyboarding lessons online By Stacy Fisher Updated on October 20, 2023 Reviewed by Christine Baker These free typing lessons will teach you how to type and improve your speed and accuracy. They're geared toward every age group and situation, and all have different features that make them great and unique.

  12. Learn Typing

    Learn Typing is an online free typing tutor. Our typing lessons, games, speed tests and videos make it easy for everyone to learn typing.

  13. Typing Training

    Lesson 14 Lesson 15 Lesson 16 My Text The free typing lessons supply the complete "How to type" package. Animated keyboard layout and the typing tutor graphic hands are used to correct mis-typing by showing the right way to type for your learning and practice experience.

  14. Peter's Online Typing Course

    Turn yourself into a typing hero! Welcome to this new & improved, and still humble typing web course. Here you'll find an expanded set of free online typing lessons and typing exercises for beginning typists, and frustrated hunt-and-peckers who want to move from four-finger typing to full-blown touch typing. I'm hoping the redesign of the site ...

  15. Beginner Typing Lesson 1a

    Quickly learn how to type the Home Row Keys: A, S, D, F, J, K, L and ; with the correct finger position. Work through the beginner typing lessons for about 30 minutes each day, five days a week to become a fast, accurate and confident touch typist.

  16. Monkeytype

    It features many test modes, an account system to save your typing speed history, and user-configurable features such as themes, sounds, a smooth caret, and more. Monkeytype attempts to emulate the experience of natural keyboard typing during a typing test, by unobtrusively presenting the text prompts and displaying typed characters in-place ...

  17. Typing Practice

    Typing Practice. Practice typing great quotes from great books and stimulate your mind while exercising your fingers! Learn to type faster as you apply the technique taught in our free touch typing lessons. Practice a New Quote. Difficulty: 0.2 Lower case only Exercise info. One repays a teacher badly if one always remains nothing but a pupil.

  18. 10 Best Programs: Typing Lessons for Kids

    What typing programs and typing lesson websites are recommended by librarians, teachers, parents, and students? Discover the best typing (keyboarding) lessons with step-by-step instruction ...

  19. www.sense-lang.org

    Moved Permanently. The document has moved here.

  20. Magic Keyboard for iPad Pro 11-inch (4th generation) and iPad ...

    It features an incredible typing experience, a trackpad that opens up new ways to work with iPadOS, a USB‑C port for pass-through charging, and front and back protection. The Magic Keyboard has a floating cantilever design, allowing you to attach iPad Pro and iPad Air magnetically and to smoothly adjust it to the perfect viewing angle for you.

  21. Writing by hand may increase brain connectivity more than typing on a

    This includes awareness of what way of writing offers more advantages under which circumstances. "There is some evidence that students learn more and remember better when taking handwritten lecture notes, while using a computer with a keyboard may be more practical when writing a long text or essay," van der Meer concluded.

  22. The 4 Piano Chords That Unlock Hundreds of Songs

    Main Chords: C, Am, F, G (optional: Dm7, Bb) Chord Variations: C/E, Fmaj7, F6, F/A. Ultimate Guitar Chord Chart. Tutorial. "Let It Be" is one of those songs nearly everyone knows, and it makes for a perfect spur-of-the-moment sing-along. While "Let It Be" only has four core chords, they undergo several variations.

  23. Buying a New Keyboard? Get a Hot-Swappable Model

    If a hot-swappable keyboard's PCB gets irreparably broken, or you just don't have the technical know-how required to fix traces on a PCB, just throw it out and buy a new one. They typically cost $30 to $80 to replace, much less than a high-end mechanical keyboard. You could even use the opportunity to change the entire keyboard model.

  24. Moscow Music Academy

    Moscow Music Academy offering fun professional music lessons online for piano, guitar, voice, singing, drums, violin, ukulele, recorder as well as various music programs so you can learn to play your favorite songs! Call Today! 208-882-6733 207 S Washington, Moscow Idaho 83843

  25. Yulia Monastyrenko

    The name of my musical composition "140 Piano", like the eponymous name of my concert program, carries a little intrigue. Surely, when you listen to it, the ...